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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Oral Sex and Hepatitis C - Paliperidone (Invega)

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Oral Sex and Hepatitis C to Paliperidone (Invega). The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Oral Tranexamic Acid
    As a prescription medication, oral tranexamic acid is used to treat heavy menstrual bleeding. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this product, including information on how it works, side effects, and safety issues to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oral Tranexamic Acid Dosage
    This part of the eMedTV site explains that according to the guidelines for oral tranexamic acid dosing, women with kidney problems may require a lower dosage of the drug. This Web page offers more details on when and how to take oral tranexamic acid.
  • Oral Tranexamic Acid Information
    Are you looking for information on oral tranexamic acid? This eMedTV segment is a great place to start. It explains what this drug is used for, how it works, and when it should be taken. This page also covers what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Orally Disintegrating Alprazolam
    Orally disintegrating alprazolam is a prescription drug used to treat anxiety and panic disorder. This eMedTV article provides more information about the uses and effects of this drug, and also covers dosing guidelines and potential side effects.
  • Orally Disintegrating Alprazolam Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, your age and the other medications you are taking are some of the factors that will help determine your orally disintegrating alprazolam dose. This page discusses dosing guidelines for treating anxiety and panic disorder.
  • Orally Disintegrating Alprazolam Information
    This eMedTV article offers important information on orally disintegrating alprazolam, a drug used to treat anxiety and panic disorder. This page also covers some general dosing guidelines and explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone.
  • Orally Disintegrating Carbidopa-Levodopa
    Orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa is prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa, including information on its other uses, how it works, and possible side effects.
  • Orally Disintegrating Carbidopa-Levodopa Dosage
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site discusses the factors that may affect your orally disintegrating carbidopa-levodopa dosage (such as other medications you are taking). This page also gives suggestions on when and how to take this medication.
  • Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide
    Conditions such as GERD and diabetic gastroparesis can be treated with orally disintegrating metoclopramide. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed overview of this drug, with information on when and how to take it, side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide Dosage
    Orally disintegrating metoclopramide tablets are taken four times a day, 30 minutes before a meal. This eMedTV Web page provides detailed orally disintegrating metoclopramide dosing information, with tips that can help ensure a safe treatment process.
  • Orally Disintegrating Metoclopramide Information
    Orally disintegrating metoclopramide is used for certain conditions affecting the gastrointestinal tract. This eMedTV selection provides important information on this drug, such as what to tell your healthcare provider before beginning treatment.
  • Orally Disintegrating Phentermine
    Orally disintegrating phentermine is a weight loss product available only with a prescription. This eMedTV page looks at several aspects of this product, including when a doctor may prescribe it, how it is used, potential side effects, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Phentermine Dosage
    Orally disintegrating phentermine is taken once daily to help with weight loss. This eMedTV segment examines how dosing is determined for orally disintegrating phentermine, and describes why this product is for short-term use only.
  • Orally Disintegrating Phentermine Information
    This eMedTV page contains information on how orally disintegrating phentermine may be an effective weight loss product for some people. This article also covers how this drug works, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • Orally Disintegrating Phentermine Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV page, using orally disintegrating phentermine may cause side effects like insomnia, diarrhea, and dizziness. Other possible reactions are examined in this article, including those requiring immediate medical care.
  • Orally Disintegrating Selegiline
    Orally disintegrating selegiline is a prescription drug used for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV page explores orally disintegrating selegiline, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Orally Disintegrating Selegiline Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses factors that may affect your orally disintegrating selegiline dosage, such as your response to the medication and other medications you are taking. This page also gives tips on when and how to take this medication.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol
    Orally disintegrating tramadol is a prescription pain medication. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this drug, with information on what type of pain it is approved to treat, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, orally disintegrating tramadol is usually taken two to four times a day. This Web page explains the dosing guidelines for orally disintegrating tramadol, explaining why it's important to start with a low amount.
  • Orally Disintegrating Tramadol Information
    If you are an adult with mild-to-moderate pain, your doctor may recommend orally disintegrating tramadol. This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on this drug, including how it is taken, what to expect during treatment, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Vardenafil
    Orally disintegrating vardenafil is a drug that treats erectile dysfunction. This page of the eMedTV site offers an in-depth look at this medication, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Orally Disintegrating Vardenafil Dosage
    As this eMedTV page discusses, the dose of orally disintegrating vardenafil is the same for everyone -- one tablet taken one hour before sexual activity. This page explains that you shouldn't take more than one tablet daily and lists other important tips.
  • Oramorph Abuse
    This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate ER) abuse. This article explains the difference between Oramorph SR abuse and a physical dependence on the drug, and also discusses how to treat an addiction to the drug.
  • Oramorph and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page takes a look at issues surrounding Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate ER) and breastfeeding. It explains the manufacturer's recommendations and describes the potentially serious complications the drug could cause in a breastfed infant.
  • Oramorph and Constipation
    Constipation is a likely and expected side effect of Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate ER). This eMedTV resource offers more information on Oramorph SR and constipation, including why it is likely to occur and treatment options your doctor may recommend.
  • Oramorph and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explores risks associated with Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate ER) and pregnancy. This page describes the effects the drug caused when given to pregnant animals and explains when a doctor may recommend Oramorph SR to a pregnant woman.
  • Oramorph Dosage
    Oramorph SR comes in the form of an extended-release tablet and is usually taken two or three times daily. This eMedTV resource describes the factors that may affect your Oramorph SR dosage, and offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Oramorph Drug Interactions
    Oramorph SR can cause serious side effects if it is combined with certain medications. This eMedTV Web page provides an in-depth look at the medications that can cause Oramorph SR drug interactions and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Oramorph Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on Oramorph SR (morphine sulfate ER). This eMedTV Web resource lists possible symptoms of an Oramorph SR overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Oramorph Side Effects
    Although most people do not have problems with Oramorph SR, side effects are possible. This eMedTV segment lists some of the more common side effects of Oramorph SR, as well as potentially serious side effects that may require medical attention.
  • Oramorph SR Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on Oramorph SR? This eMedTV segment explains what you need to know about this drug, including what it is used for, possible side effects, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Oramorph Uses
    Oramorph SR is a prescription medication used to treat chronic pain. This eMedTV Web article further discusses what Oramorph SR is used for, including how the medication works to gradually release morphine and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • Oramorph Warnings and Precautions
    People who have lung disease, BPH, or kidney disease may not be able to safely take Oramorph SR. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at other important Oramorph SR warnings and precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment with the medication.
  • Oramorph Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV segment explains, symptoms of Oramorph SR (morphine ER) withdrawal are not necessarily a sign of abuse, as the body becomes dependent on the drug even with legitimate use. This page lists possible symptoms and explains how to avoid them.
  • Orap and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, there may be risks associated with breastfeeding during treatment with Orap (pimozide). This page examines whether this drug passes through breast milk and what you should discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Orap and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page discusses the safety concerns associated with using Orap (pimozide) during pregnancy, including details on why this drug should only be given to a pregnant woman if the benefits outweigh the risks. Potential problems are also covered.
  • Orap Dosage
    The initial recommended dosing regimen for Orap is determined by your age, weight, and other factors. This eMedTV resource examines the dosing guidelines for this prescription drug and explains why you should not stop taking it even if you feel better.
  • Orap Drug Interactions
    Combining Orap with certain products can cause changes in heart rhythm, drowsiness, or other complications. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at possible Orap drug interactions and describes the potentially serious problems that may occur.
  • Orap Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource explains why people who have Tourette syndrome may benefit from Orap. More information on this medication is included in this article, including details on beneficial effects, dosing instructions, and possible side effects.
  • Orap Overdose
    This eMedTV Web page explains that a coma, heart problems, and other serious complications could occur if you take too much Orap (pimozide). It lists other possible overdose symptoms and explains why you should seek immediate medical treatment.
  • Orap Side Effects
    Weakness and lack of energy are among the most commonly reported Orap side effects. This eMedTV Web selection presents a detailed list of other reactions caused by this drug, including potentially dangerous complications that require treatment.
  • Orap Uses
    By affecting certain brain chemicals, Orap is used to treat severe tics due to Tourette syndrome. This eMedTV page explains how using this medicine when other treatments have failed may be effective for adults and children as young as age 12.
  • Orap Warnings and Precautions
    If you have certain heart rhythm problems or low electrolytes, you may not be able to take Orap. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at important safety warnings and precautions, with details on potentially dangerous complications of Orap.
  • Orencia and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Orencia should be taken while breastfeeding. As this eMedTV article explains, while no human studies have been conducted on Orencia and breastfeeding, the drug was shown to pass through breast milk in rats.
  • Orencia and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Orencia during pregnancy are not yet known. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this topic, including an explanation of the possible effects that may occur in fetuses exposed to large doses of the drug.
  • Orencia Dosage
    For people who weigh less than 132 pounds, the recommended Orencia dose is 500 mg. This part of the eMedTV archives provides dosing guidelines for other weight groups and includes information on when and how to receive your dosage.
  • Orencia Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may interact with Orencia include TNF inhibitors, anakinra, and "live" vaccines. This eMedTV page describes what may happen if these drugs are taken with Orencia and explains how you can help prevent Orencia drug interactions.
  • Orencia for Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV page explains that when considering treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, Orencia may be recommended when certain other medications have failed. This page describes how this drug performed in clinical studies and includes a link to learn more.
  • Orencia Side Effects
    Common Orencia side effects may include indigestion, high blood pressure, and infections. This eMedTV Web page lists other common side effects and also includes a list of potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Orencia Uses
    Rheumatoid arthritis in adults is commonly treated with Orencia. As this eMedTV article explains, however, it can also be used to treat other conditions. "Off-label" Orencia uses may include the treatment of multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, and lupus.
  • Orencia Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Orencia if you are allergic to any active or inactive components of the drug. This eMedTV page contains other Orencia warnings and precautions, and lists potential side effects or complications to look out for during treatment.
  • Organ Damage (Laparoscopy For Ectopic Pregnancy Risks)
    This video explains possible organ damage that can occur during any abdominal surgery.
  • Organ Injury -- Abdominal Hysterectomy Risks
    This video segment discusses the risk of organ injury occurring with an abdominal hysterectomy.
  • Organ Injury After Off-Pump Bypass Surgery
    There is a possibility, although rare, of organ injury after off-pump bypass surgery. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers information on this potential complication, which can take the form of damage to the heart, lungs, throat, or nerves.
  • Organ Injury From Laparoscopic Surgery
    In rare cases, organ injury during laparoscopic surgery may occur. As this eMedTV Web page explains, organ injury can occur in the intestines, bladder, ovaries, uterus, or other organs. Treatment options for this type of injury are also described.
  • Organ Injury With a Laparoscopy for Endometriosis
    Organ injury with a laparoscopy for endometriosis is a rare, but possible, complication. As this eMedTV Web page describes, organ injury with this procedure can involve damage to organs such as the intestines, bladder, and uterus.
  • Organ Injury With a Myomectomy
    A possible complication of any abdominal surgery is organ injury. With a myomectomy, as this eMedTV article points out, the chance of an organ injury occurring is very small, due to the nature of the procedure.
  • Organ Injury With Cesarean Section
    The information presented in this eMedTV Web page discusses the possible types of organ injury with cesarean section (for example, damage to the intestines or ovaries) and how the injuries are typically treated.
  • Organ Injury With Laparoscopy
    Organ injury during laparoscopy can damage the ovaries, uterus, and other organs, but this is very rare. This eMedTV Web page discusses organ injury from a laparoscopy and its potential complications.
  • Organ Injury With Tubal Ligation
    Organ injury can occur with tubal ligation, possibly damaging organs such as the uterus and bladder. As this eMedTV resource explains, organ injury with tubal ligation is rare and, in most cases, quickly and easily healed.
  • Organizational Disarray
    Adults with ADHD often live disorganized lives, both in terms of physical organization (they often have messy houses) and time-management and task-planning organization.
  • Organize Your Bills
    Pick a spot that you will pass on a daily basis -- perhaps the front door or a spot on the kitchen counter -- and put a basket or folder there. Get in the habit of checking the mail every day and immediately dealing with it. Throw junk mail in the recycle bin. Put the bills in the basket. People with ADHD struggle with organization, so to make things even simpler, consider signing up to receive your bills via e-mail or for online bill pay.
  • Orlistat Dosing
    Although everyone takes the same dose of orlistat, there are things you can do to ensure effective results. This eMedTV article offers helpful tips on orlistat dosing, including when and how to take the drug to get the most out of it.
  • Orsythia Birth Control Information
    Are you looking for information on using Orsythia for birth control? This segment of the eMedTV archives explains how this drug works to prevent pregnancy and what to discuss with your healthcare provider, with a link to learn more.
  • Orsythia Dosage
    As this page of the eMedTV site explains, Orsythia dosing is the same for all women, regardless of medical conditions or any other factors. One tablet should be taken every day, preferably at the same time each day, to ensure the drug's effectiveness.
  • Orsythia Side Effects
    In general, most women don't experience any Orsythia side effects, or they only have minor reactions. This eMedTV resource lists common side effects seen with this oral contraceptive as well as potentially serious problems that require medical care.
  • Ortho Evra and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid combined contraceptives (such as Ortho Evra) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource further discusses Ortho Evra and breastfeeding, explaining how the contraceptive can decrease the production of breast milk.
  • Ortho Evra and Pregnancy
    You should not use Ortho Evra during pregnancy, as it may cause miscarriages or birth defects. This eMedTV Web page contains more detailed information about Ortho Evra and pregnancy, and describes what happened when it was used in pregnant animals.
  • Ortho Evra Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, there is only one standard Ortho Evra dosage -- one patch applied every week for the first three weeks of your cycle. This page offers other Ortho Evra dosing information and includes tips on how to use the patch.
  • Ortho Evra Drug Interactions
    Antibiotics, cyclosporine, and many seizure medicines may cause negative Ortho Evra drug interactions. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at other medications that may interact with Ortho Evra, and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Ortho Evra Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that although an overdose on Ortho Evra is unlikely, taking too much of the contraceptive may cause vomiting or vaginal bleeding. This page explains how it may be possible to overdose on the patch and covers treatment options.
  • Ortho Evra Uses
    Ortho Evra is used for preventing pregnancy in adult and adolescent females who are of reproductive age. This eMedTV resource explains some of the benefits of Ortho Evra and also describes possible off-label Ortho Evra uses (such as treating acne).
  • Ortho Evra Warnings and Precautions
    Ortho Evra can increase your blood pressure and your blood sugar levels. This eMedTV resource lists other Ortho Evra warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting the contraceptive, including information on who should not use the patch.
  • Ortho Micronor and Breastfeeding
    Ortho Micronor is usually considered to be safe for breastfeeding women. This article from the eMedTV archives provides more information on Ortho Micronor and breastfeeding, and explains why Ortho Micronor is safer than combined oral contraceptives.
  • Ortho Micronor and Pregnancy
    Women should never intentionally use Ortho Micronor during pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers a more in-depth look at Ortho Micronor and pregnancy, and explores the risks of using birth control pills during pregnancy.
  • Ortho Micronor Dosage
    The standard Ortho Micronor dosage is one tablet daily, taken at the same time each day. This eMedTV article explains how to start Ortho Micronor for the first time, what to do if you miss any pills, and what to do about irregular menstrual periods.
  • Ortho Micronor Drug Information
    This selection from the eMedTV library takes a brief look at Ortho Micronor, a drug used for birth control. Information in this segment includes how this product works, when it is usually prescribed, and why you may need to use additional contraceptives.
  • Ortho Micronor Drug Interactions
    Barbiturates, aprepitant, and modafinil are some of the medicines that may interact with Ortho Micronor. This eMedTV Web page lists specific products that may cause Ortho Micronor drug interactions and describes the effects of these interactions.
  • Ortho Micronor Overdose
    Vaginal bleeding, nausea, and vomiting are potential symptoms of an Ortho Micronor overdose. This eMedTV resource describes other possible effects of an Ortho Micronor overdose and explains whether treatment is necessary.
  • Ortho Micronor Side Effects
    Nausea, dizziness, and headache are some of the most commonly reported Ortho Micronor side effects. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects and also describes potentially serious problems that should be reported to a doctor immediately.
  • Ortho Micronor Uses
    Ortho Micronor is used for preventing pregnancies in women of reproductive age. This eMedTV Web page discusses the advantages and disadvantages of this form of birth control and also lists possible off-label Ortho Micronor uses.
  • Ortho Micronor Warnings and Precautions
    If you get pregnant while taking Ortho Micronor, you may be at higher risk for ectopic pregnancy. This eMedTV article lists other important Ortho Micronor warnings and precautions, and offers information on who should not use progestin-only pills.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women are typically advised to avoid taking Ortho Tri-Cyclen. This section of the eMedTV library provides more information on Ortho Tri-Cyclen and breastfeeding, and explains why progestin-only pills may be a better choice.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen and Pregnancy
    If you are using Ortho Tri-Cyclen and pregnancy occurs, stop taking the pill immediately. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, problems are not likely to occur if you accidentally take Ortho Tri-Cyclen before realizing you are pregnant.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen and Weight Gain
    Women taking Ortho Tri-Cyclen often report weight gain as a side effect of the drug. This part of the eMedTV library contains more information on Ortho Tri-Cyclen and weight gain, and offers some tips for getting your weight back under control.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Birth Control Pills
    This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at Ortho Tri-Cyclen, a birth control pill that has various effects in the body. This segment explains how the drug works and why it is so important to follow dosing guidelines as directed.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Dosage
    Take your Ortho Tri-Cyclen dosage at the same time each day to reduce the risk of pregnancy. This eMedTV resource provides more information on Ortho Tri-Cyclen dosing and also offers a list of general considerations for those taking the pill.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Drug Interactions
    Modafinil, selegiline, and antibiotics may interact with Ortho Tri-Cyclen. Drug interactions, as this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, could increase your risk for developing side effects or increase your chances of accidental pregnancy.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended that breastfeeding women avoid taking Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo. This eMedTV segment offers more information on Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and breastfeeding, and explains why a progestin-only pill may be better for such women.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and Pregnancy
    Taking Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo during pregnancy can potentially cause problems. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and pregnancy, and further explains whether using the pill during pregnancy is dangerous.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and Weight Gain
    If you are using Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and weight gain occurs, ask your doctor for tips to combat this. This eMedTV Web page explains whether women are likely to develop weight gain while taking Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and offers some tips for weight loss.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Dosage
    Following Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo dosage guidelines carefully can help reduce the risk of pregnancy. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at when and how to take Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo and includes general precautions for taking the pills.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Drug Interactions
    Modafinil, cyclosporine, and aprepitant may potentially interact with Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo. As this eMedTV article explains, Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo drug interactions could increase your risk for side effects or increase your chance of pregnancy.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Overdose
    While an overdose of Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is unlikely to be serious, it may cause nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV article describes other potential effects of an Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo overdose and explains the treatment options that are available.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Tablets
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo tablets, which are used to prevent pregnancy. This page explains how this product differs from other oral contraceptives and why this makes following dosing instructions particularly important.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Uses
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is mainly used as a contraceptive, but it can be used "off-label" for other conditions. This eMedTV resource explains how the birth control pill works and lists some of the possible off-label Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo uses.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Warnings and Precautions
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo may increase blood sugar, particularly in women with diabetes. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that may occur with Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the contraceptive are also included.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Overdose
    If you take too much Ortho Tri-Cyclen, overdose symptoms may include vomiting, nausea, and vaginal bleeding. This eMedTV article further discusses the effects of an Ortho Tri-Cyclen overdose and explains how it may be treated.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Side Effects
    Potential Ortho Tri-Cyclen side effects include bloating, headache, and nausea. As this eMedTV Web page explains, while most side effects of the drug are mild, some (such as depression or breast lumps) may require immediate medical attention.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Uses
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen is commonly used for birth control and acne treatment. This article from the eMedTV archives describes how this form of birth control works and also lists possible off-label Ortho Tri-Cyclen uses (such as for treating PMDD).
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Warnings and Precautions
    Tell your doctor if you have diabetes, liver disease, or depression before using Ortho Tri-Cyclen. This eMedTV segment lists other Ortho Tri-Cyclen warnings and precautions, and offers information on who should not use this form of birth control.
  • Ortho-Cept
    Ortho-Cept is a birth control pill that is available by prescription. This article on the eMedTV site describes how Ortho-Cept works, explains when and how to take the oral contraceptive, and lists possible side effects that may occur with the pill.
  • Ortho-Cyclen and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended to avoid taking Ortho-Cyclen while breastfeeding. This part of the eMedTV site provides more information on Ortho-Cyclen and breastfeeding, and describes the problems that may occur if you use the pill while breastfeeding.
  • Ortho-Cyclen and Pregnancy
    You should not knowingly take Ortho-Cyclen during pregnancy, as problems could occur. This page from the eMedTV library offers more information on Ortho-Cyclen and pregnancy, and explains the risk of using birth control pills during pregnancy.
  • Ortho-Cyclen Dosage
    There is only one standard Ortho-Cyclen dosage, regardless of your weight or age. This segment from the eMedTV site provides basic Ortho-Cyclen dosing instructions and explains what you should do if you miss any of the pills.
  • Ortho-Cyclen Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Ortho-Cyclen drug interactions include cyclosporine, antibiotics, and modafinil. This eMedTV segment lists other medicines that may interact with Ortho-Cyclen and describes the potential effects of these drug interactions.
  • Ortho-Cyclen Overdose
    Serious problems are not likely to occur with an Ortho-Cyclen overdose, but nausea or vomiting is possible. This eMedTV resource explores other possible effects of an Ortho-Cyclen overdose and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Ortho-Cyclen Side Effects
    Common Ortho-Cyclen side effects may include nausea, changes in sex drive, and bloating. This eMedTV Web page describes other potential side effects of Ortho-Cyclen, including serious side effects that should be reported to a doctor immediately.
  • Oxicillin
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, oxacillin is an antibiotic prescribed to treat various bacterial infections. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Oxicillin is a common misspelling of oxacillin.
  • Oxitosin
    Oxytocin is a drug licensed to help cause or improve uterine contractions in a variety of situations. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Oxitosin is a common misspelling of oxytocin.
  • Oxocodone
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how oxycodone works to treat pain. This page also describes the factors that may affect your dosage and lists some general precautions with the drug. Oxocodone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxtellar XR
    Oxtellar XR is a drug licensed to treat partial seizures in adults and children age six and older. This eMedTV article provides more details on this prescription medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Oxtellar XR Medication Information
    By preventing abnormal brain activity, Oxtellar XR can help control partial seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV article contains more information on Oxtellar XR, including potential side effects of the medication, safety precautions, and more.
  • Oxybutin
    Oxybutynin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV Web page discusses other approved oxybutynin uses and describes the effects of the medication. Oxybutin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutynin OTC Drugs
    As a nonprescription drug, OTC oxybutynin patches can help treat an overactive bladder in adult women. This eMedTV segment explores this medicated skin patch, including how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Oxycodene
    This eMedTV Web article features a brief overview of oxycodone, an ingredient found in many prescription pain relievers. This page also describes possible side effects and some general precautions. Oxycodene is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycodone Pills
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oxycodone pills, liquid, and capsules are prescription pain medications. This page offers more detail on oxycodone, including information on its potential for abuse and possible side effects of the medication.
  • OxyContin 10 mg Tablets
    There are a number of strengths available for OxyContin tablets; 10 mg is the lowest available strength. This eMedTV resource explains what factors your doctor will consider before making an OxyContin dosing recommendation for your situation.
  • OxyContin 15 mg Tablets
    There are many strengths available for OxyContin tablets; 15 mg is one of the lower strengths. This eMedTV segment offers general information on how dosing works for OxyContin and lists the other strengths that are available for this medication.
  • OxyContin 60 mg Tablets
    People who have never taken opioid medications may not be able to take higher OxyContin strengths. As this eMedTV page explains, 60 mg OxyContin tablets, 80 mg tablets, and 160 mg tablets are probably dangerous for people not accustomed to opioids.
  • OxyContin Dangers
    You should not take OxyContin if you have severe asthma or are having an asthma attack. This segment from the eMedTV site explores other potential danger of OxyContin and includes more information on who should not use this particular pain medication.
  • OxyContin Indications
    OxyContin is a prescription narcotic medication used for treating moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV Web page lists more indications for OxyContin, lists off-label uses for this drug, and offers general warnings for the medicine.
  • OxyContin Medication for Pain
    This eMedTV page talks about OxyContin, a pain medication (specifically, it is used to treat moderate to severe pain). This article describes the effects of OxyContin, explains how often this drug should be taken, and offers general warnings.
  • OxyContin Medication Information
    OxyContin is a prescription narcotic drug licensed to treat moderate to severe pain. This page from the eMedTV library offers more information on this medication, including some of OxyContin's effects, as well as important warnings and precautions.
  • OxyContin Pain Medicine
    This eMedTV segment covers the pain medicine OxyContin, a drug approved for treating moderate to severe pain. This article explains how OxyContin works, describes its effects, and offers information on how often this drug needs to be taken each day.
  • Oxycotton
    People with long-term, moderate to severe pain may benefit from OxyContin. This eMedTV page further covers OxyContin uses and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Oxycotton is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxycotyn
    OxyContin is a long-acting opioid drug used for pain relief. This eMedTV article describes the effects of OxyContin, explains how often the drug should be taken, and lists its possible side effects. Oxycotyn is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxymorphone ER
    Oxymorphone ER is a type of opioid narcotic prescribed to treat long-term, continuous pain. This eMedTV page gives a comprehensive overview of this prescription medication, including its effects, dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Oxytocin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxytocin is used to stimulate contractions either immediately before or right after childbirth. This page describes how this prescription drug works and discusses the circumstances when a woman may receive this drug.
  • Oxytocin Doses
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, oxytocin doses will vary from woman to woman, depending on factors such as the reason she is being given this drug and how she responds to it. This page contains more dosing guidelines and links to more details.
  • Oxytocin Injections
    If your doctor recommends oxytocin, it can be injected slowly into a vein or directly into a muscle. This eMedTV resource describes the factors that will determine how these oxytocin injections are administered. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Oxytocin Side Effects
    If you are given oxytocin and experience vision problems or confusion, tell your doctor right away. This eMedTV resource examines other oxytocin side effects that may occur, including potentially serious problems that need immediate medical treatment.
  • Oxytocin Uterine Effects
    By binding to receptors in the uterus, oxytocin causes the uterine muscle to contract. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at the effects of oxytocin on uterine contractions and how this drug works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ozurdex Drug Eye Implant
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers some basic drug information on Ozurdex, an implant used to treat certain eye conditions. This article gives a brief overview of the medication and provides a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Pacerone 200 Mg
    As explained in this eMedTV page, a doctor may prescribe Pacerone 200-mg tablets to treat serious arrhythmias. This article offers some instructions for what to expect during treatment, including how the drug is taken and how your amount is determined.
  • Pacerone and Bradycardia
    You should not take Pacerone if you have bradycardia (a very slow heart rate). This eMedTV segment explains why some people may not be able to use this medicine. It also discusses why you need to tell your doctor about your complete medical history.
  • Pacerone Medication Information
    People who have a serious ventricular arrhythmia may receive Pacerone. This eMedTV Web selection contains more information on Pacerone, including how to take this medication, safety concerns, and side effects. It also provides a link to more details.
  • Pagasys
    Pegasys is a drug used to treat hepatitis C infections in adults and children, and hepatitis B in adults. This eMedTV page describes how this prescription drug works and explains what your doctor needs to know. Pagasys is a common misspelling of Pegasys.
  • Palgic Medication Information
    Palgic is a prescription antihistamine used for treating hay fever and various other types of allergies. This eMedTV article provides more medication information on Palgic and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug.
  • Palgic Oral
    There are two different forms of Palgic, oral solution and tablets. This page on the eMedTV Web site briefly outlines approved Palgic uses, explains when and how to take this medicine, and lists some of the potential side effects of the drug.
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