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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Oral Sex and Hepatitis C - Paliperidone (Invega)

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Oral Sex and Hepatitis C to Paliperidone (Invega). The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Oxazepam and Alcohol
    It is not recommended that you combine alcohol and oxazepam. As this eMedTV page explains, drinking alcohol while you are on oxazepam can raise your risk of side effects like drowsiness or memory problems -- and may also slow the heart and breathing.
  • Oxazepam and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that if you're taking oxazepam and breastfeeding at the same time, you should watch for side effects in your child. This page explains that oxazepam passes through breast milk and may cause problems in a breastfed infant.
  • Oxazepam and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page explains that you should talk with your doctor if you're taking oxazepam and pregnancy occurs (or you're thinking of becoming pregnant). Oxazepam is a pregnancy Category D drug, meaning it probably isn't safe for pregnant women.
  • Oxazepam Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, the suggested oxazepam dosage for most people going through alcohol withdrawal is 15 mg to 30 mg three to four times daily. This article also covers oxazepam dosing for anxiety treatment and gives tips on taking the drug.
  • Oxazepam Overdose
    Symptoms of an oxazepam overdose can include lethargy, confusion, and a coma. This eMedTV resource lists other possible overdose symptoms and explains that you should seek medical attention right away if you believe you may have overdosed on oxazepam.
  • Oxazepam Withdrawal
    This eMedTV segment explains that if you abruptly stop taking oxazepam, withdrawal symptoms (including confusion, insomnia, or sweating) can occur. This Web page covers other withdrawal symptoms and steps your doctor may take to prevent them.
  • Oxcarbazepine Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting oxcarbazepine dosage for adults and adolescents ages 16 and older is oxcarbazepine 600 mg total per day. This article also discusses oxcarbazepine dosing for children ages 2 to 16.
  • Oxcarbazepine Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents some basic drug information on oxcarbazepine, which is used to control a certain type of seizure in people with epilepsy. This article explains how this medicine works, common side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Oxcarbazepine Extended-Release
    Oxcarbazepine extended-release can help treat partial seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV Web page presents an overview of this prescription drug, including safety warnings, how it works, side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Oxcarbazepine Extended-Release Dosage
    This eMedTV selection discusses the dosing guidelines for oxcarbazepine extended-release, including how your doctor will determine the amount and how often it is taken. This resource also provides information on how these tablets should be taken.
  • Oxcarbazepine Extended-Release Information
    As explained in this eMedTV page, oxcarbazepine extended-release is a medicine prescribed to treat partial seizures. This article covers more information on oxcarbazepine extended-release, including warnings to be aware of with this anti-seizure drug.
  • Oxcarbazepine Extended-Release Side Effects
    Oxcarbazepine extended-release may cause potentially dangerous infections, bleeding, or other problems. This eMedTV resource examines other possible side effects of oxcarbazepine extended-release and lists those that require urgent medical care.
  • Oxtellar XR Alternatives
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, vigabatrin, valproic acid, and tiagabine are just a few of the alternatives to Oxtellar XR (oxcarbazepine extended-release). This article lists other options that are available if Oxtellar XR is not suitable for you.
  • Oxtellar XR and Breastfeeding
    It is known that Oxtellar XR (oxcarbazepine extended-release) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article offers an explanation on why the manufacturer of this drug usually recommends women not use Oxtellar XR while breastfeeding.
  • Oxtellar XR and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment discusses the safety concerns associated with using Oxtellar XR (oxcarbazepine extended-release) during pregnancy. It describes the serious complications that may occur and explains what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oxtellar XR Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, your age and various other factors will be used to determine your dosage of Oxtellar XR. This anti-seizure drug comes as tablets that are taken once a day on an empty stomach. More dosing tips are listed in this article.
  • Oxtellar XR Drug Interactions
    Serious interactions may occur if you combine Oxtellar XR with certain drugs or other products. This eMedTV page explains how birth control pills, cyclosporine, and various other medications can cause problems with Oxtellar XR.
  • Oxtellar XR Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is not exactly clear what to expect with an overdose on Oxtellar XR (oxcarbazepine extended-release). This article explains why this is the case and explains what to do if you believe you have taken too much of this drug.
  • Oxtellar XR Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV page, possible Oxtellar XR side effects include fatigue, headaches, and problems with balance. This article also lists warnings of potentially dangerous problems that can occur with this drug and require immediate treatment.
  • Oxtellar XR Uses
    Oxtellar XR is prescribed to treat partial seizures in adults and children as young as age six. This eMedTV article examines other possible uses for Oxtellar XR and gives a description of how the anti-seizure drug works.
  • Oxtellar XR Warnings and Precautions
    Drug interactions, allergic reactions, and other serious problems are associated with using Oxtellar XR. This eMedTV page presents a list of precautions and warnings to be aware of with Oxtellar XR, including details on who should not use this drug.
  • Oxybutynin Dosing
    The recommended oxybutynin dose for adults with bladder problems is 5 mg two to three times daily. This eMedTV segment also offers oxybutynin dosing guidelines for children and elderly people, and includes tips for when and how to take the drug.
  • Oxybutynin Drug Interactions
    Pramlintide, protease inhibitors, and certain antibiotics may interact with oxybutynin. This eMedTV resource lists other types of medications that may cause oxybutynin drug interactions and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Oxybutynin ER Dosing
    The recommended oxybutynin ER dose for adults is 5 to 10 mg once daily. This article from the eMedTV library also includes oxybutynin ER dosing guidelines for children with bladder problems due to neurological disorders.
  • Oxybutynin Gel
    Oxybutynin gel is a medication prescribed to treat an overactive bladder. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides a more in-depth look at this product, including information on dosing information, general precautions, and potential side effects.
  • Oxybutynin Gel Dosage
    There is only one dosage of oxybutynin gel for treating an overactive bladder. This eMedTV Web resource explains that the standard dosage of this drug is one packet applied to the skin of the stomach, upper arms, shoulders, or thighs once daily.
  • Oxybutynin Gel Information
    This page on the eMedTV site provides some basic information on oxybutynin gel, a drug used to treat an overactive bladder. This segment describes where and how to apply the drug and addresses important safety concerns to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oxybutynin Patch
    The oxybutynin patch can be prescribed to treat overactive bladder symptoms, such as urinary urgency. This eMedTV page explains when and how to use oxybutynin patches, describes the effects of the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Oxybutynin Patch Dosing
    The recommended oxybutynin patch dosage for overactive bladder treatment is one patch applied twice weekly. This eMedTV resource contains a list of oxybutynin dosing tips and suggestions for when and how to use the medication.
  • Oxycodone and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid taking oxycodone if you are nursing. This eMedTV page further explores breastfeeding and oxycodone, including details on how this medication passes through breast milk and the problems it may cause in a nursing baby.
  • Oxycodone and Constipation
    As this portion of the eMedTV Web library explains, constipation is a likely and expected side effect of oxycodone. This article also explains that if constipation occurs while taking oxycodone, you should talk to your doctor about using a laxative.
  • Oxycodone APAP Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic information about oxycodone/APAP, a prescription drug used to treat pain. This Web selection discusses the factors that will affect your dose, possible side effects, and more.
  • Oxycodone Drug Interactions
    Muscle relaxants, sleep medicines, or antidepressants may cause serious drug interactions with oxycodone. This eMedTV article lists other products that may interfere with oxycodone and describes the complications that these interactions may cause.
  • Oxycodone ER Dosage
    Since not everyone tolerates oxycodone ER the same, dosing must be individualized for each person. This eMedTV segment explains what your doctor may consider before recommending a dose of oxycodone ER and offers helpful tips on taking this medication.
  • Oxycodone ER Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxycodone ER is a medication approved to treat specific types of pain. This Web page takes a closer look at oxycodone ER, with information on the drug's side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Oxycodone Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, the primary uses of oxycodone are for treating short-term or long-term pain in adults. However, as this article points out, the drug can also be used "off-label" for pain relief in children or to treat shortness of breath.
  • Oxycodone Warnings and Precautions
    To ensure proper use of oxycodone, safety precautions for the drug should be reviewed with your doctor. This eMedTV resource contains important warnings and precautions for oxycodone, including information on who should not use this medication.
  • Oxycodone/APAP
    Moderate to moderately severe pain can often be treated with oxycodone/APAP. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides an in-depth look at this prescription drug, including how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Oxycodone/APAP and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page explains why it may not be safe to take oxycodone/APAP while breastfeeding. This page further discusses the risks of taking this medication and breastfeeding at the same time, and explains what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oxycodone/APAP and Pregnancy
    This article from the eMedTV archives explores the risks surrounding oxycodone/APAP and pregnancy. It describes the results of research studies on the topic and discusses circumstances in which the drug could be taken during pregnancy.
  • Oxycodone/APAP Dosage
    Several factors will affect your oxycodone/APAP dosage, such as other medications you are taking. This eMedTV resource provides general dosing guidelines for this prescription drug, including important safety precautions you need to be aware of.
  • Oxycodone/APAP Overdose
    Immediate treatment is essential for people who have overdosed on oxycodone/APAP. This page of the eMedTV Web site lists possible symptoms of an oxycodone/APAP overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • OxyContin and Breastfeeding
    OxyContin (oxycodone ER) is known to pass through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV resource offers more information on breastfeeding and OxyContin, and describes the potential problems that can occur if an infant is exposed to the drug.
  • OxyContin and Constipation
    Constipation is one of the most common side effects of OxyContin (oxycodone ER). This page on the eMedTV Web site offers more information on constipation and OxyContin, and explains how you can prevent or treat constipation while taking this narcotic.
  • OxyContin and Pregnancy
    Using OxyContin (oxycodone ER) during pregnancy may not be safe. As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on pregnancy and OxyContin show that the drug is unlikely to cause birth defects; however, it may cause narcotic withdrawal in newborns.
  • OxyContin Drug Interactions
    MAOIs, antihistamines, and various other medicines can potentially cause drug interactions with OxyContin. This eMedTV article lists other drugs that may interfere with OxyContin and describes the problems that may occur if these drugs are taken together.
  • OxyContin Oral
    There is only one form of OxyContin -- oral tablets designed to release the drug over a 12-hour period. This eMedTV article explains what OxyContin is used for, describes how it works, and lists some of the potential side effects of this medicine.
  • OxyContin Uses
    OxyContin is licensed to treat continuous, moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV Web page discusses the uses of OxyContin in more detail (including possible off-label uses), describes how the drug works, and explains whether it is approved for children.
  • OxyContin Warnings and Precautions
    If you have asthma, let your doctor know before taking OxyContin. This eMedTV segment lists important warnings and precautions with OxyContin, including other conditions you should tell your doctor about before using the drug.
  • Oxymetazoline Drug Information
    Available in the form of a nasal spray, oxymetazoline is a drug used to treat nasal congestion. This eMedTV segment offers a quick overview of this product, including information on why it shouldn't be used for more than three days at a time.
  • Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray
    Oxymetazoline nasal spray is a non-prescription drug used to treat nasal congestion due to various causes. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to use the spray.
  • Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if oxymetazoline nasal spray passes through breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web site further discusses oxymetazoline nasal spray and breastfeeding, including what to discuss with your doctor before using this drug and nursing a child.
  • Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray and Pregnancy
    The FDA has classified oxymetazoline nasal spray as a pregnancy Category C drug. This eMedTV resource further discusses using this medication during pregnancy, explaining the complications that may occur and when its use should be avoided.
  • Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard dose of oxymetazoline nasal spray for treating nasal congestion is two or three sprays in each nostril twice daily. This page lists other dosing tips and covers why you shouldn't use it for more than three days.
  • Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray Overdose
    As this eMedTV article explains, it is possible to overdose on oxymetazoline nasal spray. Overdose effects may include nausea, increased heart rate, and drowsiness. Seek prompt medical care if you or someone else has taken too much of this nasal spray.
  • Oxymorphone ER Dosage
    Your doctor will take several factors into account when determining your oxymorphone ER dosage. This eMedTV page offers an explanation of some of these considerations that may affect your dose and lists important tips for taking this drug safely.
  • Oxymorphone ER Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource features information on oxymorphone ER, a prescription medication used for the long-term treatment of pain. This page covers safety precautions, abuse potential, and how to take it. A link to more details is also included.
  • Oxymorphone ER Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported oxymorphone ER side effects include drowsiness, constipation, and nausea. This eMedTV segment offers an overview of other possible reactions, listing common ones as well serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Oxytocin Dosage
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at why the oxytocin dosage varies from woman to woman. It also provides specific dosing guidelines for various uses of this drug, with a list of considerations to keep in mind when receiving this medication.
  • Oxytocin Medication Information
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, oxytocin is given to help cause or improve uterine contractions. This article presents more information on oxytocin, including when this medication is prescribed, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • Oxytrol and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid breastfeeding while using Oxytrol. This article from the eMedTV archives provides more information on Oxytrol and breastfeeding, including information on whether the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Oxytrol and Constipation
    Oxytrol may potentially cause constipation. This segment from the eMedTV Web site covers Oxytrol and constipation in more detail, discusses how common this side effect appears to be, and explains what you can do if constipation occurs.
  • Oxytrol and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is one of the most common side effects of Oxytrol. This portion of the eMedTV library explores the link between Oxytrol and dry mouth in more detail and provides a list of suggestions to help with a dry mouth.
  • Oxytrol and Pregnancy
    Oxytrol is most likely safe for use in pregnant women, but the full risks are not yet known. This eMedTV article contains more detailed information about Oxytrol and pregnancy, and explains what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Oxytrol Dosage
    There is only one standard Oxytrol dosage -- one patch applied every three to four days. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers other Oxytrol dosing information and includes a list of suggestions for how, when, and where to apply the patch.
  • Oxytrol Drug Interactions
    Anticholinergics, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, and pramlintide may cause Oxytrol drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists specific types of anticholinergic drugs and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that may interact negatively with Oxytrol.
  • Oxytrol For Women Dosage
    Oxytrol For Women patches are applied every four days to treat an overactive bladder. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at specific Oxytrol For Women dosing guidelines and also offers tips on how to effectively and safely use this medicine.
  • Oxytrol For Women Drug Interactions
    Several products can cause Oxytrol For Women drug interactions, including Benadryl and Tylenol PM. This eMedTV page outlines other medications that can cause negative reactions with Oxytrol For Women and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Oxytrol For Women Patch Information
    Oxytrol For Women is a nonprescription medicine used to treat an overactive bladder in adult women. This eMedTV Web page features more information on Oxytrol For Women, including side effects of the patch, safety issues to be aware of, and more.
  • Oxytrol For Women Side Effects
    Dry mouth, constipation, and diarrhea are some of the potential Oxytrol For Women side effects. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at other possible problems, including potentially serious reactions that may require immediate medical care.
  • Oxytrol For Women Uses
    If you are an adult woman with an overactive bladder, you may benefit from Oxytrol For Women. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at uses for Oxytrol For Women, including how this nonprescription medication works and who it is designed for.
  • Oxytrol For Women Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Oxytrol For Women if you have glaucoma or certain other medical conditions. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important warnings and precautions with Oxytrol For Women to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Oxytrol Overdose
    Dry eyes, severe constipation, and difficulty urinating are possible signs of an Oxytrol overdose. This eMedTV page describes overdose treatment options that are available and lists other symptoms that may occur as a result of taking too much Oxytrol.
  • Oxytrol Side Effects
    Vision changes, diarrhea, and dry mouth are some of the most common Oxytrol side effects seen in studies. This eMedTV page describes other common side effects of Oxytrol and also lists potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Oxytrol Uses
    Oxytrol is used for treating urinary incontinence, urinary urgency, and other overactive bladder symptoms. This eMedTV resource further explains what the medicine is used for and discusses Oxytrol uses in children.
  • Oxytrol Warnings and Precautions
    Oxytrol could potentially make glaucoma worse. This segment from the eMedTV site lists other Oxytrol warnings and precautions that you should be aware of before starting treatment and includes information on who should not use the Oxytrol patch.
  • Ozurdex and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV segment talks about breastfeeding and Ozurdex, explaining why problems are unlikely -- and why it's still important to talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Ozurdex and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page discusses the potential risks of using Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) during pregnancy. This page covers the effects of the drug on offspring in animal studies and explains when it may be recommended for pregnant women.
  • Ozurdex Dosage
    This portion of the eMedTV library provides dosing guidelines for Ozurdex, a prescription eye medication. It explains how the implant is administered, discusses follow-up care, and explains what to do if you have any questions about your dose.
  • Ozurdex Drug Interactions
    Medications that can react with Ozurdex include Acuvail, Nevanac, and other NSAID eye medicines. This eMedTV segment outlines other drugs that can interact with Ozurdex and describes the potential consequences of these reactions.
  • Ozurdex Medication Information
    If you have macular edema from retinal vein occlusion, your healthcare provider may recommend Ozurdex. This eMedTV selection offers important information on Ozurdex, listing some of the medication's side effects and providing a link to more details.
  • Ozurdex Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, using too much Ozurdex (dexamethasone intravitreal implant) could lead to eye pain, blurred vision, and other symptoms. This article offers more overdose information on this steroid eye medication.
  • Ozurdex Side Effects
    Eye redness, cataract, and increased pressure in the eye are some of the possible reactions to Ozurdex. This eMedTV Web article lists other side effects of Ozurdex, including potentially dangerous reactions that require immediate medical care.
  • Ozurdex Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ozurdex is approved to reduce the inflammation associated with macular edema caused by retinal vein occlusion. This article also lists other uses for Ozurdex and gives a complete overview of how it works and who can use it.
  • Ozurdex Warnings and Precautions
    After receiving the Ozurdex implant, it's important to keep all of your follow-up appointments. This eMedTV segment explains why and lists several other warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting treatment with Ozurdex.
  • Pacemaker Placement
    This video discusses what happens during a pacemaker placement.
  • Pacemaker Placement - Presentation Summary
    This video provides a summary of what to expect with the implantable device.
  • Pacemaker Placement Complications -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • Pacemaker Placement Leaving the Hospital - Information for Diabetics
    This video lists potentially serious symptoms that diabetics should be aware of after EPS.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Allergic Reaction To Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Bleeding Problems
    This clip explains the bleeding problems that can be associated with blood-thinning drugs.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Blood Clots
    This video clip gives an overview of blood clots, including how they are treated.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Blood Vessel Injuries
    Blood clots and ongoing bleeding are two of the blood vessel problems that can occur with this procedure. This video clip talks in detail about these and other problems.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Breathing Problems Requiring a Ventilator
    This multimedia clip talks about some of the breathing problems that may require the use of a ventilator.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Heart Attack
    This interactive clip talks about the risk of heart attack during this procedure.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Heart Injury
    This clip deals with some of the heart injuries that can occur with this procedure.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Infection
    This video clip discusses the risk of infection that is present with this procedure.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Irregular Heartbeats
    This clip explains why irregular heartbeat occurs with the procedure and how it's handled.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Loss of Life
    This video clip discusses the risk of loss of life that is associated with this procedure.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Lung Problems, Including Pneumonia
    This video clip covers some of the possible lung problems that can occur with the placement of this device.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Medical Equipment Failure
    This clip describes the way medical equipment can fail.
  • Pacemaker Placement Risks -- Stroke
    Strokes are another possible complication of this procedure. This video clip offers an overview of this complication.
  • Pacerone and Breastfeeding
    Pacerone does pass through human breast milk in amounts that are large enough to affect a nursing child. This eMedTV article examines the potential safety issues that may occur when Pacerone is taken while breastfeeding and what your doctor may advise.
  • Pacerone and Pregnancy
    There are numerous complications that can occur when Pacerone is taken during pregnancy, as explained in this eMedTV segment. This article describes what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals and covers other safety concerns.
  • Pacerone Dosage
    This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at individual dosing guidelines for Pacerone, including details on recommended starting amounts and factors that may affect your dosage. This article also offers some helpful tips for taking the drug properly.
  • Pacerone Drug Interactions
    Careful monitoring and dosing adjustments may be necessary if you take Pacerone with certain medications. This eMedTV segment examines some of the many drug interactions that can occur with Pacerone and describes the problems these reactions can cause.
  • Pacerone Overdose
    This part of the eMedTV Web library takes a look at some of the potentially dangerous and even life-threatening complications that can occur if someone overdoses on Pacerone. A list of possible overdose effects and treatment options is also included.
  • Pacerone Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Pacerone is used to treat potentially fatal heart rhythm problems in adults. This page examines specific uses of Pacerone, including who can benefit from this drug and how it works to control an irregular heartbeat.
  • Pacerone Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page discusses who should not take Pacerone and describes some of the potentially dangerous complications this medication can cause. A detailed list of a number of warnings and precautions for using Pacerone safely is also included.
  • Paclitaxel Chemotherapy Cancer Treatment
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, paclitaxel is type of chemotherapy used to treat cancer. This Web page gives a basic overview of this drug, explaining how it is given and including a link to more detailed information.
  • Paclitaxel Dosing
    The paclitaxel dose varies for each person, depending on the type of cancer and other drugs you are taking. This eMedTV Web page further explores paclitaxel dosing, including information on how and where you can get your paclitaxel infusion.
  • Pain and Swelling -- ACL Surgery (Hamstring Graft)
    This clip features information about pain and swelling after the procedure.
  • Pain and Swelling After ACL Reconstruction
    It is normal to experience pain and swelling after ACL reconstruction. This portion of the eMedTV Web site discusses how the pain will improve over time with physical therapy and explains that permanent pain is extremely rare.
  • Pain With Hardware -- Ankle Surgery Complications
    This video explains what your doctor may do if you experience pain caused by hardware.
  • Pain With Urination
    Not only can pain with urination be a sign of BPH, but it can also be an indication that there may be a urinary tract infection. Specifically, if you notice burning while you urinate or see blood in your urine, contact your healthcare provider right away. Pain can also occur when urine collects in the bladder and causes irritation. Your healthcare provider can help determine the cause of your pain and recommend treatment options.
  • Palgic and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Palgic recommends that nursing women should never take the medication. This eMedTV article provides more information about breastfeeding and Palgic, and explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • Palgic and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is unknown if Palgic is safe for use during pregnancy. This segment from the eMedTV library offers a more in-depth look at pregnancy and Palgic, and explains what doctors will consider before recommending this drug to pregnant women.
  • Palgic Dosage
    The standard dosage of Palgic for adults is one or two tablets (4 or 8 mg) three to four times daily. This eMedTV resource also explains how dosing works for children and offers important tips and precautions for using this medication.
  • Palgic Drug Interactions
    Pramlintide and phenothiazines are some of the medicines that may lead to drug interactions with Palgic. This eMedTV segment describes the potential effects of these interactions and lists other drugs that may interact with the allergy medicine.
  • Palgic Medication Information
    This eMedTV article offers some basic information on Palgic, a medication used to treat a wide variety of allergies. This page covers side effects, safety warnings, and factors that will affect your dose. A link to more detailed information is also given.
  • Palgic Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, an overdose with Palgic may cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, hyperactivity, and hallucinations. This article talks more about the overdose symptoms and lists several treatment options.
  • Palgic Side Effects
    Sedation, dizziness, and heartburn are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Palgic. This eMedTV article lists other common side effects of the drug and explains which problems are potentially serious and require medical attention.
  • Palgic Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Palgic is a drug that treats many types of allergies, including respiratory, skin, and eye allergies. This article provides a list of approved uses for Palgic, explains how the drug works, and discusses its use in children.
  • Palgic Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Palgic if you are breastfeeding. This eMedTV page offers more information on who should not take this drug. Warnings and precautions on Palgic's side effects are also included in this article.
  • Paliperidone (Invega)
    People with schizophrenia may benefit from paliperidone (Invega), a prescription medication. This eMedTV Web article gives an overview of this medicine, listing some of its potential side effects and explaining when and how to take it.
  • About Oralia
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Oralia. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Oralia.
  • Information About Oralie
    This eMedTV Web page highlights information about the name Oralie. This may include information about variations, and meaning.
  • Oran Name Information
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview of the name Oran, including its origin and meaning.
  • About Orana
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orana. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orana.
  • Orange -- Meaning, Origin, and/or Other Information
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orange. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orange.
  • About Orazio
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview of the name Orazio, including its origin and meaning.
  • Information About Orcus
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orcus. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orcus.
  • Orelia Information -- Meaning, Origin, and/or Other Information
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orelia. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orelia.
  • About Oren
    The origin of Oren is Hebrew and Irish Gaelic. This eMedTV segment explains other information related to the name Oren, including its meaning and other forms.
  • Information About Orene
    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orene. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orene.
  • About the Name Oreste
    This eMedTV Web page highlights information about the name Oreste. This may include information about variations, and meaning.
  • Orestes Information -- Meaning, Origin, and/or Other Information
    What Does Orestes mean? As this eMedTV Web page explains, Orestes means "Mountain man." This page also highlights other information related to the name Orestes.
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    This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview of the name Orestis, including its origin and meaning.
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    Ori means "Dawn, goddess of dawn." This page of the eMedTV library provides more information related to the name Ori.
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    This eMedTV Web page explains name information related to Orian. This includes the meaning, origin, and other forms of Orian.
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