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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Levitra Information - Lisinopril and Hair Loss

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Levitra Information to Lisinopril and Hair Loss. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Levitra Oral
    Available in the form of a tablet, Levitra is an oral medication used to treat erectile dysfunction. This eMedTV Web page gives an introduction to this drug and how it works. A link to more detailed information on this medicine is also provided.
  • Levitra Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV Web page lists some Levitra precautions and warnings, such as people who shouldn't take the drug (like those who are allergic to Levitra or its components), and the importance of telling your doctor about all other drugs you're taking.
  • Levitra Tabs
    This eMedTV page explains that the tablet (tab) form of Levitra is typically taken one hour before sexual activity. This article includes a brief overview of how to effectively use this erectile dysfunction drug and links to more detailed information.
  • Levitra Uses
    Levitra is used mainly to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). This part of the eMedTV Web site describes how Levitra works in the body and lists some "off-label" Levitra uses, such as the treatment of pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud's phenomenon.
  • Levlite and Breastfeeding
    It is generally recommended that breastfeeding women avoid taking Levlite. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Levlite and breastfeeding, and explains why breastfeeding women may want to avoid combined oral contraceptives.
  • Levlite and Pregnancy
    Women should never intentionally take Levlite during pregnancy. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, studies on Levlite and pregnancy show that accidentally taking the pill early in pregnancy will probably not cause serious problems.
  • Levlite Dosage
    There is only one standard way to dose Levlite, regardless of your age or weight. This eMedTV page offers general Levlite dosage guidelines, including information on how to start Levlite, and explains what you should do if you miss any doses.
  • Levlite Drug Interactions
    Medications that may cause Levlite drug interactions include theophylline, St. John's wort, and antibiotics. This eMedTV page lists some of the other drugs that may interact with Levlite and discusses the potential risks of these interactions.
  • Levlite Overdose
    A Levlite overdose is unlikely to cause serious problems, but you should still seek medical attention. This eMedTV article describes the symptoms that may occur with an overdose of Levlite and explains what treatments are available for an overdose.
  • Levlite Uses
    Although Levlite is primarily used for preventing pregnancy, it can also be used for off-label uses. This eMedTV Web page discusses some of these possible off-label Levlite uses and explains how this form of birth control works.
  • Levlite Warnings and Precautions
    Levlite can change your menstrual bleeding patterns. This eMedTV segment includes a list of other side effects or problems that may occur with Levlite. Warnings and precautions on who should not take Levlite are also included in this article.
  • Levobunolol Dosage
    The typical starting dosage of levobunolol is one to two drops in the affected eye once or twice daily. This eMedTV page further discusses dosing guidelines for high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma, including tips for taking this eye drop.
  • Levobunolol Drug Information
    If you are looking for information on levobunolol, this eMedTV page is a great place to start. It features an overview of what the drug is used for, basic dosing guidelines, and what you can do to help ensure a safe treatment.
  • Levocetirizine Dosing
    This eMedTV page explains that levocetirizine dosing guidelines are based on several factors, such as your age and other medicines you are taking. This page provides dosing information for adults and children, and offers tips for taking the drug.
  • Levofloxacin Dosage
    There is no standard recommended levofloxacin dosage that will work for all situations. This eMedTV article explains what your doctor will consider before making levofloxacin dosing recommendations and offers tips and precautions for using this drug.
  • Levofloxacin Eye Drop Information
    Levofloxacin ophthalmic solution is a drug prescribed to treat bacterial eye infections and corneal ulcers. This eMedTV page offers more information on levofloxacin ophthalmic solution, including how this eye drop works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Levofloxacin Medication Information
    Are you looking for information on levofloxacin? This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at this medication, discussing the conditions this antibiotic can treat, what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it, and more.
  • Levofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    Levofloxacin ophthalmic solution is prescribed to treat corneal ulcers and certain bacterial eye infections. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth look at this eye drop, providing details on its dosing, possible side effects, safety warnings, and more.
  • Levofloxacin Ophthalmic Solution Dosage
    As this eMedTV page discusses, your dose of levofloxacin ophthalmic solution will depend on the type and severity of the infection being treated. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists tips for using this prescription eye drop.
  • Levofloxacin Uses
    Levofloxacin is used for treating various bacterial infections in adults, such as bronchitis and pneumonia. This eMedTV Web page discusses other approved levofloxacin uses and also lists possible off-label uses for the medication.
  • Levomilnacipran Dosage
    For many people starting levomilnacipran, dosing generally begins at 20 mg once daily. This section of the eMedTV archives discusses treatment guidelines in more detail and provides precautions and tips for those taking the antidepressant.
  • Levomilnacipran Drug Information
    As an SNRI medicine, levomilnacipran may be prescribed to treat the symptoms of depression. This eMedTV article discusses this more, including how this drug works on certain brain chemicals. It also offers information on possible side effects.
  • Levomilnacipran Side Effects
    Nausea, a fast heart rate, and constipation are some of the common side effects of levomilnacipran. This eMedTV article describes other common and serious problems that may occur in some people. It also discusses when to seek urgent medical care.
  • Levonest
    Available by prescription only, Levonest is a type of oral contraceptive, or birth control pill. This eMedTV article gives an in-depth overview of this product, explaining how it works, what to expect when taking it, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Levonest Birth Control Information
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers some basic information on Levonest, a type of birth control pill. This article tells you what you need to know about how to take it, what to expect, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Levonest Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Levonest comes in tablet form and is taken once a day, every day. This article takes an in-depth look at the dosing guidelines for Levonest, including instructions on what to do if you miss a pill.
  • Levonest Side Effects
    As this eMedTV segment explains, some of the most commonly reported side effects reported with birth control pills like Levonest include bloating and breast tenderness. This page provides a more detailed list of possible reactions to Levonest.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System
    Women who want to prevent pregnancy may consider the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. This eMedTV resource offers a comprehensive overview of this product, including information on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains whether it is safe to use levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system while breastfeeding. This includes details on whether the hormone in the device would pass through breast milk and how it might affect a nursing infant.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV resource explains, levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system should not be used during pregnancy. This article describes what to do if pregnancy occurs while you are using this device and the problems that may result.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the standard levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system dosage contains a certain amount of hormone that is slowly released over time. Tips to ensure the device's effectiveness are also included.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System Information
    Levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is a device inserted into the uterus to prevent pregnancy. This eMedTV article provides more information on levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, including how long it's used, side effects, and more.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System Overdose
    No cases have been reported of someone overdosing on levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. This eMedTV page discusses whether it is possible to receive too much of the hormone in it and describes possible treatment options.
  • Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System Side Effects
    Common levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system side effects may include headaches and acne. This eMedTV article lists various problems that can occur while using this contraceptive device, including those that may require prompt medical care.
  • Levora Dosing
    It is important to take your Levora dose (one tablet daily) at the same time each day. This eMedTV page offers Levora dosing guidelines, including information on how to start the pill for the first time, and explains what to do if you miss any doses.
  • Levothroid and Breastfeeding
    Levothroid is considered safe for breastfeeding women and their infants. This eMedTV resource further discusses Levothroid and breastfeeding, including information on why Levothroid is considered safe and sometimes beneficial for breastfeeding women.
  • Levothroid and Hair Loss
    There does appear to be a connection between Levothroid and hair loss. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that if you are taking Levothroid and hair loss occurs, it may be an indication that your Levothroid dosage is too high.
  • Levothroid and Insomnia
    Insomnia is a side effect that has been reported in people taking Levothroid. This eMedTV segment further discusses the link between Levothroid and insomnia, and explains why this side effect may signal that your Levothroid dose is too high.
  • Levothroid and Pregnancy
    Clinical studies of Levothroid and pregnancy have shown that the drug is safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV page explains that if you have thyroid problems, taking Levothroid during pregnancy can actually help prevent certain problems.
  • Levothroid Dosage
    When treating thyroid problems with Levothroid, dosing guidelines will vary from person to person. This eMedTV page explains why there is no standard Levothroid dosage and provides some tips for when and how to take the medication.
  • Levothroid Drug Interactions
    Antacids, iron, and calcium are some of the substances that may cause Levothroid drug interactions. This eMedTV Web article outlines other substances that may negatively interact with Levothroid and describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Levothroid Overdose
    This eMedTV segment explains how taking even a little too much Levothroid can cause dangerous overdose symptoms (such as seizures and strokes). This article lists other Levothroid overdose symptoms and describes possible treatment options.
  • Levothroid Uses
    Levothroid is used for treating thyroid problems in adults, children, and infants. This eMedTV Web page discusses Levothroid uses in more detail, including information on how the drug works and possible off-label uses (such as treating depression).
  • Levothroid Warnings and Precautions
    Levothroid can affect your blood sugar levels and may increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. This eMedTV page lists other complications that may occur with Levothroid. Warnings and precautions on who should not take the drug are also included.
  • Levothyroxine and Breastfeeding
    Levothyroxine passes through breast milk, but shouldn't cause any problems when used appropriately. This eMedTV page further discusses levothyroxine and breastfeeding, explaining why women with thyroid problems may need the drug in order to breastfeed.
  • Levothyroxine and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is a possible side effect of levothyroxine. This portion of the eMedTV library explains that if you are taking levothyroxine and hair loss becomes a problem, it may mean that your levothyroxine dosage is too high or too low.
  • Levothyroxine and Insomnia
    As this eMedTV page explains, insomnia is a possible side effect of levothyroxine. However, if you are taking levothyroxine and insomnia occurs, it may be a signal that your dosage is too high. This page also describes what your doctor may recommend.
  • Levothyroxine and Pregnancy
    The FDA has determined that it is safe to take levothyroxine during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource contains more information on levothyroxine and pregnancy, explaining why it may be dangerous not to treat a thyroid problem during pregnancy.
  • Levothyroxine Overdose
    A levothyroxine overdose can cause dangerous side effects, such as seizures or strokes. This eMedTV page explains how easy it is to overdose on levothyroxine and stresses the importance of seeking prompt medical care if you do overdose on the drug.
  • Levoxyl and Breastfeeding
    Although Levoxyl does pass through breast milk, it is generally considered safe for use when breastfeeding. This eMedTV page explains that if you are taking Levoxyl and breastfeeding, you and your baby are unlikely to have problems.
  • Levoxyl and Hair Loss
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that hair loss does appear to be a rare side effect of Levoxyl. This segment explains what your healthcare provider may recommend if you are taking Levoxyl and hair loss occurs.
  • Levoxyl and Insomnia
    If you are taking Levoxyl and insomnia occurs, your Levoxyl dosage may be too high. This eMedTV segment explains that insomnia is a side effect of Levoxyl, although it is not known how often this side effect occurs in people taking the drug.
  • Levoxyl and Pregnancy
    It is safe to take Levoxyl during pregnancy. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at Levoxyl and pregnancy, explaining why Levoxyl is a pregnancy Category A drug and why your doctor may need to increase your Levoxyl dosage during this time.
  • Levoxyl Drug Interactions
    This portion of the eMedTV library explores potential Levoxyl drug interactions with other medications, such as digoxin, antacids, and antidepressants. This Web article also explains how these negative interactions can cause complications.
  • Levoxyl Overdose
    A Levoxyl overdose can occur if just a little too much of the medication is taken. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes possible symptoms of a Levoxyl overdose (such as strokes and a coma) and describes possible treatment options.
  • Levoxyl Uses
    Levoxyl is typically used for treating hypothyroidism, goiters, and certain types of cancer. This part of the eMedTV Web library describes these Levoxyl uses in more detail, including how Levoxyl works, off-label uses, and its use in children.
  • Levoxyl Warnings and Precautions
    Levoxyl can make heart problems worse and may increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. This eMedTV Web page highlights other important Levoxyl warnings and precautions, including what to tell your doctor before taking the medication.
  • Lexapro and Breastfeeding
    As this part of the eMedTV archives explains, a doctor may prescribe Lexapro to a woman who is breastfeeding if he or she decides that the benefits outweigh the possible risks. If you have concerns about Lexapro and breastfeeding, talk to your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Burning Sensation
    As this eMedTV page explains, 2 percent of people on Lexapro have burning sensations described as tingling or numbness, skin crawling, or itching. If you're taking Lexapro and burning sensations occur, you should contact your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Decreased Appetite
    Side effects may occur with Lexapro, and decreased appetite is one of them. This eMedTV Web page provides more detail on this side effect, which occurs just as often in those taking the drug for depression as it does in those taking it for anxiety.
  • Lexapro and Dry Mouth
    If you are taking Lexapro and dry mouth occurs, you can sip water more often or during meals. This eMedTV page offers other tips on dealing with dry mouth, such as avoiding drinks with caffeine, using a humidifier at night, and chewing sugarless gum.
  • Lexapro and Impotence
    Occurring in up to 3 percent of men who take Lexapro, impotence is one of the drug's common side effects. This eMedTV Web page defines impotence and explains that if you're taking Lexapro and impotence occurs, you should talk with your doctor.
  • Lexapro and Insomnia
    Some people have side effects with Lexapro, and insomnia is among the most common. This eMedTV page discusses how common insomnia is in people taking this drug and lists tips for dealing with insomnia -- such as keeping a regular sleep-wake cycle.
  • Lexapro Precautions and Warnings
    Bleeding in the stomach or intestines can occur in some people who take Lexapro. This eMedTV page discusses other Lexapro warnings and precautions, such as who shouldn't take the drug and the safety of taking it while pregnant.
  • Lexapro Side Affects
    Nausea and fatigue are among the common side effects of Lexapro. This eMedTV page also lists side effects of Lexapro to report to your doctor (such as hostility or aggressiveness). Lexapro side affects is a common misspelling of Lexapro side effects.
  • Lexiva and Breastfeeding
    Women taking Lexiva should avoid breastfeeding to help prevent transmitting HIV to their babies. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at Lexiva and breastfeeding, and further explains the risks of nursing if you have HIV or AIDS.
  • Lexiva and Pregnancy
    According to animal studies, Lexiva may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Lexiva and pregnancy, and describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant rabbits.
  • Lexiva Dosage
    Adults who have taken protease inhibitors before usually take Lexiva 700 mg with Norvir 100 mg twice daily. This eMedTV page also offers Lexiva dosage guidelines for adults who have never taken protease inhibitors and describes dosing for children.
  • Lexiva Drug Information
    Lexiva is a medication used in the treatment of HIV and AIDS. As this eMedTV article explains, it is designed for use in combination with other HIV medications. This resource has more information on Lexiva, with details on how often the drug is taken.
  • Lexiva Drug Interactions
    Calcium channel blockers, paroxetine, and warfarin may cause negative Lexiva drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, these interactions can reduce the effectiveness of the drugs or increase your risk for dangerous side effects.
  • Lexiva Overdose
    A Lexiva overdose may cause increased liver enzymes. This article from the eMedTV archives further describes the possible effects of a Lexiva overdose, including factors that may affects symptoms and the various treatment options that are available.
  • Lexiva Side Effects
    Vomiting, fatigue, and headaches are some of the most commonly reported Lexiva side effects. This eMedTV segment lists other side effects that have been reported with Lexiva, including serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Lexiva Uses
    Lexiva is used for preventing HIV from multiplying and spreading to uninfected cells in the body. This eMedTV Web page discusses Lexiva uses in more detail (including possible off-label uses) and explains how the drug works for treating HIV and AIDS.
  • Lexiva Warnings and Precautions
    Lexiva may cause skin rashes in some people. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that may occur with Lexiva. Warnings and precautions regarding the safety of taking the drug if you have certain medical conditions are also included.
  • Lialda and Breastfeeding
    Since Lialda passes through breast milk, it is possible for side effects to occur in a nursing infant. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Lialda and breastfeeding, and describes the side effects to be aware of.
  • Lialda and Pregnancy
    While the full risks of using Lialda during pregnancy are not known, the drug is generally considered safe. This eMedTV article explores Lialda and pregnancy, and explains how a doctor determines whether the drug is appropriate for pregnant women.
  • Lialda Dangers
    Although most people tolerate it well, Lialda can cause side effects like decreased urination and headaches. This eMedTV page takes a quick look at potentially dangerous side effects of this drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Lialda Dosage
    For the treatment of ulcerative colitis, most people take a Lialda dosage of two to four tablets once daily. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Lialda dosing, including precautions and tips for when and how to take the drug.
  • Lialda Drug Class
    As this eMedTV page explains, Lialda belongs to a drug class known as aminosalicylates and works to reduce inflammation caused by ulcerative colitis. This article gives a brief overview of how this drug works and provides a link to more details.
  • Lialda Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may lead to Lialda drug interactions include digoxin and warfarin. As this page on the eMedTV Web site explains, these drug interactions may decrease the effectiveness of the medications, among other things.
  • Lialda Indications
    Treating ulcerative colitis is the primary use (or "indication") for Lialda. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of the uses for this prescription medication and provides a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Lialda Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web selection provides some basic information on Lialda, a medication used to treat ulcerative colitis. This resource also discusses how this prescription medicine works, dosing information, and why it may not be safe for some people.
  • Lialda Oral
    Available in the form of oral tablets, Lialda is a medicine used for ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV resource briefly describes this product, including information on how it performed in clinical trials. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Lialda Overdose
    Confusion, vertigo (dizziness), and diarrhea are possible symptoms of a Lialda overdose. This eMedTV Web page describes the treatment options that are available for an overdose and lists other potential symptoms that may occur.
  • Lialda Risks
    If you have liver disease, it may not be a good idea to take Lialda. This eMedTV segment takes you through a few of the safety concerns for Lialda, including information on how it may increase your risk of kidney damage and other problems.
  • Lialda Safety
    Some people develop problems, such as kidney damage, while taking Lialda. This eMedTV Web resource discusses how to ensure your safety with Lialda, with information on who may not be able to take the drug and when to contact your doctor.
  • Lialda Side Effects
    Gas and headache are the most common Lialda side effects that were reported in clinical studies. As this eMedTV segment explains, there are also other side effects that are less common, as well as serious problems that may require medical attention.
  • Lialda Uses
    Lialda is a prescription drug that is used for treating flare-ups of ulcerative colitis. This part of the eMedTV archives describes how Lialda works, explains whether the drug can be used in children, and lists possible "off-label" Lialda uses.
  • Lialda Warnings and Precautions
    Lialda may be less effective in people with pyloric stenosis. This eMedTV page offers other Lialda warnings and precautions, including a list of existing medical conditions your doctor should know about and possible side effects that may occur.
  • Librium Addiction
    Librium addiction is more likely if the medicine has been taken for a long period of time or in high doses. This eMedTV resource explains some of the symptoms of Librium withdrawal and describes ways of dealing with a Librium addiction.
  • Librium and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Librium passes through women's breast milk. However, as this eMedTV page explains, if you are taking Librium and breastfeeding at the same time, be sure to watch for any side effects in your child (such as extreme drowsiness).
  • Librium and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is generally considered unsafe to take Librium during pregnancy, because the drug may increase the risk of birth defects. This article offers an in-depth look at Librium and pregnancy.
  • Librium Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains that the recommended starting Librium dosage for treating alcohol withdrawal is 50 mg to 100 mg per day. This page also discusses Librium dosing for anxiety in children and adults, and offers tips on taking the medicine.
  • Librium Drug Interactions
    Sleep medications and seizure medicines are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Librium. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth look at these and other Librium drug interactions, including information on the side effects that can result.
  • Librium Uses
    Librium is used for treating alcohol withdrawal and anxiety. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at Librium uses, including its use in children and off-label uses of the drug (such as treating insomnia).
  • Librium Warnings and Precautions
    Librium can cause depression or can lead to a psychological or physical dependence on the drug. This eMedTV Web page highlights other Librium warnings and precautions to be aware of, including a list of people who should not take Librium.
  • Librium Withdrawal
    A Librium withdrawal can lead to symptoms such as hallucinations, depression, and memory loss. This eMedTV page discusses the danger of suddenly stopping Librium and explains the importance of talking with your doctor before you stop taking Librium.
  • Lichen Sclerosus and Cancer
    While no evidence links lichen sclerosus and cancer, having the disease may increase a person's risk for it. This eMedTV segment further discusses lichen sclerosus and skin cancer.
  • Lichen Sclerosus and Sex
    Pain and scarring can be associated with lichen sclerosus, and sex may be hard for some women as a result. This eMedTV article discusses further the link between lichen sclerosus and sex.
  • Licorice and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for women who are breastfeeding to consume real licorice. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further discusses potential problems that could occur when consuming real licorice and breastfeeding at the same time.
  • Licorice and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for pregnant women to take real licorice products. This eMedTV page explains the potential complications, such as preterm labor or effects on estrogen levels, that could happen if you are taking licorice and pregnancy occurs.
  • Licorice Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is no established licorice dosage that is considered to be safe or effective. This page also covers the possible risks of using licorice medicinally and offers some tips on finding a reputable manufacturer.
  • Licorice Drug Interactions
    Taking licorice with certain drugs, such as blood pressure medicines or digoxin, can cause serious problems. This eMedTV Web site lists the medicines that may cause licorice drug interactions and describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Lidex and Breastfeeding
    You might not be able to use Lidex (fluocinonide) while breastfeeding, as the potential risks are unknown. This eMedTV segment discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and why you should not expose your child to direct contact with Lidex.
  • Lidex and Pregnancy
    It is not known if it is safe to use Lidex (fluocinonide) while pregnant. This eMedTV article describes what happened when steroids were given to pregnant animals, and explains why the FDA classifies Lidex as a pregnancy Category C medicine.
  • Lidex Dosage
    The standard dose of Lidex is to apply a thin layer to the affected area two to four times daily. This eMedTV segment describes the factors that may affect your dosage and outlines some important tips for when and how to apply this medicine.
  • Lidex Drug Interactions
    Taking certain medications in combination with Lidex may cause negative reactions. This eMedTV resource describes the interactions that may occur when Lidex is combined with drugs such as aldesleukin or corticorelin, and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Lidex Overdose
    As this eMedTV article discusses, an overdose with Lidex (fluocinonide) may lead to Cushing's syndrome or cause your body to stop producing its own natural steroids. This page describes other possible overdose symptoms and also covers treatment options.
  • Lidex Side Effects
    Acne and increased sweating are some of the possible side effects of Lidex. This page of the eMedTV Web site lists other possible reactions to this skin medication, including long-term effects and potentially serious problems that require medical care.
  • Lidex Uses
    A doctor may recommend Lidex to treat dermatitis, eczema, and various other skin conditions. This eMedTV resource outlines other approved and unapproved uses for Lidex, and explains whether this highly potent steroid is safe for use in children.
  • Lidex Warnings and Precautions
    A person who is using certain medicines or who has certain allergies may not be able to safely use Lidex. This eMedTV page explores important safety warnings and precautions with Lidex, including potentially serious problems this drug may cause.
  • Lidocaine Patch Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, you can typically use up to three lidocaine patches each day (for up to 12 hours in a 24-hour period). This page offers more information on dosing with the lidocaine patch, including some tips on how to use this product.
  • Lidoderm and Breastfeeding
    It is known that Lidoderm (lidocaine patch) does pass through breast milk. This eMedTV page further explores breastfeeding and Lidoderm, including issues to discuss with your doctor before nursing a child and details on what he or she may recommend.
  • Lidoderm Dosage
    When treating post-shingles nerve pain, up to three Lidoderm patches can be used at once. This eMedTV page further discusses the general dosing guidelines for the Lidoderm patch, including some tips on when and how to use this medication.
  • Lidoderm Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV resource explains that some of the products that may cause drug interactions with the Lidoderm patch include certain antiarrhythmic medicines and local anesthetics. This article also describes how to reduce your risk of interactions.
  • Lidoderm Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on Lidoderm, a skin patch prescribed to treat a certain type of pain that can occur after a case of shingles. This article describes possible side effects of the medication, safety precautions, and more.
  • Lidoderm Overdose
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that you should seek immediate medical attention if you consume or use too much of the Lidoderm patch (lidocaine patch). This page also lists possible treatment options for a Lidoderm overdose.
  • Lidoderm Uses
    This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that the Lidoderm patch is used to treat nerve pain following a case of shingles. This article also describes how the prescription pain medication works and covers possible off-label uses for the skin patch.
  • Lidoderm Warnings and Precautions
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, some of Lidoderm's warnings and precautions involve potential drug interactions and possible side effects. This page also explains what your doctor needs to know before you use this medicine.
  • Life Lessons
    At some point in life, most kids learn how to swallow tablets and capsules. At that point, life gets much easier for parents, especially if a kid takes a daily medication. No measuring, no spilling, no mixing, and no mess. However, it is a skill that must be learned. Is your kid at least four or five years old? You can start trying to teach him or her, although some kids may be ready earlier or later. Practice with Tic Tacs or other very small candies that won't be choking hazards.
  • Lifestyle Changes (GERD Treatment)
    Lifestyle changes may help alleviate your GERD symptoms, as this media clip explains.
  • Lifestyle Changes for CFS
    Lifestyle changes for CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) may involve learning how to better cope with stress. This eMedTV article explores different lifestyle changes for CFS patients, which may include carefully increasing one's physical activity.
  • Lifestyle Changes for Controlling High Blood Pressure
    Lifestyle changes are the first form of treatment for high blood pressure. This video clip explain lifestyle choices
  • Lifestyle Choices
    Smoking, sedentary lifestyles, low dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D, and chronic alcohol abuse can all increase the risk for osteoporosis. Prolonged immobilization (no matter what the cause) can also increase the risk. The good news is that these risk factors are often modifiable. That means you can change them. Nobody is saying it will be easy, but stopping smoking, becoming more active, and drinking less alcohol can all help improve bone health. Getting enough calcium and vitamin D, however, is usually as simple as adding a supplement or paying attention to your diet. Your healthcare provider can help guide you in such lifestyle changes and may have other additional pointers to lower your risk.
  • Lifting Techniques for Preventing Back Injuries
    Proper lifting techniques, such as using your legs and pivoting rather than twisting, can go a long way in preventing back injuries. This segment of the eMedTV website includes a list of correct lifting techniques to help avoid back injuries.
  • Lifting Your Own Body Weight
    What could be simpler and less expensive than using your own body weight as resistance to build muscle strength? Push-ups, squats, and toe stands (going up on your tiptoes and then back down) are examples of exercises that require no special equipment.
  • Like a Sore Thumb: Adult ADHD and (Not) Fitting In
    Are you an adult with ADHD? Do you struggle with social situations, often feeling like you don't fit in? This eMedTV resource is for you! We address common ADHD behaviors and how they manifest in social situations, with helpful tips on avoiding gaffes.
  • Limbitrol Addiction
    As with all drugs, it is possible to become addicted to Limbitrol. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Limbitrol addiction, describes the potential risks of becoming addicted, and offers suggestions for dealing with an addiction.
  • Limbitrol and Alcohol
    It is potentially dangerous to combine Limbitrol and alcohol. As this eMedTV Web page explains, since both are CNS depressants and can slow down brain activity, combining the two can lead to potentially serious side effects or complications.
  • Limbitrol and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding while taking Limbitrol may cause serious problems in a nursing infant. This eMedTV article further discusses Limbitrol and breastfeeding, and describes the potential problems that may occur when the drug is passed through breast milk.
  • Limbitrol and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is one of the more commonly reported Limbitrol side effects. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Limbitrol and dry mouth, lists suggestions that may provide relief, and explains what treatments your doctor may recommend.
  • Limbitrol and Pregnancy
    Research shows that it may be dangerous for pregnant women to use Limbitrol. This eMedTV Web page discusses the results of studies on Limbitrol and pregnancy in more detail and explains the possible risks of using the drug while pregnant.
  • Limbitrol Dosage
    Most people start with a Limbitrol dosage of three to four tablets each day. This article from the eMedTV archives covers Limbitrol dosing guidelines in more detail and includes tips and precautions for those taking the medication.
  • Limbitrol Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on Limbitrol, a drug approved to treat depression associated with anxiety. This article looks at dosing guidelines and safety warnings, and provides a link to more details on this product.
  • Limbitrol Drug Interactions
    Drugs that may cause negative interactions with Limbitrol include barbiturates, cimetidine, and narcotics. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that may lead to Limbitrol drug interactions and explains what can occur as a result.
  • Limbitrol Overdose
    If you take too much Limbitrol, overdose symptoms may include drowsiness, vomiting, and fever. This eMedTV segment describes other potential effects of a Limbitrol overdose and explains what treatments your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Limbitrol Side Effects
    Common Limbitrol side effects may include blurred vision, dry mouth, and dizziness. This eMedTV segment also lists less common problems and describes potentially serious side effects of Limbitrol that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Lisdexamfetamine Dimesylate
    This eMedTV article gives an overview of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, a drug used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It explains when and how the medication is taken, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Lisinapril
    As this eMedTV page explains, lisinopril is prescribed to treat several heart and blood vessel conditions. This page discusses how lisinopril works and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Lisinapril is a common misspelling of lisinopril.
  • Lisinopril 30 mg Tablets
    A doctor may prescribe 30 mg lisinopril tablets to treat several heart or blood vessel conditions. This eMedTV Web segment further discusses general lisinopril dosing guidelines and describes the factors that may affect your dosage.
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