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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Norvasc Generic - Oral Polio Vaccine

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Norvasc Generic to Oral Polio Vaccine. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Numbness, Tingling, and Pain
    Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can be subtle at first and come on slowly. One of the most common signs is numbness, tingling, or pain -- particularly in the hands, feet, toes, legs, fingers, and arms. The feet and legs are likely to be affected before the hands and arms, which is why good foot care is so important for someone with diabetes.
  • Nursing and Levaquin
    It is generally not advised for women who are breastfeeding to take Levaquin. This page from the eMedTV Web site further discusses the risks of nursing and taking Levaquin at the same time, including information on what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Nutrition, Exercise, and Other Lifestyle Changes During Ovarian Cancer Treatment
    What do nutrition and exercise have to do with ovarian cancer treatment? More than you might think. This eMedTV article talks about lifestyle changes that can help with treatment, with info on how they can reduce side effects, improve your mood, and more.
  • NuvaRing and Antibiotics
    There is a potential drug interaction between antibiotics and NuvaRing. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, rifamycin antibiotics can decrease the effectiveness of NuvaRing, increasing your risk of unintended pregnancy.
  • NuvaRing Dangers
    NuvaRing may increase the risk of blood clots, strokes, or heart attacks. This page on the eMedTV site further explores the potential dangers of NuvaRing and offers general warnings on who should not use this particular method of birth control.
  • NuvaRing Dosage
    There is only one standard way to dose NuvaRing, regardless of your age, weight, or medical conditions. This eMedTV segment offers more NuvaRing dosage information and explains when and how to safely and effectively use the vaginal ring.
  • NuvaRing Overdose
    Since NuvaRing is not an oral contraceptive, an overdose seems unlikely to occur. This part of the eMedTV library further explains why a NuvaRing overdose is not likely to occur and describes treatment options that are available for an overdose.
  • NuvaRing Safety Information
    You should not use NuvaRing if you have very high blood pressure. This eMedTV article provides other safety information on NuvaRing, including more details on who should not use this contraceptive and warnings on what complications may occur.
  • NuvaRing Uses
    NuvaRing is primarily used for preventing pregnancy. As this eMedTV resource explains, doctors may also sometimes recommend off-label NuvaRing uses, such as for treating painful menstrual periods, heavy menstrual bleeding, and irregular periods.
  • NuvaRing Warnings and Precautions
    Smoking cigarettes greatly increases the risk of serious NuvaRing side effects (such as blood clots). This eMedTV article lists other possible problems to look out for and offers NuvaRing warnings and precautions on who should not use the product.
  • Nuvigil and Breastfeeding
    It is currently not known whether it is safe for women to breastfeed while taking Nuvigil. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Nuvigil and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • Nuvigil and Pregnancy
    Based on information from studies on Nuvigil and pregnancy, the drug may not be safe for pregnant women. At this eMedTV article explains, Nuvigil increased the risk of miscarriages and birth defects when it was given to pregnant rats and rabbits.
  • Nuvigil Dosage
    The recommended Nuvigil dosage for people with shift work sleep disorder is 150 mg. This part of the eMedTV library also offers dosing recommendations for people with sleep apnea and narcolepsy, and explains when and how to take the medicine.
  • Nuvigil Drug Information
    If you have sleep apnea or narcolepsy, your healthcare provider may recommend Nuvigil. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of Nuvigil, with information on what else the drug can be used for and what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Nuvigil Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Nuvigil drug interactions include propranolol, diazepam, and warfarin. This eMedTV segment lists some of the other drugs that may interact with Nuvigil and explains what may happen when these medicines are taken together.
  • Nuvigil Overdose
    Insomnia, high blood pressure, and hallucinations are possible effects of a Nuvigil overdose. This eMedTV resource lists other symptoms that may occur if you take too much Nuvigil, and various treatment options are also described.
  • Nuvigil Side Effects
    Potentially serious Nuvigil side effects include chest pain, rash, and anxiety. As this eMedTV page explains, however, side effects are usually mild and don't require treatment. This page also lists the more common side effects of the drug.
  • Nuvigil Uses
    Nuvigil is used for helping people with shift work sleep disorder, sleep apnea, or narcolepsy stay awake. This eMedTV Web page further explains how the drug can help treat excessive sleepiness and lists common off-label Nuvigil uses.
  • Nuvigil Warnings and Precautions
    People are typically advised to avoid drinking alcohol while taking Nuvigil. This eMedTV Web page further explains what you should know before starting Nuvigil. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug are also included.
  • Nystatin and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV segment explains, it is usually considered safe to breastfeed while taking nystatin. This article explores whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk and explains how this medication can be used in young infants.
  • Nystatin and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is unknown if nystatin is completely safe for women who are expecting. This page from the eMedTV site explores the potential risks of using this medication while pregnant and explains whether a fetus is likely to be exposed to nystatin.
  • Nystatin Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, significant drug interactions with nystatin are unlikely. Not much of nystatin is absorbed into the bloodstream; since it does not reach the liver, it is unlikely to interact with other medications.
  • Nystatin Overdose
    Unlike with most medications, an overdose with nystatin is unlikely to cause serious problems. This eMedTV article explains why an overdose with this medication is unlikely to cause serious problems and explores possible treatment options.
  • Nystatin Uses
    Nystatin is licensed to treat yeast infections, thrush, diaper rash, and various other fungal infections. This eMedTV segment further discusses the approved uses for nystatin, explains how the drug works, and lists possible off-label uses.
  • Nystatin Warnings and Precautions
    If you have kidney disease, check with your doctor before using nystatin. This eMedTV resource provides more warnings and precautions with nystatin, including information on who should not use this drug and what side effects or problems may occur.
  • Oats
    Oats are high in soluble fiber and are relatively low on the glycemic index, especially if you choose the "old-fashioned" unsweetened varieties instead of the quick ones. Studies have shown that people who eat more soluble fiber tend to have less "visceral" belly fat -- that deep, hard-to-lose belly fat that is especially dangerous to your health. Also, studies have shown that low-glycemic-index foods, which encourage stable blood sugar, also help to reduce belly fat.
  • Objawy stwardnienia rozsianego
    We wczesnych etapach rozwoju stwardnienia rozsianego u chorych pojawiaj? si? cz?sto takie objawy jak: * os?abienie mi??ni; * mrowienie i dr?twienie; * zaburzenia równowagi; * zamglone lub podwójne widzenie * i/lub ból oczu.
  • Obstrucción Intestinal
    Obstrucción Intestinal
  • Obtaining ED Medications Discreetly
    When buying an ED medication from an online pharmacy, there are ways to make sure the pharmacy is not fake. This eMedTV page offers important details on how to ensure the online pharmacy you have chosen is legitimate and licensed in the United States.
  • Occupy Your Hands
    Even if you meet your oral needs, your hands might be missing their old, familiar companions. Keep your hands occupied with a paper clip, coin, stress ball, pencil, or anything else that seems to take the edge off.
  • Ocella Alternatives
    If Ocella is causing intolerable side effects, you may want to consider an alternative. This part of the eMedTV Web site explores these other methods of contraception, with information on the other types of birth control pills that are available.
  • Ocella Contraceptive
    As a prescription oral contraceptive, Ocella is highly effective at preventing pregnancy. This eMedTV selection takes a closer look at Ocella, with helpful dosing guidelines and tips on how to reduce your risk of problems while taking it.
  • Ocella Dangers
    Some of the dangerous side effects that can occur with Ocella include blood clots and liver damage. This eMedTV Web selection talks about other serious problems associated with this form of birth control and provides a link to more information.
  • Ocella Dosage
    The recommended dose of Ocella is one tablet daily, taken at the same time each day. This eMedTV article covers dosing guidelines in more detail, including information on how to start Ocella for the first time and what to do if you miss a dose.
  • Ocella Medication Information
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Ocella is the generic version of Yasmin, a prescription birth control pill. This article offers more information on the medication, including some of Ocella's side effects and a few safety precautions.
  • Ocella Risks
    Every medication presents risks, and Ocella is no exception. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of these dangers, including potential side effects and why some women should avoid this birth control pill altogether.
  • Ocella Safety Information
    If you have certain liver, kidney, or adrenal problems, Ocella may not be right for you. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers more safety information on Ocella, including why it is important to not miss any doses.
  • Ocufen and Breastfeeding
    It is known that the active ingredient in Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page explains whether the amount passed through breast milk would be enough to cause problems and covers the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Ocufen and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic) if you are expecting. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains why Ocufen is classified as a pregnancy Category C medication, with details on animal studies, likely outcomes in humans, and more.
  • Ocufen Dosage
    The standard dosing guidelines for Ocufen call for one drop to be applied to the eye every half hour. This eMedTV article discusses how long the drops are used and also provides some other helpful tips on how to use these eye drops.
  • Ocufen Drug Interactions
    Steroid eye medications and anticoagulants are some of the drugs that can cause interactions with Ocufen. This eMedTV Web selection examines a number of products that may cause problems with this eye drop and explains how to avoid adverse reactions.
  • Ocufen Medication Information
    Ocufen is prescribed to keep the pupils from becoming too small during eye surgery. This eMedTV article gives an overview of Ocufen, with information on how to use the medication and possible side effects that may occur with these eye drops.
  • Ocufen Overdose
    If you use too much Ocufen (flurbiprofen ophthalmic), flush your eye with clean water. This eMedTV segment describes what to expect with an overdose, including tips on what to do if you swallow the liquid.
  • Ocufen Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource explains that although the information on potential Ocufen side effects is vague, common problems include eye irritation, burning, and stinging. Other reactions to this eye drop are listed, including those that require medical care.
  • Ocufen Uses
    Ocufen eye drops are prescribed to keep the pupil from constricting during eye surgery. This eMedTV segment further describes this use of Ocufen, as well as a possible off-label (unapproved) use. This page also explains how Ocufen works.
  • Ocufen Warnings and Precautions
    Using Ocufen may increase your risk for slow wound healing and bleeding in the eye. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for Ocufen, including information on who should not use this drug.
  • Ocuflox and Breastfeeding
    As an eye drop, Ocuflox (ofloxacin ophthalmic solution) is unlikely to reach the breast milk. This part of the eMedTV site talks about Ocuflox and breastfeeding, listing some of the extra precautions to take if you are nursing while using this drug.
  • Ocuflox and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is unclear if Ocuflox is completely safe during pregnancy. However, as this eMedTV article explains, the drug is not expected to cause problems, since it is an eye drop and very little medication is thought to reach the bloodstream.
  • Ocuflox Antibiotic Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Ocuflox is used to treat conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers that are caused by bacteria. This resource offers more information on Ocuflox, including what to discuss with your doctor before using this antibiotic.
  • Ocuflox Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ocuflox eye drops are typically used several times a day. This article covers dosing guidelines for Ocuflox in more detail, including some tips that can help ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Ocuflox Drug Interactions
    In general, Ocuflox is not likely to cause interactions with other drugs. This eMedTV page discusses possible reactions with Ocuflox, with an explanation of why you should talk to your doctor about other medications you use, such as other eye drops.
  • Ocuflox Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, using too much Ocuflox (ofloxacin ophthalmic solution) in the eyes could lead to problems like eye irritation. This article takes a closer look at what to expect, as well as some potential symptoms of an oral overdose.
  • Ocuflox Side Effects
    Some of the most common side effects seen with Ocuflox include redness, itching, and stinging of the eye. This eMedTV page also outlines some of the more serious side effects that should be reported to a doctor, such as hives or worsening pain.
  • Ocuflox Uses
    The prescription drug Ocuflox has been approved to treat two types of bacterial eye infections. This eMedTV segment describes the uses of Ocuflox in more detail and lists some of the common symptoms of conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers.
  • Ocuflox Warnings and Precautions
    Although rare, severe allergic reactions are possible with Ocuflox. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides more warnings and precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment with Ocuflox, including what your healthcare provider needs to know.
  • Ocupress
    Ocupress is a prescription eye drop used to treat open angle glaucoma and high eye pressure. This eMedTV segment explores how Ocupress works, describes how to use the eye drop, and explains what side effects may occur with this medication.
  • Ocupress and Breastfeeding
    The full risks of using Ocupress (carteolol) while nursing are currently unknown. As this eMedTV segment explains, since no studies have been done on breastfeeding and Ocupress, it is not known whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Ocupress and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether Ocupress (carteolol) is safe to take if you're expecting. This eMedTV article provides more details on pregnancy and Ocupress, including information on what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Ocupress Dosage
    There is only one standard dose of Ocupress, regardless of your weight or the severity of your condition. As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended starting dosage is one drop of the medication in the affected eye(s) twice daily.
  • Ocupress Drug Information
    A prescription eye drop, Ocupress is used to treat high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV segment provides more information on Ocupress, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting this drug.
  • Ocupress Drug Interactions
    If you take Ocupress with methacholine, reserpine, or other beta blockers, drug interactions may occur. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions with Ocupress could lead to serious side effects (such as severe, asthma-like breathing problems).
  • Ocupress Overdose
    It is not known exactly what to expect from an overdose of Ocupress (carteolol). This page from the eMedTV library lists some of the predicted effects of an overdose and explains what steps your healthcare provider may take to treat the overdose.
  • Ocupress Side Effects
    Eye redness, burning, and irritation are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Ocupress. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects, as well as rare but potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Ocupress Uses
    Ocupress can help lower eye pressure in people with open angle glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV Web page discusses the uses of Ocupress in more detail, explains how the drug works, and explores the use of this medicine in children.
  • Ocupress Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Ocupress if you have asthma. This eMedTV page offers more information on who should not use this drug. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur with Ocupress are also included in this article.
  • Ofatumumab Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, the dose of ofatumumab depends on if other treatments have been tried. This article offers dosing information for this chemotherapy drug, including a list of precautions for what to expect during treatment.
  • Ofatumumab Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers information on ofatumumab, a drug prescribed to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia in adults. This page gives an overview of side effects, dosing tips, and general safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Off-Label Uses for Marinol
    Sometimes a healthcare provider will prescribe Marinol for a condition it is not approved to treat. This eMedTV article takes a look at these off-label Marinol uses, with an explanation of what that term means and a link to more information.
  • Off-Pump Bypass Surgery
    This eMedTV segment describes a typical off-pump bypass surgery in detail. This procedure involves opening the chest and, while the heart is beating, attaching a new blood vessel to increase flow to the heart.
  • Off-Pump Bypass Surgery Complications
    Nausea, vomiting, and minor bleeding are some of the common complications of off-pump bypass surgery. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at other complications that can occur and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Off-Pump Heart Bypass Surgery (OPCABG)
    This interactive video explains in detail what happens during a beating heart coronary artery bypass graft (OPCABG).
  • Ofirmev and Breastfeeding
    It is typically considered safe to use Ofirmev (intravenous acetaminophen) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web selection further discusses the research that has been done on this topic, including details on whether Ofirmev passes through breast milk.
  • Ofirmev and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Ofirmev (intravenous acetaminophen) hasn't been studied in pregnant women. This article further discusses this topic, explaining why the active ingredient in this drug is probably unlikely to cause problems for a fetus.
  • Ofirmev Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the dosage of Ofirmev your healthcare provider prescribes will depend on several factors, such as your age and weight. This article describes other factors that may affect your dose and outlines important dosing instructions.
  • Ofirmev Drug Interactions
    Many cough, cold, and allergy medications can negatively react with Ofirmev. This page of the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at other drug interactions with Ofirmev, as well as the possible complications these reactions can cause.
  • Ofirmev Medication Information
    Ofirmev is an intravenous (IV) form of acetaminophen prescribed to treat pain and reduce fever. This eMedTV page offers important information on Ofirmev, including how the medication is administered, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Ofirmev Overdose
    Vomiting and liver damage are possible effects of an overdose with Ofirmev (intravenous acetaminophen). This eMedTV page lists other symptoms a person might experience after receiving too much of this drug, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • Ofirmev Side Effects
    Nausea, vomiting, and headaches are some of the more common Ofirmev side effects. This eMedTV Web resource provides a more detailed list of problems you may experience while receiving this medication, with information on when to seek medical care.
  • Ofirmev Uses
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, Ofirmev is used for relieving pain and reducing fever. This article takes a closer look at specific uses for this intravenous (IV) form of acetaminophen. A description of how Ofirmev works is also provided.
  • Ofirmev Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Ofirmev if you have liver disease, alcoholism, or certain other health issues. This eMedTV page lists other warnings and precautions to be aware of before receiving Ofirmev, including what to tell your doctor.
  • Ofloxacin 300 Mg
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, most people take 200 to 400 mg of ofloxacin, although 300 mg may be prescribed in certain cases. This segment describes when a lower amount may be used and links to more information on this topic.
  • Ofloxacin 400 Mg Tab
    As this eMedTV resource explains, most people take 200 to 400 mg of ofloxacin when using the tablets. This page describes conditions that can affect the amount of ofloxacin a healthcare provider prescribes, with a link to more information on dosing.
  • Ofloxacin and Breastfeeding
    Oral ofloxacin has been studied in breastfeeding women; however, the other forms have not. This eMedTV resource discusses the problems that could occur when this drug is used by women who are breastfeeding and explains how these problems can be avoided.
  • Ofloxacin and Joint Problems
    Children under the age of 18 should not take ofloxacin tablets because of the risk of joint problems. This eMedTV article discusses this topic in more detail, explaining the results of animal studies and problems to watch for in children, like joint pain.
  • Ofloxacin and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page explains why the otic and ophthalmic forms of ofloxacin are safer for pregnant women than the oral form. It also describes the results of animal studies on this topic and when the oral form may still be prescribed.
  • Ofloxacin and Tendon Problems
    This page of the eMedTV archives takes a look at the link between tendon problems, such as tendonitis and tendon rupture, and ofloxacin use. It describes those who may be at an increased risk and provides a list of signs to watch for during treatment.
  • Ofloxacin Generic
    As this eMedTV article explains, both brand-name and generic forms of ofloxacin are available. This segment lists some of the conditions this drug can treat, as well as a few side effects. A link to more information on this medicine is also included.
  • Ofloxacin in Pregnancy
    For the most part, ofloxacin should not be used in pregnancy, although there are exceptions. This eMedTV Web page explains how this conclusion was reached based on animal studies and the pregnancy rating the FDA has given this prescription antibiotic.
  • Ofloxacin Ophthalmic Drug Information
    This eMedTV page gives some basic information on ofloxacin ophthalmic solution, a drug used for conjunctivitis ("pink eye") and corneal ulcers caused by bacteria. This article briefly describes the antibiotic and offers a link to more information on it.
  • Ofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    Ofloxacin ophthalmic solution is an antibiotic used for certain types of bacterial eye infections. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this eye drop, including information on side effects, when and how to apply it, safety concerns, and more.
  • Ofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that when using ofloxacin ophthalmic solution for pink eye, dosing usually starts at one or two drops in the infected eye every two to four hours for two days. This article also covers dosing for the treatment of corneal ulcers.
  • Ofloxacin Otic Medication Information
    Ofloxacin otic solution is a prescription ear drop used to treat bacterial ear infections. This eMedTV Web resource offers more information on ofloxacin otic, including side effects, safety warnings for the medication, and more.
  • Ofloxacin Otic Solution Dosage
    As this eMedTV page discusses, your dose of ofloxacin otic solution will depend on your age and the type of infection being treated. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists tips for how to safely and effectively use this ear drop.
  • Ofloxacin Overdose
    If too much ofloxacin is taken, overdose effects can include dizziness and nausea. However, as this eMedTV page explains, the effects will vary, depending on the form of ofloxacin that was used and how it was taken. Treatment options are also discussed.
  • Oforta Discontinued
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, Fludara is prescribed to treat B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV Web selection describes how this drug is given and explains why the tablet form (sold under the name Oforta) has been discontinued.
  • Ogen Alternatives
    Common Ogen (estropipate) alternatives include natural remedies, coping strategies, and other drugs. This eMedTV page explores these Ogen alternatives in more detail and includes a list of other hormone replacement medications that are available.
  • Ogen and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women are typically advised to avoid taking Ogen (estropipate). This eMedTV Web page includes more information on Ogen and breastfeeding, and discusses some of the potential dangers of using the drug while nursing.
  • Ogen and Pregnancy
    There is currently no accepted medical reason for pregnant women to use Ogen (estropipate). This eMedTV article offers more information on Ogen and pregnancy, and further explains why this drug should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Ogen Dosage
    For preventing osteoporosis, it is recommended to take your Ogen dosage cyclically (25 days on, 6 days off). This eMedTV segment provides Ogen dosing guidelines for osteoporosis prevention, menopause symptoms treatment, and estrogen replacement.
  • Ogen Drug Interactions
    If you take cyclosporine, barbiturates, or certain antifungals with Ogen, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV resource lists other medicines that may interact with Ogen and describes the potentially negative interactions that may occur.
  • Ogen HRT Information
    Ogen is used to treat menopause symptoms, prevent osteoporosis, and more. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of Ogen, including information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting hormone replacement therapy (HRT).
  • Ogen Overdose
    An Ogen (estropipate) overdose may cause nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding. This segment from the eMedTV Web site further describes the effects of an Ogen overdose and explains the treatment options that are available.
  • Ogen Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Ogen include hair loss, fluid retention, and nausea. As this page from the eMedTV site explains, while most Ogen side effects are minor, some require immediate medical attention, such as blood clots, strokes, or dementia.
  • Ogen Uses
    Ogen is primarily used for treating menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes or vaginal dryness. This eMedTV Web page also lists other approved Ogen uses, explains how the drug works for these conditions, and discusses possible off-label uses.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream
    Ogen Vaginal Cream is an estrogen medication often prescribed to treat vaginal menopause symptoms. This eMedTV segment describes the drug's effects, explains how it works, and offers information on how and when to apply the cream.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream and Breastfeeding
    Ogen Vaginal Cream (estropipate vaginal cream) is not recommended for use in breastfeeding women. This eMedTV page offers more information on Ogen Vaginal Cream and breastfeeding, and explains why it may be unsafe to breastfeed while using the drug.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream and Pregnancy
    Ogen Vaginal Cream (estropipate vaginal cream) is not approved for pregnant women. This eMedTV resource includes more information on Ogen Vaginal Cream and pregnancy, and explores the potential risks of using the drug while pregnant.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Dosage
    Various factors affect the Ogen Vaginal Cream dosage that you are prescribed, such as how you respond to it. This eMedTV article offers other Ogen Vaginal Cream dosing information, including tips and precautions for using the medicated cream.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Drug Interactions
    Cyclosporine, thyroid drugs, and protease inhibitors may cause Ogen Vaginal Cream drug interactions. This eMedTV page describes the potentially negative interactions that may occur if Ogen Vaginal Cream is combined with any of these drugs.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Overdose
    Vaginal bleeding and nausea are likely signs of an Ogen Vaginal Cream (estropipate vaginal cream) overdose. This eMedTV article lists other possible Ogen Vaginal Cream overdose effects and explains the treatment options that are available.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Side Effects
    Blood clots, strokes, and allergic reactions are serious but rare Ogen Vaginal Cream side effects. This eMedTV resource also lists some of the more common side effects of Ogen Vaginal Cream, such as vomiting, bloating, and vaginal yeast infections.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Uses
    Ogen Vaginal Cream is used for treating vaginal menopause symptoms, such as dryness or itching. This eMedTV Web page describes how the medication works and explains whether there are any universally accepted off-label Ogen Vaginal Cream uses.
  • Ogen Vaginal Cream Warnings and Precautions
    You should not use Ogen Vaginal Cream if you have a blood-clotting disorder. This eMedTV segment explains who else should not use Ogen Vaginal Cream. Warnings and precautions on what side effects may occur are also listed in this article.
  • Ogen Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Ogen, let your doctor know if you have endometriosis, asthma, or migraines. This eMedTV article lists other conditions your doctor must know about before you take Ogen. Warnings and precautions on who should avoid Ogen are also included.
  • Ogestrel
    Ogestrel is a prescription birth control pill that primarily works by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV page offers an overview of Ogestrel, including information on what to tell your doctor before using it, possible side effects, and dosing tips.
  • Ogestrel and Breastfeeding
    Ogestrel is generally not recommended for women who are breastfeeding. Ogestrel, as this eMedTV Web page explains, may decrease the quantity and quality of breast milk, and may also cause problems in a nursing infant (such as jaundice).
  • Ogestrel and Pregnancy
    Women who are pregnant should not intentionally use Ogestrel. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes a detailed look at Ogestrel and pregnancy, including information on how this birth control pill could cause miscarriages or birth defects.
  • Ogestrel Birth Control
    This part of the eMedTV Web site gives an overview of the birth control pill Ogestrel, with details on side effects, active ingredients, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information on this product.
  • Ogestrel Dosage
    The standard Ogestrel dosage is one tablet per day, taken at the same time each day. This eMedTV segment takes a further look at Ogestrel dosing guidelines, including how to start the drug for the first time and what to do if you miss any pills.
  • Ogestrel Drug Interactions
    Antibiotics, barbiturates, and seizure medicines are among the medicines that may interact with Ogestrel. This eMedTV Web article outlines specific medications that may cause Ogestrel drug interactions and describes the problems that may occur.
  • Ogestrel Overdose
    Nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding are possible symptoms of an Ogestrel overdose. This eMedTV article describes other possible effects of an overdose and discusses how a healthcare provider may treat any symptoms that occur.
  • Ogestrel Side Effects
    This eMedTV page explains that if you are taking Ogestrel for birth control, you may have a high risk of developing serious side effects, due to the high estrogen content in this pill. This page lists some common and serious Ogestrel side effects.
  • Ogestrel Uses
    Ogestrel is primarily used for preventing pregnancy in women of reproductive age. However, as this eMedTV page explains, there are also several off-label Ogestrel uses, such as treating heavy menstrual bleeding and painful or irregular periods.
  • Ogestrel Warnings and Precautions
    Ogestrel can make some health problems worse, such as high blood pressure and depression. This eMedTV resource lists other important Ogestrel warnings and precautions, including information on who should not use this type of birth control pill.
  • Olanzapine and Fluoxetine
    Olanzapine and fluoxetine is a prescription drug approved to treat depression due to bipolar disorder. This eMedTV resource discusses the uses of the medication in more detail, including how it works and possible side effects.
  • Olanzapine and Fluoxetine (Symbyax)
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have depression associated with bipolar disorder may benefit from olanzapine and fluoxetine (Symbyax). This article gives a brief overview of this drug and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Olanzapine and Fluoxetine Dosing
    For people with bipolar disorder, olanzapine and fluoxetine dosing usually starts at 6/25 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page also describes the factors that may determine your dosage and offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Olanzapine and Fluoxetine Side Effects
    Weight gain and drowsiness are among the common olanzapine and fluoxetine side effects. This eMedTV segment also lists less common side effects seen with the medication, as well as those that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Olanzapine Dosing
    For people with bipolar disorder, the recommended starting olanzapine dosage is 10 mg to 15 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of olanzapine dosing, and also includes information on when and how to take the drug.
  • Oleptro and Breastfeeding
    In general, you should use Oleptro (trazodone ER) with caution while nursing. This page of the eMedTV Web site further explores breastfeeding and Oleptro, including the potential problems this medication may cause in a nursing infant.
  • Oleptro and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies on pregnancy and Oleptro (trazodone ER) suggest that the drug may not be safe for pregnant women. This page describes problems that occurred in animal studies of this pregnancy Category C medication.
  • Oleptro and Sexual Problems
    Impotence, decreased sex drive, and abnormal orgasms are possible side effects of Oleptro (trazodone ER). This eMedTV Web article further describes sexual problems with Oleptro, including information on how often they occur and treatment options.
  • Oleptro Dosage
    The recommended dose of Oleptro for adults who are first starting treatment for depression is 150 mg daily. This eMedTV Web segment provides more dosing guidelines, including an explanation of how to take the medication safely.
  • Oleptro Drug Interactions
    Medicines that can potentially interact with Oleptro include tryptophan, digoxin, and lithium. This eMedTV page lists other medicines that may interfere with Oleptro and describes the possible consequences of these drug interactions.
  • Oleptro Medication Information
    Oleptro is an antidepressant prescribed for treating depression in adults. This eMedTV page provides important information on this medication, including possible Oleptro side effects and general safety precautions to be aware of before taking it.
  • Oleptro Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, serious problems can result from an overdose of Oleptro (trazodone ER), such as seizures, a coma, or even death. This page lists other possible overdose symptoms and describes various treatment options.
  • Oleptro Side Effects
    Common Oleptro side effects may include headaches, drowsiness, and nausea. As this eMedTV page explains, most side effects are mild and don't require medical attention. However, notify your doctor if you develop serious problems, such as hallucinations.
  • Oleptro Uses
    Oleptro is prescribed for the treatment of depression in adults. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how the medication works and also lists possible off-label Oleptro uses, such as the treatment of insomnia or anxiety.
  • Oleptro Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Oleptro safely if you have low blood pressure or heart disease. This eMedTV page lists important Oleptro warnings and precautions to be aware of, including potentially serious side effects and possible drug interactions.
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