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eMedTV Articles A-Z

LASIK - Levitra for Women

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from LASIK to Levitra for Women. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • LASIK
    LASIK is a laser eye surgery that can permanently reshape the cornea of your eye to correct your vision. This eMedTV page discusses various eye conditions that the surgery can fix and offers details on the expected results and possible complications.
  • LASIK Complications
    As this eMedTV page explains, while it is generally a safe procedure, there are possible problems that may occur with LASIK. Complications may include inflammation, severe infection, severe bleeding, and flap complications.
  • LASIK Eye Surgery
    In LASIK eye surgery, a laser technique is used to reshape the cornea of your eye to help correct vision. This eMedTV article explains the steps involved in this surgery, the intended goals, and expected results of the procedure.
  • LASIK Surgery Recovery
    When recovering from LASIK surgery, which usually takes 24 to 48 hours, you must frequently apply eyedrops. This eMedTV segment describes symptoms you may experience and offers tips on the healing process and preventing infections.
  • LASIK Vision Correction
    People interested in vision correction often turn to LASIK surgery. This section of the eMedTV archives takes a brief look at this procedure, explaining the conditions it can treat, what happens during the surgery, and what happens afterward.
  • Lasix
    Lasix is a prescription medicine that is used to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article explains how Lasix works to decrease blood volume, offers tips for when and how to take the drug, and lists potential side effects.
  • Lasix (Furosemide) Medication Information
    Lasix is often prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and water retention. This eMedTV article contains more information about the prescription medication Lasix (furosemide), including details on how it works and how often it is taken.
  • Lasix 20 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for Lasix, 20 mg tablets are the lowest strength. This page from the eMedTV site offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of high blood pressure and water retention, and explains how dosing for Lasix works in children.
  • Lasix 40 mg Tablets
    Adults being treated for high blood pressure typically start with Lasix 40 mg tablets. This article on the eMedTV Web site explains how often this drug is taken per day and provides Lasix dosing guidelines for the treatment of water retention.
  • Lasix and Constipation
    You should know that if you are taking Lasix, constipation is a possible side effect. As this eMedTV Web article explains, Lasix has been studied thoroughly in clinical trials, and constipation was reported as one of the common adverse reactions.
  • Lasix and Hearing Loss
    Several side effects can occur with Lasix, and hearing loss has been reported. As this eMedTV page explains, this drug can cause various hearing problems, including tinnitus, and describes situations in which this reaction may be more likely to occur.
  • Lasix Dosage
    The recommended starting dose of Lasix for high blood pressure is 40 mg twice daily. This eMedTV resource also outlines the dosage recommendations for treating fluid retention and discusses dosing guidelines for children and infants.
  • Lasix Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site offers important information on Lasix, a drug used to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This page also explains why this medication is not suitable for everyone and offers general dosing guidelines.
  • Lasix Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page lists medicines that can potentially cause Lasix drug interactions, such as hydrocortisone, lithium, or NSAIDs. These interactions can cause low potassium levels or increase your risk of permanent hearing loss, among other things.
  • Lasix for Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)
    This eMedTV article explains that if you have congestive heart failure, Lasix can help treat symptoms of fluid retention. This page discusses how this medication works and how it can help treat conditions such as CHF that cause the body to retain fluid.
  • Lasix Oral
    Lasix is an oral medication commonly used for treating water retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page describes the specific effects of this medicine and offers general information on when and how to take it, with a link to learn more.
  • Lasix OTC
    There is no Lasix OTC (over-the-counter) available, as this drug can only be obtained with a prescription. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of Lasix, including information on what it is used to treat, how it works, and general precautions.
  • Lasix Overdose
    Lasix overdose symptoms may include weakness, dizziness, or vomiting. This portion of the eMedTV library offers a more detailed list of other possible overdose symptoms, overdose effects, and some of the treatment options that are available.
  • Lasix Side Effects
    This portion of the eMedTV archives contains a list of potential side effects of Lasix, such as diarrhea, vertigo, and sensitivity to the sun. This resource also outlines some of the more serious side effects that require immediate attention.
  • Lasix Without a Prescription
    Lasix is not available without a prescription. Lasix, as this eMedTV page explains, is approved for treating high blood pressure and fluid retention. This page also covers why this drug is not suitable for everyone and offers general dosing guidelines.
  • Last Stage of COPD
    A person who has severe COPD is classified as being in the last stage of COPD. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of what to expect during this final stage stage, including information on possible treatment options that may be beneficial.
  • Latanoprost
    Latanoprost is an eye drop approved to reduce eye pressure in people with glaucoma or high eye pressure. This eMedTV segment describes how this medicine works, explains when and how to use it, and lists possible side effects to be aware of.
  • Late Symptoms of Hepatitis C
    When the liver becomes badly damaged with cirrhosis and liver failure occurs, late symptoms of hepatitis C may develop. This eMedTV article covers the late symptoms of hepatitis C, such as slowed mental function, intestinal bleeding, and itchy skin.
  • Latent Tuberculosis
    Latent tuberculosis is the more common form of tuberculosis. As this eMedTV page explains, this form of tuberculosis takes place when bacteria in the body become inactive but remain alive, sometimes becoming active later.
  • Latesse
    Latisse, a prescription drug used to enhance eyelashes, works by increasing the growth phase of eyelashes. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of the drug and offers some general dosing guidelines. Latesse is a common misspelling of Latisse.
  • Latex Allergy
    A latex allergy is a reaction to certain proteins in latex rubber. As this eMedTV article explains, it can result in symptoms such as skin rash, hives, and itching. This page also offers tips on minimizing your exposure to latex.
  • Latex Allergy Symptoms
    Mild latex allergy symptoms may include rash, hives, and itching. As this segment from the eMedTV library explains, more severe symptoms can involve respiratory problems. Ways to minimize signs and symptoms of latex allergies are also discussed.
  • Latice
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Latisse for adults who want thicker, longer, and darker eyelashes. This eMedTV segment highlights possible side effects and offers some general precautions for the medication. Latice is a common misspelling of Latisse.
  • Latisse
    Latisse is a prescription medication used to help enhance the length and thickness of eyelashes. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on how it works, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Latisse Eye Drops
    As a prescription eye drop, Latisse is used on each eye once daily to enhance eyelashes. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at Latisse, including its effects on eyelashes and why it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Latisse Eyelash Growth
    As this eMedTV article explains, Latisse is a prescription medicine used to enhance eyelashes. This Web page describes how Latisse works for eyelash growth, including information on how long it takes to notice the effects.
  • Latisse Side Effects
    Eye itching and redness are some of the reported Latisse side effects. This page of the eMedTV site provides an overview of other possible side effects, listing common ones as well as potentially serious reactions that may require prompt medical care.
  • Laufender
    Lavender can be taken orally, used as an essential oil, or applied to the skin. This eMedTV page explores the benefits of lavender and explains what you should be aware of before using lavender products. Laufender is a common misspelling of lavender.
  • Lavandare
    Lavender is claimed to be useful for medicinal purposes, such as for treating insomnia or depression. This eMedTV Web page further explores the benefits and potential side effects of lavender products. Lavandare is a common misspelling of lavender.
  • Lavander
    Lavender is used as an herbal remedy, aromatherapy oil, and flavoring agent in beverages and foods. This eMedTV segment covers other lavender uses and lists possible side effects that may occur. Lavander is a common misspelling of lavender.
  • Lavaquin
    Levaquin, an antibiotic, is approved to treat various types of bacterial infections. As this eMedTV article explains, Levaquin can also be used to prevent infection after exposure to inhaled anthrax. Lavaquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Lavaza
    Lovaza is a prescription medication used for treating very high triglycerides. This eMedTV Web page describes Lovaza in more detail and explains why it may be safer than over-the-counter fish oil supplements. Lavaza is a common misspelling of Lovaza.
  • Lavendar
    Lavender is a plant that is used in various products and can also be used medicinally. This page on the eMedTV site lists purported benefits of lavender and lists some of its potential side effects. Lavendar is a common misspelling of lavender.
  • Lavender
    Lavender is a flowering plant used for aromatherapy, as an herbal remedy, and for various other uses. This eMedTV article explores the purported benefits of lavender, discusses the product's effectiveness, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Lavender and Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether lavender products are safe for pregnant women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this topic, with a reminder on why you shouldn't assume that "natural" products are always safe.
  • Lavender Aromatherapy
    Aromatherapy is probably one of the more familiar uses for lavender, but as this page of the eMedTV site explains, there is little evidence supporting its benefit as a medicinal product. This segment explores this use and links to more information.
  • Lavequin
    Levaquin, a prescription drug, is used to prevent infection after exposure to inhaled anthrax. This eMedTV article discusses other approved Levaquin uses and lists possible side effects of this medicine. Lavequin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Lavinder
    Lavender is claimed to be beneficial for conditions such as insomnia, depression, and hair loss. This eMedTV article discusses lavender uses in more detail and lists potential side effects of the product. Lavinder is a common misspelling of lavender.
  • Lavitra
    Levitra is a drug that is often prescribed to treat erectile dysfunction. This eMedTV page describes the effects of Levitra, lists side effects that may occur, and links to more information about the drug. Lavitra is a common misspelling of Levitra.
  • Laytex Allergies
    A latex allergy is caused specifically by contact with natural rubber latex. This page of the eMedTV archives takes a brief look at this condition and includes a link to more information. Laytex allergies is a common misspelling of latex allergy.
  • LDL
    LDL, also known as "bad" cholesterol, is a substance used to transport cholesterol throughout the body. This eMedTV page explains how too much of this cholesterol in the blood can build up on artery walls and lead to problems, like a heart attack.
  • LDL Bad Cholesteral
    This eMedTV segment explores LDL cholesterol (or "bad cholesterol"). As this article explains, people with higher LDL levels are at greater risk for heart disease. LDL bad cholesteral is a common misspelling and variation of LDL cholesterol.
  • LDL Cholesterol
    As explained in this eMedTV article, LDL cholesterol (also known as "bad cholesterol") is another name for low density lipoprotein, a substance used to transport cholesterol in the body. Too much of it can increase the risk for heart disease.
  • Lecithen
    Lecithin, a dietary supplement, is claimed to be useful for treating high cholesterol and liver disease. This eMedTV segment explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this product. Lecithen is a common misspelling of lecithin.
  • Lecithin
    Lecithin is a dietary supplement claimed to be beneficial for many conditions, including high cholesterol. This eMedTV page describes other potential benefits of lecithin, explores its safety and effectiveness, and lists its potential side effects.
  • Lecithin Benefits
    Lecithin is claimed to be beneficial for a number of conditions, including anxiety and dementia. This eMedTV resource lists other potential lecithin benefits, explores how the supplement may work, and discusses the use of this product in children.
  • Lecithin Side Effects Review
    Potential lecithin side effects include abdominal pain or fullness, diarrhea, and nausea. As this eMedTV segment explains, people with egg or soy allergies may also develop allergic reactions to lecithin (since lecithin is derived from egg or soy).
  • Lecithin Supplement Information
    Are you looking for information on lecithin supplements? This eMedTV article is a great place to start. It lists some of the conditions lecithin can supposedly treat, explores its effectiveness and possible risks, and links to more information.
  • Leena
    Leena is a birth control pill that contains an estrogen and a progestin; it works by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV page provides an overview of this drug, including information on its possible side effects, dosing tips, and general precautions.
  • Leflunomide
    Leflunomide is a prescription medicine used to relieve the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. This segment of the eMedTV archives takes a detailed look at this drug, including how it works, its various effects on the body, dosing, and more.
  • Left Ventricular Assist Device
    As this eMedTV article explains, a left ventricular assist device helps the heart pump blood throughout the body by taking blood from the left ventricle and delivering it to the aorta. This article offers an in-depth look at this device.
  • Leg Cellulitis
    This eMedTV Web page describes leg cellulitis, which is a condition characterized by redness, warmth, swelling, and pain. Causes of the condition, risk factors, common symptoms, the diagnostic process, and treatment options are also described.
  • Lenalidomide
    Lenalidomide is a drug used to treat myelodysplastic syndrome and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page examines various aspects of this medicine, including details on how it works, when and how to take it, safety concerns, and more.
  • Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome
    This eMedTV Web page explains that Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is a severe form of epilepsy that can result in developmental delays in children. The causes, symptoms, and treatment of this disorder are also featured in this article.
  • Leprosy
    Leprosy is a complex infectious disease caused by an infection with the bacteria Mycobacterium leprae. This eMedTV article discusses the disease in detail, including its history, transmission methods, the various types, treatments, and prevalence.
  • Leprosy -- American Statistics
    According to this eMedTV page, each year in the United States, there are 200 to 250 new cases of leprosy. American statistics on the disease show that the largest numbers of cases are in California, Texas, and Florida, and affect mostly immigrants.
  • Leprosy Disease
    This page of the eMedTV site takes a look at the disease leprosy, which is a contagious bacterial infection. This segment discusses its effects in the body, the different types, and treatment options, with a link to learn more.
  • Leprosy Facts
    This eMedTV resource presents some important facts on leprosy, a disease that has long been misunderstood -- and possibly even misidentified. This page explores different aspects of leprosy and links to more information.
  • Leprosy in the United States
    There are 200 to 250 new reported cases of leprosy in the United States each year. This eMedTV page explains how 175 of these are cases diagnosed for the first time. The page also lists the states and populations where the disease is often found.
  • Leprosy Information
    If you are looking for information on leprosy, this eMedTV segment is a great place to start. It discusses one possible transmission method and how the disease is treated, with a link to a full-length article on this topic.
  • Leprosy Skin Lesions
    This eMedTV article discusses leprosy skin lesions in detail for both types of the disease. For example, slightly red patches of skin that appear on the trunk or extremities, or a symmetrical skin rash are two possible indications of leprosy.
  • Leprosy Statistics
    This eMedTV article offers a variety of leprosy statistics, both worldwide and in the United States. For example, there are approximately 6,500 U.S. cases of leprosy, and the disease is more common in tropical areas, like South America.
  • Leprosy Symptoms
    About three to five years after becoming infected with the bacteria that cause leprosy, symptoms begin. This eMedTV article discusses these symptoms in detail for the two types of leprosy and explains why they can vary.
  • Leprosy Treatment
    People with leprosy can receive treatment for free from their doctor or through a Hansen's Disease Clinic. This eMedTV article discusses the various treatment options in detail, including antibiotics commonly used and supportive care.
  • Lescol
    Lescol is a prescription medication commonly used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at this drug and its uses, possible side effects, and dosages, with links to additional information.
  • Lescol Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, common side effects of Lescol include headache, diarrhea, and indigestion. This article also lists rare but possible side effects that may occur, such as muscle pain, dark urine, and unexplained rash.
  • Lescol XL
    This eMedTV page describes Lescol XL, a medicine used to treat high cholesterol, high triglycerides, and other conditions related to heart disease. This article offers a complete overview of this drug, including its uses, side effects, and more.
  • Lessina
    Lessina is a combined oral contraceptive, one of the most common types of birth control pill. This eMedTV page describes how Lessina prevents pregnancy, explains how to use this form of birth control, and lists potential side effects that may occur.
  • Lessina Side Effects
    Breast lumps, depression, and jaundice are serious Lessina side effects that require medical attention. As this eMedTV page explains, however, most side effects are minor. Some of the more common side effects are also listed on this page.
  • Letairis
    Letairis is prescribed to treat arterial hypertension (PAH). This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at this medication, with information on how it works, how it is taken, possible side effects, and more.
  • Lethicin
    Lecithin is a supplement often claimed to be beneficial for conditions such as bipolar disorder. This eMedTV resource explores other possible lecithin benefits and offers general warnings for the product. Lethicin is a common misspelling of lecithin.
  • Letrazole
    Postmenopausal women with certain forms of breast cancer are often prescribed letrozole as a treatment. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at the drug and offers a link to more in-depth information. Letrazole is a common misspelling of letrozole.
  • Letrozol
    Letrozole is approved for postmenopausal women with certain forms of breast cancer. This page of the eMedTV archives offers a brief description of the drug, including dosing information and side effects. Letrozol is a common misspelling of letrozole.
  • Letrozole
    Letrozole may be given to a postmenopausal woman as a treatment for breast cancer. This eMedTV page offers an overview of the drug, noting its effects, the types of breast cancer that it can treat, and precautions to be aware of prior to taking it.
  • Leukemia
    Leukemia is a cancer of the blood and bone marrow in which the body produces abnormal white blood cells. This eMedTV article offers an overview of leukemia, including information about types of the disease, its symptoms, and its treatment.
  • Leukemia and 6-MP
    As this eMedTV article explains, acute lymphatic leukemia may be treated with mercaptopurine, or 6-MP, a chemotherapy drug used to slow down the growth of cancer cells. This page covers more details on what it is approved for, how it works, and more.
  • Leukemia and Busulphan
    Adults and children with chronic myelogenous leukemia may benefit from busulfan. This eMedTV page describes this prescription drug in more detail and lists some dosing information. Leukemia and busulphan is a common misspelling of leukemia and busulfan.
  • Leukemia and Clofarabine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, acute lymphoblastic leukemia may be treated with clofarabine when at least two other forms of treatment have failed. This page covers more information on what this drug is approved for, details on how it works, and more.
  • Leukemia and Fludara
    As this eMedTV article explains, chronic lymphocytic leukemia may be treated with Fludara, a chemotherapy drug used after other treatment has failed. This article provides more information on what it is approved for, details on how it works, and more.
  • Leukemia and Fludarabine
    As explained in this page of the eMedTV Web site, fludarabine is prescribed to treat a certain type of leukemia. This article explains how this chemotherapy drug works to slow down the progression of this disease. It also links to more details.
  • Leukemia and Mitoxantrone
    Adults who have certain types of leukemia may receive mitoxantrone. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes specific uses for this prescription drug, along with some unapproved uses as well. This page also offers a link to more details.
  • Leukemia and Treanda
    A doctor may prescribe Treanda to adults who have a certain type of leukemia called CLL. This eMedTV Web page examines this and other possible uses of Treanda, with details on how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Leukemia and Vincasar PFS
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, Vincasar PFS is prescribed to treat certain types of leukemia. This article explains how this chemotherapy drug works to slow down the progression of this disease. It also links to more details.
  • Leukemia and Vincristine
    As this eMedTV article explains, doctors may prescribe vincristine to treat acute leukemia. This resource covers more information on what this drug is approved for and how it works. It also offers a link to more details on this topic.
  • Leukemia Cells
    Leukemia cells are abnormal cells produced by blood-forming tissue. As this segment of the eMedTV Web site explains, there are two main types of these cells and they cause different symptoms and types of leukemia.
  • Leukemia Chemotherapy Drug Bendamustine
    You may receive bendamustine as a type of chemotherapy drug for a certain type of leukemia. This eMedTV segment contains details on specific uses for this drug and describes how this prescription medication works to help kill cancer cells.
  • Leukemia Chemotherapy Drug Fludarabine
    This eMedTV Web resource gives a brief description of fludarabine, a chemotherapy drug used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It explains how it works and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Leukemia Chemotherapy Treatment
    In cases of leukemia, chemotherapy treatment uses anticancer drugs to kill leukemia cells. This eMedTV article explains how chemotherapy may be administered to people with this condition and describes the side effects associated with this treatment.
  • Leukemia Diagnosis
    As explained on this eMedTV Web page, diagnosing leukemia will usually involve a physical exam and certain tests and procedures. This article offers more details on blood tests, biopsies, chest x-rays, and other methods of diagnosing this illness.
  • Leukemia Information
    Are you looking for information on leukemia? This eMedTV article is a good place to start. It presents a brief overview of this condition, covering possible symptoms and treatment options, with a link to more detailed information.
  • Leukemia Research
    Current areas research on leukemia include studies examining new types of treatment. This eMedTV page outlines some of the research currently under way, including information on work being done on stem cell transplantation.
  • Leukemia Risk Factors
    There are certain factors that increase a person's chances of developing leukemia. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at some of these leukemia risk factors, such as exposure to very high levels of radiation and undergoing chemotherapy.
  • Leukemia Statistics
    Based on leukemia statistics, 35,070 people will be diagnosed with the disease in the United States in 2006. This eMedTV page contains various statistics on this disease, including survival rates, age-at-diagnosis figures, and lifetime risk percentages.
  • Leukemia Symptoms
    For people with leukemia, symptoms commonly include fevers, night sweats, frequent infections, and fatigue. This eMedTV article describes signs and symptoms of this disease, which may also include bruising easily, weight loss, and headaches.
  • Leukemia Treatment
    As this eMedTV page explains, treatment options for leukemia may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery. This article discusses these and other treatments, and includes information about side effects, second opinions, and clinical trials.
  • Leukemia Types
    This selection from the eMedTV archives lists the different leukemia types and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Leukeran
    Leukeran is a drug licensed to help relieve symptoms of lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV article contains more details on this medicine, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, potential side effects, and more.
  • Leuprolide
    Available by prescription only, leuprolide is used to treat a number of conditions, including endometriosis. This eMedTV article gives an overview of this drug, including details on how it works, potential side effects, how it is administered, and more.
  • Leuprolide Acetate Drug Information
    This portion of the eMedTV library offers some basic information on leuprolide acetate, a drug used in the treatment of prostate cancer and certain other conditions. This Web page gives a brief overview of the medicine and gives a link to more details.
  • Levalbuterol
    Levalbuterol is a prescribed medicine that is used to treat or prevent airway spasms. This eMedTV article provides an overview of the drug, including information on how it works, conditions it is used to treat, and some of its side effects.
  • Levalbuterol HFA
    Levalbuterol HFA is a prescription inhaler that is used to treat airway spasms caused by asthma or COPD. This eMedTV segment further discusses the drug's uses, explains how the inhaler works, and describes possible side effects that may occur.
  • Levamere
    Levemir is a prescription medicine licensed to treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web resource explains how Levemir works and describes possible signs of an overdose. Levamere is a common misspelling of Levemir.
  • Levamir
    Levemir is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at this medication and provides a link to more detailed information. Levamir is a common misspelling of Levemir.
  • Levaquin
    Levaquin is a prescription drug licensed to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web page describes how Levaquin works, explains when and how to take the medicine, and provides a list of potential side effects that may occur.
  • Levaquin 500 mg Tablets
    Levaquin tablets come in three different strengths, including 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg. This eMedTV Web page explains how dosing works for this medication and discusses the importance of finishing your entire Levaquin prescription.
  • Levaquin 750 mg Tablets
    There are currently three strengths available for Levaquin tablets: 750 mg, 500 mg, and 250 mg. This eMedTV Web page explains what other forms and strengths are available for this medication and offers general dosing information.
  • Levaquin Dosage
    There is no standard dose of Levaquin that is recommended for all situations. This eMedTV Web page lists factors your doctor will consider before making Levaquin dosage recommendations and explains how long treatment typically lasts.
  • Levaquin Interactions
    Warfarin, NSAIDs, and quinapril are some of the drugs that may cause negative Levaquin interactions. This eMedTV article provides a more complete list of drugs that may interact with Levaquin and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Levaquin Oral
    There are two common forms of Levaquin: oral solution (liquid) and tablets. This article from the eMedTV library explains what this medication is used for, describes how it works, and offers general information on when and how to take your dose.
  • Levaquin Overdose
    In animal studies, a Levaquin (levofloxacin) overdose caused shakiness, seizures, and droopy eyelids. This eMedTV Web page describes the other potential effects of a Levaquin overdose and lists various treatment options that are available.
  • Levaquin Risks
    Levaquin may cause liver damage and other potentially serious problems. This segment from the eMedTV archives discusses other potential Levaquin risks and lists both common side effects of the drug, as well as rare but potentially serious problems.
  • Levaquin Side Affects
    Some common side effects of Levaquin include headaches, nausea, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web segment lists other common and potentially serious problems seen with this drug. Levaquin side affects is a common misspelling of Levaquin side effects.
  • Levaquin Side Effects
    Constipation, insomnia, and dizziness are some of the most commonly reported Levaquin side effects. This eMedTV page also lists rare but possible side effects, other common side effects, and serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Levaquine
    The antibiotic Levaquin is used for treating various types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV article explains what else Levaquin is used for and describes how this prescription drug works. Levaquine is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levaquinn
    Infections caused by certain types of bacteria can be treated with Levaquin, an antibiotic. This eMedTV segment explores other Levaquin uses and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Levaquinn is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levatol
    Levatol is a beta blocker medication often prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains how the medicine works, offers dosing information, lists some of the potential side effects to be aware of, and more.
  • Levemir
    Levemir is licensed for the treatment of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web article explains how Levemir works and further explores the effects and potential side effects of this long-acting insulin medication.
  • Levemir Insulin Information
    Are you looking for information on Levemir? This selection from the eMedTV site gives an overview of this long-acting insulin product, with information on how it is taken, what to expect, and more. A link to more details on Levemir is also provided.
  • Levequin
    Levaquin is used to treat bacterial infections and prevent infection after exposure to inhaled anthrax. This eMedTV resource explains how Levaquin works and lists potential side effects of the drug. Levequin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levetiracetam
    People experiencing partial, myoclonic, or generalized tonic clonic seizures may benefit from levetiracetam. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, offers precautions to be aware of when taking the drug, and lists possible side effects.
  • Levetra
    Levitra is a prescription drug used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). This eMedTV page provides information on how and when to take Levitra, its common side effects, and people who shouldn't take it. Levetra is a common misspelling of Levitra.
  • Levimere
    As a long-acting insulin, Levemir can treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web segment provides a brief overview of the drug and describes some of its possible side effects. Levimere is a common misspelling of Levemir.
  • Levimir
    A doctor may prescribe Levemir to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers a brief description of the drug and explains what to tell your doctor before taking it. Levimir is a common misspelling of Levemir.
  • Leviquan
    Levaquin is an antibiotic that can be given after exposure to inhaled anthrax to prevent infection. This eMedTV page covers more common Levaquin uses and explains what to be aware of before using the drug. Leviquan is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Leviquin
    Levaquin is a prescription antibiotic used for treating many different kinds of bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment covers other Levaquin uses and explains what to be aware of before using this drug. Leviquin is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Leviquinn
    If you have been exposed to inhaled anthrax, your doctor may prescribe the antibiotic Levaquin. This eMedTV Web page explains what else Levaquin is used for and describes how the drug works. Leviquinn is a common misspelling of Levaquin.
  • Levitiracetam
    This eMedTV page explains how the prescription drug levetiracetam works to treat certain types of epileptic seizures. This page also covers side effects and some levetiracetam alternatives. Levitiracetam is a common misspelling of levetiracetam.
  • Levitra
    Available only by prescription, Levitra is a drug that is used to treat erectile dysfunction (ED). This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at Levitra, including side effects, dosing guidelines, available strengths, and more.
  • Levitra 10 mg Tablets
    This portion of the eMedTV Web library explains that the typical starting dose of Levitra tablets is 10 mg. This article also describes when this amount may be adjusted and offers tips on when and how to effectively take this prescription medication.
  • Levitra 20 mg Tablets
    Your doctor may recommend Levitra 20 mg tablets to treat erectile dysfunction. This selection from the eMedTV site offers a brief overview of the dosing guidelines for this prescription medicine and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Levitra Addiction
    Levitra is not an addictive or habit-forming drug. However, as this eMedTV page explains, men with certain medical conditions may need to continue to take Levitra to achieve an erection (this does not mean that they have a Levitra addiction).
  • Levitra Alternatives
    If Levitra causes bothersome side effects or is not treating your condition, there are other options. This eMedTV segment describes several alternatives to Levitra, such as lifestyle changes, other medications, surgery, or vacuum devices.
  • Levitra Dangers
    Although most men have no problems with Levitra, dangerous side effects are possible. This eMedTV Web article briefly describes important safety concerns to be aware of with this medication and includes links to more in-depth information.
  • Levitra Dosage
    This eMedTV page lists the recommended starting Levitra dosage (10 mg), some general tips on dosing with Levitra (like always taking the drug as prescribed), and several factors that can affect the dosage your doctor recommends (such as your age).
  • Levitra for Women
    This eMedTV article explains why only men can take Levitra and women should not take it. This is due largely to how the drug works, which this page also explains. A link to more information on the approved uses for Levitra is provided as well.
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