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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Plague Pictures - Postherpetic Neuralgia Symptoms

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Plague Pictures to Postherpetic Neuralgia Symptoms. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Plague Prevention
    This eMedTV Web page explains techniques for plague prevention that reduce the threat of infection in humans. For example, because there is no vaccine, antibiotics are often given to those who are in close contact with infected animals or people.
  • Plague Research
    Plague research is aimed at identifying genes in the bacteria that cause plague. This eMedTV resource outlines other areas of research, such as developing more promising treatment options and developing a vaccine against inhaled forms of the plague.
  • Plague Transmission
    This eMedTV Web page discusses the three forms of plague transmission and the bacteria that cause the disease. Transmission most often occurs through the bites of infected fleas; person to person transmission is extremely rare.
  • Plan B and Breastfeeding
    Plan B is considered safe for use in most women who are breastfeeding. Plan B, as this eMedTV page explains, should not affect the quantity or quality of breast milk. This page also covers what to tell your doctor before using Plan B when nursing.
  • Plan B and Pregnancy
    Plan B should not intentionally be used during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment further discusses Plan B and pregnancy, explaining why the pill is a pregnancy Category X medication. This page also covers why it won't disrupt an established pregnancy.
  • Plan B Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use Plan B if you have certain medical problems, such as diabetes. This eMedTV Web resource takes a closer look at other potential Plan B dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with this medication.
  • Plan B Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that your dosage of Plan B will vary based on the version you use. It will either be a one-time dosage of a single tablet, or it will be one tablet followed by another tablet twelve hours later.
  • Plan B Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions may occur when Plan B is taken with certain seizure medications, antibiotics, and other drugs. This page describes how some of these Plan B drug interactions could increase the risk of pregnancy.
  • Plan B Overdose
    Although an overdose of Plan B is unlikely, taking too much of this pill may cause nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV article gives more details on what to expect from a Plan B overdose and describes the treatment methods that may be considered.
  • Plan B Risks
    Potentially negative reactions to Plan B may include diarrhea, nausea, and headaches. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes other possible Plan B risks, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Plan B Safety Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, you may not be able to take Plan B if you have certain medical conditions. This page further discusses important safety information on Plan B, including what to tell your doctor before taking this contraceptive.
  • Plan B Uses
    Plan B is an emergency contraceptive that is used for preventing pregnancy after unprotected sex. This eMedTV page further discusses Plan B uses, including information on when to use it and details on how this "morning-after pill" works.
  • Plan B Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV resource explains, you should not take Plan B if you suspect that you may already be pregnant. This page provides several other Plan B warnings and precautions, including what to tell your doctor before using this contraceptive.
  • Planning Ahead for the Weekend (Combination Therapy)
    This video explains how planning ahead for the weekend can help you stick with your treatment plan.
  • Planning for a Cesarean Section
    This multimedia video discusses things to consider when planning for a cesarean section.
  • Plant Sterol Dosage
    Although there is no standard plant sterol dosage, the AHA recommends taking 2 grams daily. This eMedTV Web page also offers plant sterol dosing recommendations from the FDA and includes other information about plant sterol products.
  • Plant Sterol Drug Interactions
    Vitamin E, beta-carotene, and ezetimibe products may cause plant sterol drug interactions. This page from the eMedTV archives explains what may happen when these medications are taken together with plant sterol products.
  • Plant Sterol Overdose
    It is highly unlikely for someone to overdose on plant sterols. This section of the eMedTV library further explains why a plant sterol overdose is unlikely to occur and describes the treatment options that are available for an overdose (if necessary).
  • Plant Sterol Side Effects
    Potential plant sterol side effects include constipation, impotence, and heartburn. As this eMedTV page explains, side effects can be bothersome but are usually not serious. You should watch for signs of an allergic reaction while using plant sterols.
  • Plant Sterol Supplements
    This eMedTV article contains information on plant sterol supplements, which are used to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease. This resource explores the health claims for these supplements and includes a link to more information.
  • Plant Sterols and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if plant sterols from dietary supplements are safe for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV resource provides a more in-depth look at plant sterols and breastfeeding, and explains why plant sterols may cause problems in breastfeeding women.
  • Plant Sterols and Pregnancy
    Due to their effects on certain hormones, plant sterols may not be safe for use in pregnancy. This eMedTV page offers more information on plant sterols and pregnancy, further explaining why plant sterol supplements may not be safe for pregnant women.
  • Plaquenil and Breastfeeding
    When used for malaria, Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) appears to be safe for use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article offers more information on Plaquenil and breastfeeding, and explains whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Plaquenil Dosage
    For treating lupus, the recommended starting Plaquenil dosage is 400 mg once or twice a day. This eMedTV Web page also offers Plaquenil dosing guidelines for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and malaria (including malaria prevention).
  • Plaquenil Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Plaquenil interactions include digoxin, cyclosporine, and mefloquine. This eMedTV resource contains a more detailed list of drugs that may interact with Plaquenil and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Plaquenil Overdose
    A Plaquenil (hydroxychloroquine) overdose may cause drowsiness, headaches, or seizures. This page from the eMedTV library lists other potential effects of a Plaquenil overdose and describes various treatment options that are currently available.
  • Plaquenil Uses
    Plaquenil is used for treating and preventing certain types of malaria. As this eMedTV page explains, Plaquenil uses may also include the treatment of lupus and rheumatoid arthritis. Off-label uses of the drug are also listed in this article.
  • Plaquenil Warnings and Precautions
    Plaquenil can damage the retina of the eye, which can lead to blindness. This eMedTV page lists other side effects or complications that may occur with Plaquenil. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also listed on this page.
  • Plavix and Breastfeeding
    How safe is Plavix (clopidogrel bisulfate) for breastfeeding women? This eMedTV article talks about taking Plavix while nursing, including the manufacturer's recommendation and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Plavix Dosage
    The standard Plavix dosage is one 75 mg tablet taken once a day. This portion of the eMedTV library discusses other considerations to be aware of when using Plavix, such as taking the medication at the same time each day.
  • Plavix Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article explains, Plavix can possibly interact with several different types of medications (such as warfarin and NSAIDs), and some interactions may be dangerous. This page offers an in-depth look at possible Plavix drug interactions.
  • Plavix Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV article discusses warnings and precautions associated with taking Plavix. Before taking Plavix, precautions and warnings to be aware of include not taking the drug if you are experiencing any active bleeding (such as a stomach ulcer).
  • Plavix Uses
    Plavix uses include using the medication to help prevent blood clots in people who have had heart attacks. This eMedTV Web page looks at other uses of Plavix, such as helping to relieve pain in people with peripheral artery disease.
  • Playing the Blame Game
    Your partner without ADHD just doesn't understand. Your partner with ADHD just doesn't care. The cat looked at both of you funny. The planets are out of alignment. Stop blaming anything and everything else for problems in your relationship. This wastes time and will never lead to a resolution. Unless someone deliberately did something hurtful, stop trying to assign blame for the problem. Or if it is your fault, 'fess up and take ownership of it. Then work together to find a solution.
  • Please Don't Lie to Me
    We've heard all the lies. From the obvious ones (such as "My meds got stolen" and "I'm going on vacation") to the more clever ones. Sometimes we see otherwise honest and upstanding people lie because they are embarrassed or because the truth is difficult. For instance, if you think your kids are stealing your narcotics, please don't lie about needing more to control your pain. Like most healthcare professionals, I'll probably feel insulted when you lie to me. I'll wonder if you think I am unintelligent or naïve. You'll do much better if you always stick to the truth.
  • Plendil Dosage
    The recommended starting Plendil dosage for treating high blood pressure is 5 mg once a day. This eMedTV resource provides other Plendil dosing guidelines and outlines some suggestions for when and how to take the prescription medication.
  • Plendil Drug Interactions
    Some of the medicines that can cause Plendil drug interactions include beta blockers and some antibiotics. This eMedTV Web page contains a list of other drugs that may cause negative interactions with Plendil and explains the problems that may occur.
  • Plendil Medication Information
    If you have high blood pressure, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Plendil. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of Plendil, with information on what to expect, how to take it, and what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Plendil Uses
    Plendil is used for controlling high blood pressure in adults. This selection from the eMedTV library explains how this prescription medication works, discusses whether it is approved for use in children, and lists possible "off-label" Plendil uses.
  • Plendil Warnings and Precautions
    Plendil may cause fluid retention, which can be dangerous in people with congestive heart failure. This eMedTV segment lists other important Plendil warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before starting the drug.
  • Plenty of Vitamin D
    Consuming adequate amounts of calcium each day is only part of the story -- your body needs vitamin D to properly absorb it. Conveniently, nearly all milk sold in the United States is fortified with vitamin D. It's also added to some other dairy products, orange juice, soy milk, and cereals (check the labels). If you don't get enough from food or sunlight exposure, you may need supplements.
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, although there is only one standard dose for the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, the vaccination schedule will vary. The vaccine is given as one to four doses, depending on the person's age at the first dose.
  • Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Information
    This eMedTV article offers some basic information on the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, which is used to prevent pneumonia and other infections. This Web page covers side effects, safety warnings, and more.
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine
    The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is used to prevent pneumonia and other pneumococcal diseases. This eMedTV selection provides a complete overview of this vaccine, including dosing guidelines, potential side effects, and more.
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine is typically given as a single dose. This resource offers more details on dosing with the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine and explains why a second injection may be necessary.
  • Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine Information
    The pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine helps prevent pneumonia and bacteremia. This eMedTV page offers more information on the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, telling you what you need to know about its uses, how the product works, and more.
  • Pneumonectomy Alternatives
    If you decide against a pneumonectomy, alternatives available to you depend on the type of tumor you have. This eMedTV article provides a look at the most common alternatives to pneumonectomy: radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Pneumonectomy and the Operating Room
    Anesthesia is given before a pneumonectomy, and the operating room will have blankets in case you feel cold. This eMedTV page explains various things you may see or hear in the operating room, like monitors, tables of instruments, and beeping sounds.
  • Pneumonectomy Expectations
    In terms of recovery, pneumonectomy expectations depend on factors such as overall health and age. This eMedTV Web page discusses common expectations with regards to symptom relief and other results, as well as other factors that can affect this.
  • Pneumonectomy Information
    If you are looking for information on pneumonectomy, this eMedTV article is a great place to start. It talks about why the surgery is performed, what to expect, and more. Also included in this article is a link to more detailed information.
  • Pneumonectomy Recovery
    After a pneumonectomy, once your doctors feel that you are recovering as expected, you will be sent home. This eMedTV page explains what will happen after the surgery and offers tips to ensure a successful pneumonectomy recovery.
  • Pneumonectomy Risks
    What kinds of risks are associated with pneumonectomy? This eMedTV article has the answer. It gives a brief overview of this topic, with examples of both major and minor complications. Also included in this resource is a link to more info.
  • Pneumonectomy Surgery
    This eMedTV resource explains in detail what happens during a pneumonectomy surgery and discusses what happens afterwards. The surgery typically involves many steps, such as anesthesia, breathing tubes and catheters, and opening the rib cage.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the specific pneumonia vaccine dose each person receives will vary, depending on whether Prevnar 13 or Pneumovax is used. This article discusses the dosing guidelines for the different types of the vaccine.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine Drug Interactions
    Certain products may interfere with the pneumonia vaccine, including cortisone, Enbrel, and Prograf. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at drug interactions with the pneumonia vaccine and explains how you can lower your risk.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine Information
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the pneumonia vaccine helps prevent pneumonia, bacterial meningitis, and other infections. This article offers an overview of the pneumonia vaccine, with information on how to ensure your safety.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the pneumonia vaccine offers protection against bacterial meningitis, pneumonia, ear infections, and other conditions. This article takes an-depth look at the approved pneumonia vaccine uses and off-label indications.
  • Pneumonia Vaccine Warnings and Precautions
    As explained in this page of the eMedTV site, before receiving the pneumonia vaccine, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had a serious reaction to a vaccine before. This article provides important pneumonia vaccine precautions and warnings.
  • Pneumovax and Breastfeeding
    Like most vaccines, Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) is considered safe for nursing women. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on breastfeeding and Pneumovax, including what the Centers for Disease Control recommends.
  • Pneumovax and Pregnancy
    Pneumovax (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine) may be given to women who are expecting. This eMedTV selection discusses the safety issues surrounding Pneumovax and pregnancy, explaining why a healthcare provider may recommend it for a pregnant woman.
  • Pneumovax Dosage
    Pneumovax is typically given as a single dose. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, a second injection may be necessary in some cases. This article discusses the dosing guidelines for Pneumovax in more detail, including tips on timing your dosage.
  • Pneumovax Drug Interactions
    Anticoagulants such as warfarin or heparin can react negatively with Pneumovax. This eMedTV article tells you what you need to know about Pneumovax drug interactions, including a detailed list of medicines that can interfere with this vaccine.
  • Pneumovax Uses
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, Pneumovax can help prevent pneumonia and certain other conditions. This page takes a closer look what Pneumovax is used for, including an explanation of how the vaccine works.
  • Pneumovax Vaccination
    An injected vaccination, Pneumovax is used to prevent pneumonia, bacteremia, and other conditions. This eMedTV article briefly describes the vaccine, including a discussion on the age groups it is approved for. A link to more information is also included.
  • Pneumovax Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV article explains, it's usually a good idea to postpone your Pneumovax injection if you are moderately to severely ill. This page provides several Pneumovax precautions and warnings, including important issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Policosanol and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for breastfeeding women to use policosanol. This eMedTV page explains that no studies have been done on policosanol and breastfeeding, so it is not known if the supplement passes through breast milk or if it would cause problems.
  • Policosanol and Pregnancy
    It is not known if policosanol is safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource explains that there has not been enough research on policosanol and pregnancy, so it is probably a good idea for pregnant women to avoid this herbal supplement.
  • Policosanol Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that there are no established policosanol dosing guidelines, but some studies used a dosage of 5 mg to 10 mg twice daily for treating high cholesterol. This page also offers important tips on taking your policosanol dosage.
  • Policosanol Drug Interactions
    Policosanol drug interactions may increase your risk of bleeding. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how drug interactions with policosanol may occur if you take this supplement with aspirin, heparin, clopidogrel, or other medications.
  • Policosanol Overdose
    Potentially serious policosanol overdose symptoms may include internal bleeding. This eMedTV segment explores factors that may affect a policosanol overdose and covers the treatment options that are available if you take too much of the supplement.
  • Polidocanol Dosage
    It is important to stay moderately active for a few days after receiving a polidocanol dosage. This eMedTV Web page explains why, describes general dosing guidelines for this drug, and offers important precautions to implement after treatment.
  • Polidocanol Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page offers important information on the drug polidocanol, which is used to treat certain kinds of varicose veins. This page explains how the medicine works and what to look for when seeking this treatment from a healthcare provider.
  • Polio Incubation Period
    The time between polio transmission and the start of polio symptoms is called the polio incubation period. This eMedTV segment explains that this period can be as short as 4 days or as long as 35. This page discusses the incubation period in detail.
  • Polio Vaccine Precautions
    Some people, such as those who are allergic to certain antibiotics, should avoid the polio vaccine. As this eMedTV page explains, other people (such as those who are very ill) should simply wait. This page describes polio vaccine precautions.
  • Polycosonal
    Policosanol is a dietary supplement often used for treating high cholesterol. This eMedTV page lists conditions to tell your doctor about before using policosanol and explains how the product works. Polycosonal is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV page explains, to make a polycystic kidney disease diagnosis, a doctor may ask questions related to medical history (like whether you have a family history of any conditions) and order tests like an MRI or CT scan, among other things.
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease Genetics
    This eMedTV overview of polycystic kidney disease genetics describes how mutations in the PKD1, PKD2, and PKHD1 genes cause the two inherited forms of the disease. This page also lists causes of acquired cystic kidney disease, which isn't genetic.
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease Research
    As this eMedTV page explains, polycystic kidney disease research aims to better understand the genetics of the disease and find out if new treatments are safe and effective. This page outlines the possible benefits of taking part in clinical trials.
  • Polycystic Kidney Disease Types
    This page on the eMedTV Web site explores the three types of polycystic kidney disease -- autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and acquired cystic kidney disease -- and provides information on their causes, symptoms, and how often they occur.
  • Polyehtylene Glycol
    Polyethylene is an over-the-counter laxative used to treat constipation. This eMedTV page explains how this laxative works, lists possible side effects, and covers some dosing tips. Polyehtylene glycol is a common misspelling of polyethylene glycol.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended polyethylene glycol 3350 dosage for adults with occasional constipation is 17 grams of powder dissolved in a beverage and swallowed once a day. This page also offers some helpful tips on taking this laxative.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Drug Information
    Available without a prescription, polyethylene glycol 3350 is used to treat occasional constipation. This eMedTV page offers more information on this drug, including how polyethylene glycol 3350 works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Polyethylene Glycol 3350 Manufacturer
    Schering-Plough HealthCare Products is the manufacturer of polyethylene glycol 3350 (MiraLAX). This eMedTV segment also lists some of the manufacturers of the generic versions of this laxative. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Polyethylene Glycol and Bisacodyl Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl is a laxative used before colonoscopies. This article briefly describes polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl, and provides a link to more information.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution is prescribed to empty the bowels before certain procedures. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this laxative, including how it works, various products available, and tips on how to use it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Bisacodyl
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl is prescribed to prep the bowels for a colonoscopy. This eMedTV Web page further describes this laxative, with details on how it works, when and how to take it, safety precautions, and more.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Bisacodyl Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and bisacodyl dosage before having a colonoscopy is one bisacodyl tablet and two liters of the solution. This page also offers helpful tips on taking this laxative.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page explains that no studies have been done on using polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution while breastfeeding, and why problems are probably unlikely.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution and Pregnancy
    If I'm pregnant, can I take polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution? This eMedTV segment addresses this question, explaining why the FDA classifies this laxative as a pregnancy Category C drug and describes when a doctor may recommend it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses general dosing guidelines for using the various polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution products. This page explains how to mix the powder, how often to drink the solution, and other important tips for using this laxative.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Information
    Polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution is used to empty the bowels before gastrointestinal procedures. This eMedTV page offers important information on polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution, including how the laxative works and tips on using it.
  • Polyethylene Glycol Electrolyte Solution Overdose
    If you take too much polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution, it may cause vomiting and confusion. This eMedTV resource describes what else to expect with an overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider may treat any problems that occur.
  • Polymyalgia Rheumatica and Who It Affects
    White women over the age of 50 are at the greatest risk of being affected by polymyalgia rheumatica. This eMedTV article provides in-depth information on polymyalgia rheumatica and who it affects, as well as how it's related to temporal arteritis.
  • Polymyalgia Rheumatica Research
    Research on polymyalgia rheumatica is focused on the causes of the disorder, new treatments, and genetics. This eMedTV article discusses polymyalgia rheumatica research in detail, including potential benefits for participants.
  • Pomalidomide Dosage
    Pomalidomide capsules are taken once daily for 21 days, followed by a 7-day break from taking the drug. This eMedTV selection covers what to expect during treatment and includes an explanation of how your doctor will determine your pomalidomide dosage.
  • Pomalidomide Drug Information
    You may receive pomalidomide if you have a certain type of cancer called multiple myeloma. This eMedTV segment explores this chemotherapy drug, including information on pomalidomide's safety warnings and possible side effects.
  • Pomalidomide Side Effects
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, clinical studies have shown that side effects occur often in people taking pomalidomide. This page offers a detailed look at which reactions occur most frequently, along with those that are potentially dangerous.
  • Pomalyst
    Pomalyst is a medicine prescribed to treat multiple myeloma after at least two other treatments have failed. This eMedTV segment examines this prescription drug in more detail, with information on how it works, possible side effects, and other topics.
  • Pomalyst and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV segment explains why it may not be safe for women to use Pomalyst (pomalidomide) while breastfeeding. This article explains if any research has been done on this topic and whether it is known if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Pomalyst and Pregnancy
    The FDA has classified Pomalyst (pomalidomide) as a pregnancy Category X drug. This eMedTV Web page looks at the reasons why this drug should not be used by pregnant women. It also discusses the animal research that has been done on this topic.
  • Pomalyst Chemotherapy Information
    As this eMedTV article explains, Pomalyst is a medication used to treat multiple myeloma. This resource covers some important details on this chemotherapy drug, including how often Pomalyst is taken, possible side effects, and more.
  • Pomalyst Dosage
    As described in this eMedTV article, Pomalyst comes as a capsule that is taken once daily for 21 days, followed by a 7-day break in treatment. This resource explains how your dosage of Pomalyst is determined and discusses how long treatment lasts.
  • Pomalyst Drug Interactions
    Echinacea and even cigarettes may cause adverse reactions with Pomalyst. This eMedTV segment explains how products such as these, along with numerous medications and supplements, may cause serious drug interactions with Pomalyst.
  • Pomalyst Overdose
    As this page from the eMedTV Web library explains, overdosing on Pomalyst (pomalidomide) may cause problems like nausea, diarrhea, and bleeding problems. Other potential overdose symptoms, as well as treatment options, are discussed in this article.
  • Pomalyst Side Effects
    It is common for people to develop Pomalyst side effects, such as diarrhea, tiredness, and back pain. This eMedTV page examines many of the common reactions to Pomalyst, as well as the problems that are more serious and require prompt medical treatment.
  • Pomalyst Uses
    As this eMedTV resource explains, if you have multiple myeloma that has gotten worse after at least two other treatments, you may respond to Pomalyst. This page discusses uses for Pomalyst, including how it works and if it is safe for children.
  • Pomalyst Warnings and Precautions
    Pomalyst may cause bleeding problems, anemia, or infections in some people. This part of the eMedTV Web site focuses on the safety issues associated with Pomalyst, with details on important warnings and precautions to be aware of.
  • Pomegranate and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid large amounts of pomegranates if you are breastfeeding. This eMedTV page contains more detailed information on pomegranates and breastfeeding, and explains that a normal dietary intake of pomegranates may be safe.
  • Pomegranate and Pregnancy
    It is not known if it is safe to take a large amount of pomegranates during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page explores pomegranates and pregnancy in more detail, discussing the research that has been done on the topic and some general precautions.
  • Pomegranate Dosage
    Currently, there is no safe and effective pomegranate dosage established. This portion of the eMedTV library contains other important pomegranate dosing information and explains how to find a reputable manufacturer before buying pomegranate products.
  • Pomegranate Drug Interactions
    Negative interactions may occur if pomegranates are consumed in combination with certain medicines. This eMedTV page describes which medicines may lead to pomegranate drug interactions and discusses the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Pomegranate Overdose
    It is not known exactly what to expect from a pomegranate overdose. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains the factors that may affect a pomegranate overdose and describes the possible treatment options that are available.
  • Pomegranate Side Effects
    This eMedTV page explains that an allergic reaction is a possible side effect of pomegranates. This page describes possible signs and symptoms of an allergic reaction to pomegranates, and covers what to do if you experience pomegranate side effects.
  • Pomegrant
    This eMedTV page explains that pomegranates are a type of fruit that may have several health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol. This page also covers potential side effects and general precautions. Pomegrant is a common misspelling of pomegranate.
  • Pomelidomide
    As this eMedTV page explains, multiple myeloma may be treated with pomalidomide when at least two other anticancer drugs have been unsuccessful. This page covers dosing instructions and side effects. Pomelidomide is a common misspelling of pomalidomide.
  • Pomogranate
    This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of pomegranates, a type of fruit that may have several health benefits (such as treating high cholesterol). This page also covers some general precautions. Pomogranate is a common misspelling of pomegranate.
  • Pomogranite
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site features a brief overview of pomegranates, a fruit that may have several medicinal benefits. This article also provides a link to more detailed information. Pomogranite is a common misspelling of pomegranate.
  • Pomolidomide
    As this eMedTV article explains, people with multiple myeloma may benefit from treatment with pomalidomide. This resource gives a brief description of what to expect with this drug. Pomolidomide is a common misspelling of pomalidomide.
  • Ponatinib Dosage
    Ponatinib comes as a tablet that is taken once daily for the treatment of certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV page outlines specific ponatinib dosing guidelines, including an explanation on how your dosage is determined and tips on taking this drug.
  • Ponatinib Drug Information
    By slowing down the production of abnormal blood cells, ponatinib can treat certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV page explores this chemotherapy drug, including information on why it may not be safe for some people. It also links to more details.
  • Ponatinib Side Effects
    As this eMedTV resource explains, it is common for people who are taking ponatinib to develop side effects like fatigue, nausea, and constipation. This article examines the results of clinical studies, with detailed lists of common and serious reactions.
  • Ponstel and Pregnancy
    Doctors generally do not recommend Ponstel during pregnancy because of potential side effects to the fetus. This eMedTV segment discusses this issue in detail and also explains how the FDA's category system works.
  • Ponstel and Weight Gain
    Side effects are possible with Ponstel; weight gain, however, is a side effect that is reported rarely. This eMedTV resource explains what rapid weight gain with this drug may indicate and offers suggestions for helping with weight loss.
  • Ponstel Dosage
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