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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Oral Sex and Hepatitis C - Paliperidone (Invega)

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Oral Sex and Hepatitis C to Paliperidone (Invega). The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Oral Sofosbuvir
    This eMedTV page examines sofosbuvir, an oral medication prescribed to treat chronic hepatitis C in adults. This page takes a brief look at general dosing guidelines and possible side effects. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Orap
    Orap is a prescription drug used to treat Tourette syndrome when other treatment is unsuccessful. This eMedTV Web selection gives an overview of this medication, including how it works, dosing instructions, potential side effects, and more.
  • Orap 1 Mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe 1 mg of Orap to treat motor and verbal tics caused by Tourette syndrome. This article takes a brief look at some dosing guidelines for this drug and offers a link to more details on this medicine.
  • Orap and Insomnia
    As this eMedTV resource explains, if you are taking Orap and develop insomnia, let your healthcare provider know. This page describes whether this is a common side effect of the medication. It also provides a link to other possible reactions to this drug.
  • Order Lortab Online
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Lortab can be ordered online from an Internet pharmacy, as long as you have a legitimate prescription. This article talks about buying Lortab online and discusses the dangers of obtaining it without a prescription.
  • Order OxyContin Online
    There are many licensed pharmacies that allow OxyContin to be ordered online. As this eMedTV page explains, you can buy this drug online as long as you have a legitimate prescription. Any pharmacy that does not require a prescription is breaking the law.
  • Ordering Xenical Without a Prescription
    As this eMedTV page explains, although many people may be interested in ordering Xenical without a prescription, the drug is available by prescription only. However, an over-the-counter version of Xenical is now available (sold by the name Alli).
  • Orlastat
    Orlistat (Xenical, Alli) can help people lose weight as well as keep the weight off. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of the drug, which is available with and without a prescription. Orlastat is a common misspelling of orlistat.
  • Orlistat (Alli, Xenical) Information
    This eMedTV Web resource offers important information on orlistat (Alli, Xenical), a weight loss medication available with or without a prescription. This page also covers how this medicine works, general precautions, and potential side effects.
  • Orlistat 120 mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, using orlistat 120 mg capsules three times daily may help people lose weight. This page offers some tips on using this medication and further describes some general dosing guidelines to be aware of.
  • Orlistat 60 mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, orlistat 60 mg capsules used three times a day can help with weight loss. This article further discusses dosing guidelines and describes some tips for when and how to use this weight loss medicine.
  • Orlistat Capsules
    As this eMedTV page discusses, orlistat is a prescription and non-prescription medicine used to help with weight loss. This page offers more detail on these capsules, including how orlistat works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Orlistat Over the Counter
    Both over-the-counter and prescription orlistat are available for weight loss. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of this medication, including its uses, how the drug works, and possible side effects, with a link to more information.
  • Orlistat Without a Prescription
    This eMedTV page discusses how you can buy orlistat without a prescription. The nonprescription version is sold under the name Alli and is used for helping people lose weight. This page also covers how the drug works and possible side effects.
  • Orsythia
    Orsythia is an oral form of birth control that contains two different types of hormones. This selection from the eMedTV library takes a detailed look at this oral contraceptive, including how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Ortho Evra Side Effects
    Some of the common side effects of Ortho Evra include nausea, headaches, and skin reactions. This eMedTV page describes other common side effects of the drug, as well as potentially serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Ortho Tri Cyclin Low
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is a combined oral contraceptive that can be obtained with a prescription. This eMedTV article describes the pill in more detail and explains how it works. Ortho Tri Cyclin Low is a common misspelling of Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo.
  • Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo Side Effects
    Common side effects of Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo may include nausea, bloating, and headache. This eMedTV page describes other side effects that have been reported with birth control pills and also lists potentially serious reactions to Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo.
  • Ortho Tricyclen Low
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is an oral contraceptive that contains two different hormones. This eMedTV Web page explains how Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo works and lists possible side effects. Ortho Tricyclen Low is a common misspelling of Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo.
  • Ortho-Novum Side Effects
    Common side effects of Ortho-Novum may include nausea, bloating, and headaches. This eMedTV segment outlines other common side effects and also describes which ones should be reported to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Orthotricyclin Lo
    Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo is a birth control pill that contains a lower dose of hormones than other pills. This eMedTV page describes how the pill works and links to more information. Orthotricyclin Lo is a common misspelling of Ortho Tri-Cyclen Lo.
  • Osella
    Ocella is a generic birth control pill that is available by prescription only. This eMedTV segment explains how the medication works and explains what side effects may occur with this form of contraception. Osella is a common misspelling of Ocella.
  • Osena
    Oseni is a combination medicine prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This part of the eMedTV Web library describes how this drug lowers blood sugar levels and explains how often it should be taken. Osena is a common misspelling of Oseni.
  • Oseni Medication Information
    As a type of diabetes drug, Oseni can help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV selection includes more information on how Oseni works and explains what side effects may occur with the use of this medication.
  • Osenni
    Oseni is a medication used for lowering blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works and lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting it. Osenni is a common misspelling of Oseni.
  • Osfena
    Osphena is a prescription drug licensed to treat painful sexual intercourse in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV article explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone and covers how to take it. Osfena is a common misspelling of Osphena.
  • Ospemifene
    Ospemifene can help treat painful sexual intercourse in women who have gone through menopause. This eMedTV Web selection presents an overview of this drug, including when it is prescribed, how it works, side effects, and links to more details.
  • Osphena
    Osphena is prescribed to treat painful sexual intercourse in women who have gone through menopause. This eMedTV Web page provides more details on this medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Ostearthritis
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers a brief overview of osteoarthritis, the most common type of arthritis. This page also describes possible treatment options that are available. Ostearthritis is a common misspelling of osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthiritis
    Osteoarthritis is a joint disease that causes pain and limited movement. This eMedTV Web article provides a brief overview of this disease and offers a link to more detailed information. Osteoarthiritis is a common misspelling of osteoarthritis.
  • Osteoarthritis Research
    Gene therapy, diagnostic tools, and tissue engineering are some current areas of osteoarthritis research. As this eMedTV article explains, this research may help discover new treatment methods or even understand how the disease can be prevented.
  • Osteogenesis Imperfecta Symptoms
    Symptoms of osteogenesis imperfecta include short stature, weak muscles, and bones that fracture easily. This eMedTV Web page lists some of the potential osteogenesis imperfecta symptoms for each type of the disorder.
  • Osteoparosis
    This eMedTV page explains that osteoporosis is a bone disease that causes the bones to become fragile. This page also covers common causes of this disease and which bones are more commonly affected. Osteoparosis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteopena
    Osteopenia is a type of bone disease that occurs when bone is lost faster than the body can create it. This eMedTV page describes how osteopenia differs from osteoporosis and explains how it is diagnosed. Osteopena is a common misspelling of osteopenia.
  • Osteopeni
    Osteopenia is a milder form of osteoporosis. This eMedTV Web article explains how osteopenia is diagnosed and discusses how people who have osteopenia are at an increased risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteopeni is a common misspelling of osteopenia.
  • Osteoperosis
    Osteoporosis is a type of bone disease that results in millions of bone fractures each year. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at osteoporosis and provides a link to more detailed information. Osteoperosis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoperosis Medications
    Estrogen therapy, alendronate, and risedronate are some of the medications used to treat osteoporosis. This eMedTV page describes these and other drugs used for osteoporosis. Osteoperosis medications is a common misspelling of osteoporosis medications.
  • Osteoperosis Treatment
    Proper nutrition, exercise, and medications may help treat osteoporosis. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of osteoporosis treatment, and offers a link to more information. Osteoperosis treatment is a common misspelling of osteoporosis treatment.
  • Osteopetrosis
    Osteoporosis is a type of disease that causes bones to become thin and more susceptible to fracture. This eMedTV article takes a further look at osteoporosis and describes possible treatment options. Osteopetrosis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteopina
    Osteopenia is similar to osteoporosis, but is a milder form of the bone disease. This eMedTV Web resource discusses what osteopenia is and explains how a healthcare provider can diagnose the condition. Osteopina is a common misspelling of osteopenia.
  • Osteoporis
    As this eMedTV resource explains, osteoporosis occurs in men and women, and results in brittle bones that are more susceptible to fracture. This page also offers a link to more detailed information. Osteoporis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporisis
    Osteoporosis is a disease that mainly affects the spine, wrists, and hips. This eMedTV page further describes how this disease can affect the bones and covers possible causes of the disease. Osteoporisis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporoses
    This page from the eMedTV Web site explains how osteoporosis causes brittle bones that are more susceptible to fractures. This page also explains how a doctor diagnoses this bone disease. Osteoporoses is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporosis Statistics
    Did you know that osteoporosis can strike at any age? This portion of the eMedTV library provides several statistics on osteoporosis. For example, it is a major health threat for 44 million Americans, and it costs the country $14 billion annually.
  • Osteoporotic
    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that increases the risk of fractures. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at signs of this disease and treatment options. A link to more information is also provided. Osteoporotic is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteoporsis
    When a person has osteoporosis, he or she is at an increased risk of bone fracture. This eMedTV page offers an overview of osteoporosis, including information on how this disease can cause disabilities. Osteoporsis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Osteporosis
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of osteoporosis, a bone disease that increases the risk of fractures. This page also covers possible causes of osteoporosis and treatment options that are available. Osteporosis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Ostopenia
    As this eMedTV segment explains, osteopenia is a milder form of osteoporosis, and it occurs when bone is lost at a faster rate than it is replaced. This page also discusses how osteopenia is diagnosed. Ostopenia is a common misspelling of osteopenia.
  • Ostoporose
    This eMedTV Web resource discusses what occurs in people who have osteoporosis, a bone disease that increases the risk of fractures. This page also describes possible causes of osteoporosis. Ostoporose is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • Ostoporosis
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how osteoporosis can cause brittle bones that are more susceptible to fracture. This page also discusses how a healthcare provider diagnoses this disease. Ostoporosis is a common misspelling of osteoporosis.
  • OTC Oxybutynin Patch Information
    OTC oxybutynin patch is a nonprescription medicine used to treat an overactive bladder in adult women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on OTC oxybutynin patch, including dosing tips and general safety concerns.
  • Other Meds Like Metanx
    Folast, Foltx, and Folbic tablets are similar products to Metanx. This eMedTV article explores other meds like Metanx, and explains why there are no generic versions of this vitamin available. A link to more details is also included.
  • Other Names for Amiodarone
    Cordarone, Pacerone, and Nexterone are brand names for amiodarone. Other details are included in this eMedTV resource, including how this antiarrhythmia medication works to treat certain abnormal heartbeats. It also links to more information.
  • Other Uses for Nicorette Gum
    As this eMedTV article explains, the primary use of Nicorette Gum is to help adults stop smoking cigarettes -- but are there other uses? This Web page talks about using this product "off-label" and includes a link to more information on the topic.
  • Ovarain Cancer
    Ovarian cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women. This eMedTV Web page explains who is at a lower risk for developing this condition and lists available treatment options. Ovarain cancer is a common misspelling of ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarian Cancer Causes
    This eMedTV segment discusses risk factors that, while not proven causes of ovarian cancer, may increase a woman's chances of developing the condition. These risk factors include age and use of hormone replacement therapy, among other things.
  • Ovarian Germ Cell Cancer
    This eMedTV resource offers a detailed discussion of ovarian germ cell cancer, a disease in which malignant cells form in the germ cells of the ovary. It explores possible symptoms, treatment options, and factors that affect a woman's prognosis.
  • Ovarienne Cancer
    Ovarian cancer is a disease that usually has no early symptoms. This eMedTV segment explains who is affected by this cancer, how staging is determined, and what treatments are available. Ovarienne cancer is a common misspelling of ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarion Cancer
    Ovarian cancer is a disease in which malignant cells develop in the tissues of the ovaries. This eMedTV page lists risk factors for this cancer and explains how a doctor determines treatment. Ovarion cancer is a common misspelling of ovarian cancer.
  • Ovcon Birth Control Pills
    This segment on the eMedTV site presents a basic overview of the Ovcon birth control pill. It discusses how this medication compares to another class of oral contraceptives, discusses general dosing guidelines, and covers common side effects.
  • Over the Counter Ativan
    There is no over-the-counter Ativan medication available; it is only available with a prescription. This eMedTV Web segment offers an overview of Ativan, including information on its uses, how the drug works, and possible side effects.
  • Over-the-Counter Allegra
    Allegra used to be available by prescription only, but it is now available over-the-counter (OTC). This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at Allegra and its approved uses, effects, warnings, and general dosing information.
  • Over-the-Counter Bonine
    Bonine is an antihistamine commonly used for treating and preventing motion sickness. This eMedTV resource describes how the over-the-counter medicine works and provides general information on when and how to take Bonine.
  • Over-the-Counter Claritin
    Compared to other antihistamines available over-the-counter, Claritin is less likely to cause drowsiness. This eMedTV segment explains what Claritin is used for and describes the various forms and strengths that are available for this medication.
  • Over-the-Counter Diflucan
    At this time, there is no over-the-counter Diflucan. As this page on the eMedTV site explains, Diflucan is an antifungal drug that is available by prescription only. It is approved to treat (and sometimes prevent) various types of fungal infections.
  • Over-the-Counter Meclizine
    As this eMedTV resource explains, several conditions can be treated with meclizine. Over-the-counter versions of the drug are approved to treat motion sickness, while the prescription versions are licensed to treat motion sickness and vertigo.
  • Over-the-Counter Valium
    Valium is not available over the counter. Valium, as this eMedTV resource explains, is a controlled substance that has the potential to be abused. It can cause serious problems if you take it for a longer period of time than your doctor recommends.
  • Over-the-Counter Zyrtec
    As this eMedTV segment explains, over-the-counter Zyrtec is significantly less expensive than its prescription counterpart. This eMedTV article explores some of the other benefits of OTC Zyrtec and explains whether insurance companies will cover it.
  • Overactive Bladder Treatment
    As explained in this article from the eMedTV Web site, overactive bladder treatment may involve behavioral therapy, medications, or surgery, among other things. This article discusses the different treatment options in detail.
  • Overdose of Benedryl
    A Benadryl overdose may lead to seizures, coma, or even loss of life. This eMedTV article explores the dangers of an overdose and lists other possible overdose symptoms. Overdose of Benedryl is a common variation and misspelling of Benadryl overdose.
  • Overusing MiraLAX
    An electrolyte imbalance is one possible complication that can occur from overusing MiraLAX. This eMedTV page describes other problems that may occur if you use this laxative for an extended time. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Ovulation Medications
    Many different drugs can be used to stimulate ovulation in women who have this particular fertility problem. This eMedTV segment takes a detailed look at several different classes of ovulation medications, exploring the pros and cons of each.
  • Oxacillin Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxacillin is given intravenously (by IV) or as an intramuscular injection every four to six hours. More dosing instructions for oxacillin are given in this article, including details on how the amount is calculated.
  • Oxacillin Drug Information
    Oxacillin is prescribed for the treatment of infections caused by certain bacteria. This eMedTV Web page features more information on oxacillin, including how it is administered, potential side effects, and more.
  • Oxacillin Side Effects
    Oxacillin can cause nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting in some people who use this antibiotic. This eMedTV page examines other potential oxacillin side effects, including those that may lead to dangerous complications.
  • Oxaliplatin 100 Mg
    After taking several factors into consideration, your doctor may prescribe an oxaliplatin dosage of 100 mg. This eMedTV segment describes the factors that may affect your dose, explains how the drug works, and covers some of the potential side effects.
  • Oxaliplatin and Asthma
    If you have asthma, oxaliplatin may not be the most appropriate chemotherapy drug for you. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at how some people using this medication developed lung disease. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Oxaliplatin and Cancer
    A doctor may prescribe oxaliplatin to treat cancer of the colon or rectum. This page of the eMedTV Web library offers a brief look at this chemotherapy drug and how it works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Oxaliplatin and Cold Sensitivity
    People using oxaliplatin may develop nerve problems like sensitivity to cold temperatures or objects. This eMedTV Web page explains how to help minimize some of this cold sensitivity caused by oxaliplatin, and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin and Ice Chips
    As this eMedTV segment explains, you may need to avoid cold beverages and ice chips if you are receiving oxaliplatin and develop nerve problems like sensitivity to cold temperatures. This page explores this topic and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin in Older Patients
    Although older patients can use oxaliplatin, they may have an increased risk for side effects. This eMedTV resource outlines some of those possible reactions, such as diarrhea and dehydration. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Oxaliplatin Injection
    As explained in this eMedTV article, oxaliplatin comes as an injection that is administered intravenously (by IV) every two weeks. This page discusses what to expect while receiving this drug, and offers a link to more details.
  • Oxaliplatin Neuropathy
    A majority of the people who receive oxaliplatin will develop some type of neuropathy (nerve problem). This eMedTV segment examines some of the forms of neuropathy that can occur, including a list of some of the possible signs of these nerve problems.
  • Oxaliplatin Side Effects
    People receiving oxaliplatin are likely to experience some type of side effect, such as nausea or vomiting. This eMedTV Web page examines other possible side effects of this drug, including some of the potentially serious problems that require treatment.
  • Oxaliplatine
    As this eMedTV page explains, adults with colon or rectal cancer may benefit from treatment with oxaliplatin. This page describes how the drug is given and lists some potential side effects. Oxaliplatine is a common misspelling of oxaliplatin.
  • Oxalplatin
    A doctor may prescribe oxaliplatin to treat certain types of colon or rectal cancer in adults. This eMedTV resource explores this chemotherapy drug, including how it works and potential side effects. Oxalplatin is a common misspelling of oxaliplatin.
  • Oxazepam Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on oxazepam? This eMedTV resource presents a brief overview of this drug. It explains how it works, the conditions it can treat, and general dosing guidelines. This page also covers what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Oxcodone
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe oxycodone medications to treat pain. This page also explains the drug's significant potential for abuse and offers a link to more detailed information. Oxcodone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxcontin
    OxyContin is a morphine-like painkiller specifically used to treat moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV segment explores the benefits of OxyContin and also offers general warnings for this drug. Oxcontin is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxicodon
    This eMedTV Web article explains that oxycodone is an opioid narcotic found in many prescription pain medications. This article also describes the abuse potential and possible side effects of oxycodone. Oxicodon is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxicodone Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV page explains, stopping oxycodone too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as diarrhea and vomiting. This page describes other oxycodone withdrawal symptoms. Oxicodone withdrawal is a common misspelling of oxycodone withdrawal.
  • Oxiconten
    OxyContin is a prescription drug licensed to treat moderate to severe pain in adults. This eMedTV article describes OxyContin in more detail and offers information on the abuse potential of this drug. Oxiconten is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxicotin
    Doctors often prescribe OxyContin (a narcotic) for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV article explains how OxyContin works, describes its effects, and offers general dosing information. Oxycotin is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxicoton
    OxyContin is an opioid pain reliever specifically used for treating moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV segment explains how OxyContin works and explores the benefits of this particular medication. Oxicoton is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxicottin
    OxyContin is a prescription painkiller used to treat long-term, moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV page explains how OxyContin works, describes its various effects, and lists some possible side effects. Oxicottin is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxitocin
    Oxytocin is prescribed to cause or improve uterine contractions in pregnant women. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at this prescription drug, including specific uses and potential side effects. Oxitocin is a common misspelling of oxytocin.
  • Oxybutanin
    Oxybutynin is a prescription drug licensed to treat the symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV Web page further describes oxybutynin and discusses its effects and possible side effects. Oxybutanin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutinin
    Oxybutynin is a medication that can be prescribed to treat the symptoms of neurogenic bladder. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of oxybutynin and lists possible side effects that may occur. Oxybutinin is a common misspelling of oxybutynin.
  • Oxybutynin Chloride ER Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on oxybutynin chloride ER? This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this drug, including how it works to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder, common side effects, and important safety concerns.
  • Oxybutynin Side Effects
    Common side effects of oxybutynin may include abdominal pain, nausea, and insomnia. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other common side effects of the drug, as well as serious side effects that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Oxycodeine
    As this eMedTV page explains, oxycodone is an ingredient found in many prescription pain relievers. This page also describes the various available forms of oxycodone and covers its potential for abuse. Oxycodeine is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycoden
    Oxycodone, a type of opioid narcotic, is found in many prescription pain relievers. This page of the eMedTV Web library provides a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Oxycoden is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • Oxycoden
    OxyContin is an opioid (morphine-like) medication commonly used as a painkiller. This eMedTV resource offers more information on OxyContin, including general dosing guidelines and important warnings. Oxycoden is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxycodine Overdose
    If you think you have taken too much oxycodone, seek immediate medical care. This eMedTV page further discusses the potential dangers of an oxycodone overdose, including possible symptoms. Oxycodine overdose is a common misspelling of oxycodone overdose.
  • Oxycodone 10 mg
    This eMedTV article explains that 10 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This page further discusses oxycodone, including whether this drug is available as a generic. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • Oxycodone 20 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, 20 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article further discusses the 20 mg tablets, and also offers a link to more information on other forms of oxycodone medications.
  • Oxycodone 30 mg
    As this eMedTV page explains, 30 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article further discusses oxycodone tablets, and also offers a link to more information on other forms of oxycodone medications.
  • Oxycodone 40 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, 40 mg oxycodone tablets are available in short-acting and long-acting forms. This article takes a closer look at oxycodone, including whether it comes as a generic. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • Oxycodone Abuse
    As this eMedTV page explains, oxycodone has a significant potential for both physical and psychological dependence and abuse. This article further discusses the abuse of oxycodone, including possible signs that a person may be abusing this pain medicine.
  • Oxycodone Addiction
    People can become addicted to oxycodone. This eMedTV resource lists common signs of addiction and explains where you can get help for this problem. This page also describes the difference between addiction and physical dependence on the drug.
  • Oxycodone and Pregnancy
    Research on pregnancy and oxycodone indicates that this medication is unlikely to cause birth defects. As this eMedTV page explains, however, oxycodone is a narcotic and may cause withdrawal symptoms (such as a rapid heart rate) in an infant after birth.
  • Oxycodone Dosage
    In general, most people will start with a short-acting oxycodone product at a low dosage. This eMedTV page offers more detailed information on dosage recommendations for oxycodone, including tips on effectively and safely using this medication.
  • Oxycodone ER
    Oxycodone ER is a narcotic medication commonly prescribed to treat moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV resource describes how the drug works, offers dosing information, and explains what side effects may occur with treatment.
  • Oxycodone HCL Medication Information
    This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a look at important information on oxycodone HCl, a medication used for pain relief. This page also explains why oxycodone HCl may not be suitable for some people and describes possible side effects.
  • Oxycodone Hydrochloride
    Oxycodone hydrochloride is an ingredient found in many prescription pain medications. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of this medication, including information on its potential for abuse, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Oxycodone Maximum Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the maximum oxycodone dosage will vary, depending on several factors, such as your tolerance to opioid drugs and the severity of your pain. This page further explains why there is no standard maximum dosage for this drug.
  • Oxycodone Medicine for Pain
    As a pain medicine, oxycodone works by binding to opioid receptors throughout the body. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at oxycodone, including information on how it works and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Oxycodone Oral
    As this page from the eMedTV Web library discusses, oral oxycodone medications may be prescribed to treat pain. This page also describes how these pain medications work, outlines possible side effects, and offers some general safety precautions.
  • Oxycodone Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on oxycodone. This eMedTV page provides a list of possible overdose symptoms (such as difficulty breathing, extreme drowsiness, and cardiac arrest) and describes possible treatment options.
  • Oxycodone Withdrawal Symptoms
    Vomiting, diarrhea, and sweating are possible withdrawal symptoms of oxycodone. This eMedTV Web segment further explores potential withdrawal symptoms, including information on when they may occur and how to minimize them.
  • Oxycondone
    Oxycodone is an ingredient found in many prescription medications used to treat pain. This eMedTV article describes oxycodone in more detail and offers general precautions for taking the drug. Oxycondone is a common misspelling of oxycodone.
  • OxyContin 40 mg
    As this page on the eMedTV Web site explains, OxyContin comes in many strengths; the 40 mg OxyContin tablets are only one of the eight strengths available for this drug. This article offers information on how dosing works for OxyContin.
  • OxyContin Dosage
    There is no standard dosage of OxyContin that will work for everyone. As this eMedTV page explains, since some people are more sensitive to narcotics than others, many doctors will start patients with a low dose and make dosing adjustments as needed.
  • OxyContin Drug Information
    OxyContin is a narcotic often prescribed for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV Web page provides more drug information on OxyContin, including a list of potential side effects of the medication and important warnings and precautions.
  • OxyContin Overdose
    An overdose of OxyContin (oxycodone ER) requires immediate medical attention, as it can be fatal. This eMedTV Web page includes a list of possible overdose symptoms and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • OxyContin Withdrawal Symptoms
    Abdominal cramps, nausea, and chills are symptoms that may occur during withdrawal from OxyContin. This eMedTV segment provides a more complete list of possible symptoms of OxyContin withdrawal and explains why withdrawal occurs with this drug.
  • OxyContine
    OxyContin is a potent narcotic drug commonly used as a painkiller. This eMedTV page describes OxyContin in more detail and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using the drug. OxyContine is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxyconton
    OxyContin is a narcotic medication that provides around-the-clock pain control. This eMedTV article discusses OxyContin uses in more detail and explains what side effects may occur with this drug. Oxyconton is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxycoten
    OxyContin is a medication approved to treat long-term, moderate to severe pain. This eMedTV page describes how OxyContin works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using the drug. Oxycoten is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxycotine
    The prescription drug OxyContin is licensed to relieve moderate to severe pain. This page on the eMedTV site explains how often OxyContin is typically taken and lists some of its potential side effects. Oxycotine is a common misspelling of OxyContin.
  • Oxytrol No Prescription
    Available without a prescription, Oxytrol For Women is used to treat an overactive bladder in women. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at dosing tips, potential side effects, and general safety concerns. It also links to more details.
  • Oxytrol Patch for Overactive Bladder
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the Oxytrol patch is the only overactive bladder medication sold in the form of a patch. This article gives an introduction to using this product and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • P-Glycoprotein and Digoxin
    This eMedTV page explains that if you take digoxin with a medicine that affects p-glycoprotein, it can change the way your body handles digoxin. This page further describes this drug interaction and offers a link to more details.
  • Pacerone Side Effects
    Because side effects are common with Pacerone, it is important to know which problems require medical care. This eMedTV Web page describes which problems you should report to your doctor right away. It also lists common and rare reactions that may occur.
  • Paclitaxel Side Effects
    Common paclitaxel side effects may include neutropenia, anemia, and hair loss. As this segment of the eMedTV archives explains, some side effects are more serious and may require prompt medical attention, such as bloody stool or severe mouth sores.
  • Pain Control Management
    Many techniques can help you manage pain -- and not all of them involve medication. This eMedTV resource takes a look at the things that can help with pain control, such as exercise and stress management, as well as prescription and nonprescription drugs.
  • Pain With Pancreatic Cancer
    Medication, radiation therapy, and nerve blocks are some methods for relieving pancreatic cancer pain. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at the treatment options for pain associated with this disease.
  • Palavik
    Plavix is an antiplatelet drug given to people after a heart attack, stroke, or severe chest pain. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Plavix and lists some of its potential side effects. Palavik is a common misspelling of Plavix.
  • Palgic
    Palgic is a prescription drug used for treating a variety of allergies, including eye and skin allergies. This eMedTV resource describes how the medicine works, explains what forms and strengths it comes in, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Palgic 4 mg Tablets
    There are two different forms of Palgic, tablets (4 mg) and oral solution (4 mg per 5 mL). This part of the eMedTV library offers information on what this medication is used for and provides Palgic dosing guidelines for both adults and children.
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