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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Postherpetic Neuralgia Treatment - Práva úcastníka studie

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Postherpetic Neuralgia Treatment to Práva úcastníka studie. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Postherpetic Neuralgia Treatment
    Postherpetic neuralgia treatment can involve medications, lifestyle changes, and other options. The eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the treatment options available to patients with postherpetic neuralgia.
  • Postpartum Bleeding
    Some postpartum bleeding is normal, and most of it occurs right after birth. This eMedTV resource talks about normal bleeding and postpartum hemorrhage (which can occur when the uterus fails to contract during and after delivery of the placenta).
  • Postpartum BTL
    This video clip describes how a BTL is performed postpartum, or after giving birth.
  • Postpartum BTL - Presentation Summary
    This video explains what is involved in a postpartum tubal ligation.
  • Postpartum Deppression
    As this eMedTV page explains, if depression symptoms last longer than two weeks after giving birth, it may indicate postpartum depression. This page also lists possible symptoms. Postpartum deppression is a common misspelling of postpartum depression.
  • Postpartum Depression
    Many women will experience what is known as the "baby blues," but some will develop postpartum depression. This eMedTV segment deals with this more serious condition, including information on symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Postpartum Depression
    This video summarizes common symptoms of postpartum depression.
  • Postpartum Depression After C-Section
    Postpartum depression occurs in 10 to 15 out of every 100 women who have a cesarean delivery. This eMedTV resource discusses the symptoms of postpartum depression after c-section and why these symptoms can occur.
  • Postpartum Depression Causes
    As this eMedTV page explains, hormonal changes or lack of help after the baby is born are possible causes of postpartum depression. Women who have experienced this condition before (or have certain risk factors) are at risk for developing it again.
  • Postpartum Depression Symptoms
    As this eMedTV page explains, postpartum depression symptoms are more than just the "baby blues." Common signs and symptoms of postpartum depression include lack of interest in the baby, anxiety attacks, and thoughts of harming oneself or the baby.
  • Postpartum Depression Treatment
    As this eMedTV page explains, a plan to treat postpartum depression often uses medication and psychotherapy to help women overcome this condition. This page explains why women should continue with treatment for a time, even after they feel better.
  • Postpartum Depression vs. the Baby Blues
    It can sometimes be hard to tell the difference between postpartum depression and the "baby blues," so this eMedTV article talks about how they compare. In this segment, we give some common new-parent scenarios and explore what your reactions might mean.
  • Postpartum Preeclampsia Review
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site lists symptoms of postpartum preeclampsia and discusses treatment options. Symptoms may appear up to six weeks after the delivery of the baby and include high blood pressure and vision problems.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation
    Postpartum tubal ligation is a surgical procedure used to prevent pregnancy. As this eMedTV page explains, it is performed shortly after a woman gives birth. This page covers postpartum tubal ligation, including its risks, benefits, and alternatives.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation -- Minor Complications
    This interactive video discusses possible minor complications associated with this procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Alternatives
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are several postpartum tubal ligation alternatives, such as periodic abstinence, condoms, diaphragms, and other methods. However, these alternatives are not as effective as tubal ligation.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation and the Operating Room
    This eMedTV article explains that you may see anesthesia equipment, sterile instruments, and unfamiliar items in the operating room when having your postpartum tubal ligation. This page discusses postpartum tubal ligation and the operating room.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Anesthesia Options
    This video clip discusses the type of anesthesia you may be given and risks to consider.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Results
    In over 99 percent of cases, having a postpartum tubal ligation results in complete sterilization. This eMedTV selection explores the possible outcomes of the surgery, including an increased risk of ectopic pregnancy.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Abnormal Scar Formation
    This video explains why you may have abnormal scar formation after this procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Allergic Reaction To Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Bleeding and Blood Vessel Damage
    This video explains what may happen if you have major bleeding and blood vessel damage with this procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Blood Clots
    This video clip gives an overview of blood clots, including how they are treated.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Delayed Bowel Function, or Ileus
    This video file explains how, why, and when an ileus (delayed bowel function) may occur.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Infection
    This interactive video discusses possible infections that may occur due to this procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Intestine or Bowel Damage
    This interactive video describes possible bowel damage that may occur with this procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Need for Major Abdominal Surgery
    This video discusses the possibility that major abdominal surgery may need to be considered.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Nerve Damage
    This video explains how nerve damage can occur during your procedure.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Organ Damage
    This video explains possible organ damage that can occur during any abdominal surgery.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Risks -- Risks As a Diabetic
    This video clip explains that your risk of complications is higher if you are a diabetic.
  • Postpartum Tubal Ligation Surgery
    As this eMedTV page explains, a postpartum tubal ligation lasts between 15 and 45 minutes and results in the blocking of the fallopian tubes, thus preventing pregnancy. This page tells you what to expect during your postpartum tubal ligation surgery.
  • Posttherpetic Neuralgia
    This eMedTV article describes postherpetic neuralgia, a shingles complication marked by pain that persists after the shingles rash has healed. Posttherpetic neuralgia is a common misspelling of postherpetic neuralgia.
  • Poszczególne fazy badan klinicznych
    Badania kliniczne s? zwykle podzielone na kilka faz.
  • Potassium and Digoxin
    If you have high or low blood potassium and are taking digoxin, potentially serious problems may occur. This eMedTV Web selection explains how an electrolyte imbalance may increase your risk for digoxin toxicity or make digoxin ineffective.
  • Potassium and High Blood Pressure
    Doctors studying the effect of potassium on high blood pressure have proven the supplement to be of benefit. This eMedTV page explains the results of research studies, provides examples of foods high in this mineral, and offers intake recommendations.
  • Potassium Iodide for Radiation Emergencies
    In a radiation emergency, who should take potassium iodide, and how much should be taken? This eMedTV article explains how to reduce your risk of thyroid problems, with details on how this form of iodine works. This page also describes what it cannot do.
  • Potential Benefits and Risks to the LIver Donor Recipient
    This video discusses the potential benefits and risks to the liver recipient.
  • Potential Causes of Stress (Following Liver Donation)
    Many things can cause stress to you, your family, and friends both before and after this surgery. This multimedia clip talks about liver donation and stress.
  • Potential Causes of Stress Following Liver Donation Surgery
    Any surgery involves risks, and you may experience stress as a result. This eMedTV resource discusses potential causes of stress following liver donation surgery, such as financial difficulties, and offers suggestions for relieving it.
  • Potiga
    Potiga is a drug licensed to treat partial-onset seizures in adults. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at this prescription medicine, with detailed information on dosing, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Potiga and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, the manufacturer of Potiga (ezogabine) recommends that women not use this drug while nursing. This resource talks about breastfeeding and Potiga, including the results of animal studies done on this topic.
  • Potiga and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Potiga (ezogabine) was shown to cause problems when given to pregnant animals. This article offers important information for women who are considering taking Potiga during pregnancy, including problems that might occur.
  • Potiga Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, Potiga comes in the form of a tablet that is taken three times daily. This resource outlines specific dosing guidelines for Potiga and lists helpful tips on how to take it.
  • Potiga Drug Interactions
    Taking Potiga with phenytoin, alcohol, or other medicines may cause negative reactions. This eMedTV segment outlines other products that may cause problems with Potiga, and describes the complications that these drug interactions may cause.
  • Potiga Medication Information
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Potiga to help control partial-onset seizures in adults. This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on Potiga, including how this medication is thought to work, dosing guidelines, and safety precautions.
  • Potiga Overdose
    The specific effects of a Potiga (ezogabine) overdose depend on how much was taken and other factors. This eMedTV Web page describes some of the possible symptoms that may occur when too much of this drug is taken and covers possible treatment options.
  • Potiga Side Effects
    Confusion and bladder problems are common -- and potentially serious -- side effects of Potiga. This eMedTV segment lists other problems this drug may cause, and explains which reactions are potentially dangerous and require medical care.
  • Potiga Uses
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Potiga is used for the treatment of partial-onset seizures in adults. This page explains how this prescription drug works to prevent abnormal electrical brain activity from spreading and describes possible unapproved uses.
  • Potiga Warnings and Precautions
    Potiga may increase your risk for developing certain problems, such as delusions or thoughts of suicide. This eMedTV Web page offers more precautions and warnings for Potiga, including details on why this drug may not be safe for some people.
  • Pour, Don't Spread
    When cooking (or even when baking, in some situations), choose oils that are liquids at room temperature instead of solid alternatives (lard, shortening, or butter). Olive oil is an excellent choice (although it burns more easily than most other oils), but even inexpensive vegetable oils will provide some benefit.
  • Power Lines and Leukemia
    Recent studies show that there is little evidence suggesting a link between power lines and leukemia. This eMedTV Web page discusses power lines and leukemia, and offers a link to additional information.
  • Practice Gratefulness
    It's easy to start feeling sorry for yourself after getting a stent. You imagine your future will strongly resemble that of a gerbil. A steady diet of raw veggies and plain water, and hours upon hours on the exercise wheel. Try not to let yourself wallow in such thoughts. Instead, focus on the wonderful gift you've been given. You might call it a dodged bullet, a second chance, or several years bought. Whatever you call it, you'll fare much better if you view yourself as lucky, rather than unlucky.
  • Pradaxa
    Pradaxa is prescribed to help reduce various kinds of blood clots and strokes in people with a-fib. This eMedTV page further explores this drug, with details on how it works as a "blood thinner," potential side effects, safety precautions, and more.
  • Pradaxa and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for women to take Pradaxa (dabigatran) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment further discusses the possible risks of using this medication while nursing, including information on whether Pradaxa passes through breast milk.
  • Pradaxa and Pregnancy
    Based on the results of animal studies, it may not be safe for pregnant women to take Pradaxa (dabigatran). This eMedTV Web page further discusses this topic, including information on why the FDA classifies this product as a pregnancy Category C drug.
  • Pradaxa Dosage
    For people with normal kidney function, the recommended Pradaxa dosage is 150 mg taken twice daily. As this eMedTV page explains, dosing guidelines for this medicine will be based mainly on kidney function. This page also lists tips for taking this drug.
  • Pradaxa Drug Interactions
    Certain blood thinners and P-glycoprotein inducer medications can negatively react with Pradaxa. This eMedTV resource outlines other Pradaxa drug interactions and describes some of the potentially serious complications these reactions can cause.
  • Pradaxa Medication Information
    Pradaxa is a medicine prescribed to prevent strokes and blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation. This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on Pradaxa, including how to take this medication and potentially serious side effects.
  • Pradaxa Overdose
    Easy bruising and vision changes are possible signs of a potentially serious Pradaxa (dabigatran) overdose. This eMedTV page lists other symptoms that may occur after taking too much of this drug, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • Pradaxa Side Effects
    Pradaxa can cause potentially serious problems, such as bleeding and allergic reactions. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at other side effects of Pradaxa, including common reactions and potentially life-threatening complications.
  • Pradaxa Uses
    Pradaxa is approved for preventing strokes and blood clots in certain kinds of people. This eMedTV page further describes uses of this drug, including unapproved uses. This article also offers a comparison of Pradaxa versus warfarin.
  • Pradaxa Warnings and Precautions
    If you have poor kidney function, you may not be able to safely take Pradaxa. This eMedTV page offers other precautions to be aware of before taking Pradaxa, including warnings for possible drug interactions and other potentially serious complications.
  • Pradexa
    As this eMedTV page explains, Pradaxa is used to prevent blood clots and strokes in people who have atrial fibrillation. This article discusses some general dosing guidelines and safety precautions. Pradexa is a common misspelling of Pradaxa.
  • Pralatrexate
    You may receive pralatrexate if peripheral T-cell lymphoma has come back or failed other treatment. This eMedTV Web page features an overview of this prescription chemotherapy drug, including how it works, safety precautions, and links to more details.
  • Pralatrexate and Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma
    As this eMedTV page explains, pralatrexate is a prescription drug that may sometimes be used to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma; however, this is an "off-label" (unapproved) use. Other off-label and approved pralatrexate uses are listed in this article.
  • Pralatrexate Dosage
    This eMedTV Web page gives details on how your healthcare provider will calculate the appropriate pralatrexate dosage for you. This article also explains how this drug is given, what to expect during treatment, and tips on how to minimize side effects.
  • Pralatrexate Dose
    The specific dose of pralatrexate you receive will be based largely on your height and weight. This eMedTV segment describes how your healthcare provider will calculate this amount and discusses what to expect with this form of chemotherapy treatment.
  • Pralatrexate Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers information on pralatrexate, a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat peripheral T-cell lymphoma in adults. This page gives an overview of side effects and general safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Pralatrexate Side Effects
    As this eMedTV resource explains, people who take pralatrexate may develop mouth sores, fever, low levels of blood cells, and other side effects. This article also describes potentially serious problems, which need to be treated right away.
  • Pramipexole
    Pramipexole is a dopamine agonist prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease and RLS. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at this medication, including information on how it works, when and how to take it, and possible side effects.
  • Pramipexole Dihydrochloride Information
    Are you looking for information on pramipexole dihydrochloride? This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of this dopamine agonist, with details on the symptoms it can treat, how many times a day it is taken, and more.
  • Pramipexole Dosing
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site discusses general pramipexole dosing guidelines for treating Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome. This page also provides suggestions for when and how to take this prescription medication.
  • Pramipexole ER
    Available by prescription, pramipexole ER is a drug used to treat Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this medication, including information on how it works, tips for when and how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Pramipexole ER Dosage
    When using pramipexole ER for Parkinson's disease, your dosage will be based on several factors. This eMedTV page describes the recommended starting amount for pramipexole ER, and outlines some tips for when and how to take this medicine.
  • Pramipexole ER Drug Information
    Pramipexole ER is a prescription medicine used to treat Parkinson's disease. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on pramipexole ER, explaining the drug's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Pramlintide
    Pramlintide is a prescription drug that can lower blood sugar in people with diabetes. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this medication, including information about how it works, side effects of the drug, how to take it, and more.
  • Pramlintide (Symlin)
    As this part of the eMedTV library explains, pramlintide (Symlin) is licensed to treat diabetes. This article takes a closer look at this drug, listing some of the precautions to be aware of before using it. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Pramlintide Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended starting pramlintide dosage is usually 15 mcg for type 1 diabetics and 60 mcg for type 2 diabetics. The dose is injected right before major meals. This Web page also features tips on taking the drug.
  • PrandiMet
    PrandiMet is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This selection from the eMedTV Web library features an overview of PrandiMet, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • PrandiMet Alternatives
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site features an in-depth look at some of the possible alternatives to PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin). This page also explains when it may be time to consider one of these PrandiMet alternatives.
  • PrandiMet and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article explains, one of the components in PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin) does pass through breast milk and could cause problems in a breastfed infant. This page further discusses the research on PrandiMet and breastfeeding.
  • PrandiMet and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explores studies on PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin) and pregnancy, explaining why the FDA classifies it as a pregnancy Category C medicine. This page also explains what to do if you are taking PrandiMet and pregnancy occurs.
  • PrandiMet Dosage
    This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that a doctor will consider several factors before recommending a PrandiMet dosage. This page discusses these factors that may affect your dosage, and provides some general PrandiMet dosing guidelines.
  • PrandiMet Drug Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend a product called PrandiMet. This eMedTV selection briefly describes this drug, with information on how it is taken and why PrandiMet may not be suitable in all cases.
  • PrandiMet Interactions
    Certain antibiotics, protease inhibitors, and digoxin are among the drugs that may interact with PrandiMet. This eMedTV Web article explores potential PrandiMet drug interactions, and describes the possible problems these interactions may cause.
  • PrandiMet Overdose
    This page from the eMedTV Web library describes possible PrandiMet overdose symptoms, such as blurry vision, seizures, and difficulty breathing. This page also discusses possible treatment options that are available.
  • PrandiMet Side Effects
    Some of the most common PrandiMet side effects can include headaches, nausea, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web resource also examines some of the more serious side effects of this drug, including symptoms of lactic acidosis and allergic reactions.
  • PrandiMet Uses
    This eMedTV segment discusses how PrandiMet is used for lowering blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This page further describes PrandiMet uses, including information on how the drug works and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • PrandiMet Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take PrandiMet if you have kidney disease or are taking certain medications. This eMedTV article discusses other important PrandiMet warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before taking the drug.
  • Prandin
    Prandin is a prescription drug that is used to improve insulin production in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works to control blood sugar and outlines some potential side effects and dosing guidelines.
  • Prandin (Repaglinide)
    This eMedTV Web page provides a basic description of Prandin (repaglinide), a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Topics discussed in this article include who can use it and possible side effects, with a link to learn more.
  • Prandin Alternatives
    This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at some of the Prandin alternatives available, such as lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications. This page also explains when an alternative to Prandin might be necessary.
  • Prandin and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, low and high blood sugar levels are possible effects of Prandin. Blood sugar levels can cause serious or even life-threatening complications, so this page also highlights some symptoms of high and low blood sugar.
  • Prandin and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article explores studies on Prandin and pregnancy, explaining why the FDA classifies it as a pregnancy Category C medication. Suggestions on what to do if pregnancy occurs while taking the drug are also provided.
  • Prandin Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains that, based on a blood sugar test, the recommended starting dose of Prandin can be 0.5 mg. This page outlines some tips on when and how to take the drug and also lists factors that will determine your Prandin dosage.
  • Prandin Drug Interactions
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explores potential Prandin drug interactions with other medications, such as sulfonamides, beta blockers, and salicylates. This page also explains the possible problems that these interactions may cause.
  • Prandin Overdose
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site describes common Prandin overdose symptoms, such as cold sweats, shakiness, and blurry vision. This page also outlines treatment options that are available, including supportive care.
  • Prandin Side Effects
    Some of the most common Prandin side effects can include headaches, low blood sugar, and a sinus infection. This eMedTV segment also examines some of the more serious side effects of this drug, including symptoms of high or low blood sugar and fever.
  • Prandin Uses
    This eMedTV resource describes how Prandin lowers blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes by increasing the production of insulin in the pancreas. This page also explains that there are no generally accepted off-label Prandin uses.
  • Prandin Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article provides several Prandin warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions, the risk of low blood sugar, and the danger of taking the drug when pregnant. This page also lists those who should not take it and why.
  • PrantiMet
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a healthcare provider may prescribe PrandiMet to treat type 2 diabetes. This article also covers some possible side effects and general precautions with the medication. PrantiMet is a common misspelling of PrandiMet.
  • Prasugrel
    A prescription drug, prasugrel helps prevent blood clots, strokes, and heart attacks after an angioplasty. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at this medication, including details on how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Prasugrel Dosage
    Your first prasugrel dose will be higher than those following it. This eMedTV segment discusses the dosing guidelines for this medication, listing helpful tips on taking it and explaining how your doctor will determine the amount to prescribe.
  • Prasugrel Drug Information
    This eMedTV article provides drug information on prasugrel, a medication used to prevent problems such as heart attacks and strokes in people who have had an angioplasty. This Web page also includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Pravachol
    Pravachol is a drug used to treat conditions such as high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this prescription statin drug, including its effects, dosages, potential side effects, and more.
  • Pravachol Alternatives
    As this eMedTV resource explains, there are many other cholesterol medicines in addition to Pravachol. Alternatives include other statins or cholesterol medications. This article explains these substitutes, such as fluvastatin, in detail.
  • Pravachol and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Pravachol does not recommend taking this drug while breastfeeding. This page from the eMedTV library contains more information on Pravachol and breastfeeding, and explains whether this medicine passes through breast milk.
  • Pravachol and Depression
    Depression is a side effect that occurs in less than 1 percent of people taking Pravachol. This eMedTV article discusses Pravachol and depression, including a list of possible symptoms, such as persistent sadness and decreased energy.
  • Pravachol and Joint Pain
    If you are taking Pravachol and joint pain occurs, there are at-home remedies you can use for pain relief. This eMedTV resource offers suggestions for treating joint pain, such as over-the-counter pain relief drugs, moist or dry heat, and cold packs.
  • Pravachol and Liver Problems
    Liver problems such as jaundice or hepatitis can occur as side effects of Pravachol and other statins. This eMedTV article offers an overview of Pravachol and liver problems, including a list of several symptoms that may indicate such problems exist.
  • Pravachol and Memory Loss
    Memory loss occurs in less than 1 percent of people taking Pravachol. This part of the eMedTV library offers an in-depth look at Pravachol and memory loss, including information on the research that has been done on memory loss and statins.
  • Pravachol and Weight Gain
    Weight gain does not appear to be a side effect of Pravachol. This selection from the eMedTV archives offers information on Pravachol and weight gain, including tips on what to do if this problem occurs while taking the drug.
  • Pravachol Medication
    High cholesterol can be treated with the prescription drug Pravachol. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at this medication, including a description of potential side effects. A link to more detailed information on Pravachol is also provided.
  • Pravachol Side Effects
    Common Pravachol side effects may include headache, common cold, and constipation. This eMedTV resource provides a list of common and uncommon side effects of this drug and also talks about the side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Pravacid
    Prevacid is a medication licensed to treat GERD, erosive esophagitis, and other conditions. This eMedTV page further explains what Prevacid is used for and describes how the drug works for these conditions. Pravacid is a common misspelling of Prevacid.
  • Pravastatin
    Pravastatin is a drug used to treat high cholesterol and other conditions related to heart disease. This eMedTV segment provides an in-depth look at this drug, with information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Pravastatin Side Effects
    Potential pravastatin side effects include nausea, headache, and diarrhea. This part of the eMedTV archives offers a more detailed list of possible side effects, including rare but serious problems such as insomnia, depression, and memory loss.
  • Pravastatin Sodium
    This eMedTV article takes a quick look at pravastatin, a prescription drug that is used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This Web page explains what else the medication can be used for and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Pravastatine
    Pravastatin is a medicine that can be prescribed to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV page offers more details on pravastatin and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Pravastatine is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravchol
    The prescription drug Pravachol is used for treating high cholesterol or triglycerides. This eMedTV page explains what to talk to your doctor about before using Pravachol and describes the drug's effects. Pravchol is a common misspelling of Pravachol.
  • Pravestatin
    Pravastatin is a drug licensed to treat conditions related to heart disease, such as high cholesterol. This eMedTV page covers other pravastatin uses and lists possible side effects of the medicine. Pravestatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravigil
    Provigil is used to promote wakefulness in people with narcolepsy, sleep apnea, or SWSD. This eMedTV page covers the effects of Provigil and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using the drug. Pravigil is a common misspelling of Provigil.
  • Pravistatin
    If you have high cholesterol or triglycerides, your doctor may give you pravastatin to lower these levels. This eMedTV page covers the effects, potential side effects, and other uses of this drug. Pravistatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravochol
    Pravachol is a cholesterol medication approved for adults and children ages 8 to 18. This eMedTV article covers other Pravachol uses, explains how the drug works, and lists its potential side effects. Pravochol is a common misspelling of Pravachol.
  • Pravostatin
    Pravastatin is a cholesterol medication that is available by prescription. This eMedTV resource further explains what pravastatin is used for and lists some of the drug's potential side effects. Pravostatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravstatin
    Pravastatin is a prescription drug used for treating high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV article explains how pravastatin works, explores its effects, and lists its possible side effects. Pravstatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pravustatin
    Pravastatin is a medicine commonly used for treating high cholesterol and triglycerides. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how pravastatin works and describes the effects of this drug. Pravustatin is a common misspelling of pravastatin.
  • Pre-Diabetes
    Pre-diabetes is diagnosed when blood glucose is higher than normal but not high enough to be diabetes. As this eMedTV resource explains, both forms of this condition can lead to an increased risk for heart attacks and strokes, among other conditions.
  • Pre-Diabeties
    Pre-diabetes is a condition where blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to be called diabetes. This eMedTV page lists the risk factors for this condition, as well as treatment options. Pre-diabeties is a common misspelling of pre-diabetes.
  • Pre-Diebetes
    People with pre-diabetes have high blood sugar and are at a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page lists the two forms of pre-diabetes and covers risk factors for the condition. Pre-diebetes is a common misspelling of pre-diabetes.
  • Pre-Diebetis
    People with pre-diabetes are at a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article describes this condition in more detail and explains what you can do to prevent or delay diabetes. Pre-diebetis is a common misspelling of pre-diabetes.
  • Pre-eclampsia
    Preeclampsia is a condition that occurs during pregnancy and causes decreased blood flow. This eMedTV segment discusses the risks associated with this condition and how it is typically treated. Pre-eclampsia is a common misspelling of preeclampsia.
  • Pre-natal Care
    As this eMedTV page explains, prenatal care is important to help treat or prevent any problems that may occur during your pregnancy. This page also includes a link to more detailed information. Pre-natal care is a common misspelling of prenatal care.
  • Pre-natal Vitamins
    Prenatal vitamins provide important vitamins and minerals for women who are pregnant. This eMedTV page discusses other uses of prenatal vitamins and also describes possible side effects. Pre-natal vitamins is a common misspelling of prenatal vitamins.
  • Preaclamsia
    As this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, preeclampsia is a narrowing of the blood vessels in pregnant women that can result in fetal complications like premature birth and stillbirth. Preaclamsia is a common misspelling of preeclampsia.
  • PreCare
    PreCare Premium and PreCare Chewables are prenatal vitamins that are available by prescription only. This eMedTV page offers an overview of these products, including information on the benefits of taking prenatal vitamins and general dosing tips.
  • PreCare Prenatal Vitamins
    As this eMedTV page explains, PreCare prenatal vitamins are no longer being manufactured. This article urges readers to talk their healthcare provider about a suitable alternative to PreCare and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Práva úcastníka studie
    Jako ú?astník klinické studie máte právo.
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