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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Interstitial Cystitis - Janumet and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Interstitial Cystitis to Janumet and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Interstitial Cystitis
    Interstitial cystitis is a bladder condition that can cause pain, as well as a frequent need to urinate. This eMedTV article provides detailed information on the condition, including common symptoms, possible causes, treatment options, and more.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Clinical Studies
    This eMedTV article highlights the potential benefits of participating in clinical studies for interstitial cystitis. For example, one study is looking at the effectiveness of amitriptyline as a treatment method, which may help people manage pain.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Diet
    People with interstitial cystitis often avoid alcohol, tomatoes, spices, chocolate, and high-acid foods. This eMedTV article discusses the possible effect adhering to a so-called "interstitial cystitis diet" may have on the condition.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Food List
    As this eMedTV page explains, keeping a food list can help determine which foods may make your interstitial cystitis symptoms worse. Common foods that tend to aggravate symptoms include tomatoes, spices, and chocolate.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Symptoms
    Bladder pain and an urgent, frequent need to urinate are some of the symptoms of interstitial cystitis. This eMedTV Web page lists several possible interstitial cystitis symptoms and stresses the importance of seeing a doctor if they occur.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Treatment
    This eMedTV article takes a look at interstitial cystitis treatment options, including bladder distention and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. Self-help strategies and the use of medications are also discussed.
  • Interstitiial Cystitis
    Interstitial cystitis is a chronic illness that causes bladder pain and discomfort. This eMedTV article discusses its symptoms, possible causes, and who it affects. Interstitiial cystitis is a common misspelling of interstitial cystitis.
  • Interstitual Cystitis
    Interstitial cystitis causes pain in the bladder and adjoining pelvic area. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of the condition and provides a link to more information. Interstitual cystitis is a common misspelling of interstitial cystitis.
  • Intertistial Cystitis
    Interstitial cystitis, which causes an inflamed bladder wall, can lead to pain and discomfort. This eMedTV page lists symptoms and complications associated with the condition. Intertistial cystitis is a common misspelling of interstitial cystitis.
  • Interviewing a Pediatrician
    Before your baby is due, it is a good idea to interview prospective pediatricians. This eMedTV segment lists several questions you may want to ask while interviewing pediatricians, as well as tips on finding the right doctor for your baby.
  • Intestinal Gas
    Intestinal gas occurs as a result of swallowed air or the breakdown of foods, especially carbohydrates. This eMedTV segment discusses this topic in detail, with information on causes, symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Intraocular Melanoma
    Intraocular melanoma is a rare form of cancer that develops in the eye and occurs most often in middle age. This eMedTV resource describes this condition in detail, explaining how it is diagnosed, staged, and treated.
  • Intravenous CellCept
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, receiving CellCept through an intravenous (IV) infusion twice daily can help prevent transplant rejection. This article also covers general safety issues with this medicine and offers a link to more details.
  • Introducing Solids -- What Every Parent Should Know
    Most babies are able to start eating solid foods between four to six months of age. This eMedTV Web site offers information on what every parent should know when introducing solids to their baby, including what foods you should try first.
  • Intuniv
    Intuniv is a nonstimulant drug used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This eMedTV segment provides an in-depth overview of this medication, including the age group it is used for, side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Intussusception
    Intussusception is a condition in which one part of the intestine tunnels into an adjoining section. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this condition, including information about its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Invage
    Invega is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of schizophrenia. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at Invega and its effects, possible side effects, and overdose symptoms. Invage is a common misspelling of Invega.
  • Invega
    If you have schizophrenia, your doctor may prescribe Invega. This section of the eMedTV Web site explains how the prescription drug works and discusses its effects, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Invega (Paliperidone) Drug Information
    Invega is a prescription medication commonly used for controlling symptoms of schizophrenia. This eMedTV page offers more details on Invega (paliperidone), including how the drug works and what you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Invega Drug Information
    There is a lot of information about the drug Invega that you should be aware of before starting treatment. This eMedTV resource describes the specific effects of Invega, explains when and how to take this medicine, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Invega Drug Information
    Invega is a prescription antipsychotic medication licensed to treat schizophrenia. This page from the eMedTV Web site contains more information on this medicine, including details on how Invega works and how dosing is determined for this drug.
  • Invega for Schizophrenia
    Doctors often prescribe the medication Invega to treat the symptoms of schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource talks more about treating schizophrenia with Invega and explores the specific effects of this antipsychotic medicine.
  • Invega Oral
    An oral medication, Invega is a prescription drug used for the treatment of schizophrenia. This eMedTV article explains how Invega works, describes its specific effects, and offers general information on when and how to take this medicine.
  • Invega Sustena
    As this eMedTV page explains, adults who have schizophrenia may benefit from Invega Sustenna. This page describes side effects and general safety precautions to be aware of with this drug. Invega Sustena is a common misspelling of Invega Sustenna.
  • Invega Sustenna
    People with schizophrenia may benefit from the prescription medicine Invega Sustenna. This page of the eMedTV Web library presents a detailed overview of this injected medication, including how it works, how it is given, and possible side effects.
  • Invega Sustenna 156 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that a 156-mg dose of Invega Sustenna is usually given as a second dose, one week after the initial dose. This article takes a brief look at how this antipsychotic drug is given and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Invega Sustenna Dosing
    Your healthcare provider will inject Invega Sustenna into a muscle. This eMedTV segment offers a brief look at dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna and provides a link to more specific details on how your dosage will be determined.
  • Invirase
    Invirase is typically prescribed to treat HIV or AIDS. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of this medication, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips for when and how to take it.
  • Invocana
    Invokana is a prescription drug approved to help treat adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explores Invokana in more detail and offers general precautions for using the drug. Invocana is a common misspelling of Invokana.
  • Invokana
    Invokana is taken once daily to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV segment discusses how this medicine works, lists potential side effects, covers dosing tips, and examines various other topics.
  • Invokana and Other Diabetes Meds
    Taking Invokana with other diabetes meds may cause your blood sugar levels to become too low. This eMedTV page examines some of the diabetes medications that may cause problems when taken with Invokana. It also links to other possible drug interactions.
  • Invokana Dosing
    Available as 100-mg and 300-mg tablets, Invokana is taken once daily to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explores Invokana dosing guidelines, including recommended starting amounts and when your dose is taken. It also links to more dosing tips.
  • Invokana Mechanism of Action
    Wondering how Invokana works? This eMedTV resource describes the drug's mechanism of action within the body. It also covers basic dosing guidelines and includes links to more details.
  • Invokana Side Effects
    Yeast infections, bladder infections, and dizziness are some of the possible side effects of Invokana. This eMedTV segment contains more specific details on possible reactions, including problems that may be dangerous and require medical care.
  • Inzulin
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how insulin works to control blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This Web article also describes the importance of insulin in the body. Inzulin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Ipatropium
    Ipratropium is used to treat COPD or a runny nose. This article in the eMedTV library explains the various forms of ipratropium that are available and lists the factors that may affect your dosage. Ipatropium is a common misspelling of ipratropium.
  • Ipatropium Bromide
    As this eMedTV article explains, ipratropium is a prescription drug used to treat COPD and a runny nose. This page also offers some general precautions of the medication. Ipatropium bromide is a variation and common misspelling of ipratropium.
  • Ipatropium Bromide Nasal Spray
    This eMedTV page explains how ipratropium nasal spray can treat a runny nose due to the common cold or allergies, and offers general precautions. Ipatropium bromide nasal spray is a variation and common misspelling of ipratropium nasal spray.
  • Ipilimumab
    Ipilimumab is a drug prescribed to treat melanoma skin cancer by slowing down the spread of the disease. This eMedTV Web page presents an overview of this medication, with details on dosing guidelines, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Ipilumumab
    As this eMedTV article explains, people who have a certain type of skin cancer called melanoma may benefit from ipilimumab. This page describes some dosing instructions and potential side effects. Ipilumumab is a common misspelling of ipilimumab.
  • IPOL
    IPOL is an injectable vaccine often given during childhood to prevent polio. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes how this vaccination works, explains when and how to receive it, and lists some of the potential side effects to be aware of.
  • Ipratropium
    Ipratropium is a prescription medicine that comes in several forms and treats a runny nose and COPD. This eMedTV page offers an overview of the drug, including information about how it works, potential side effects, and tips on taking it.
  • Ipratropium Bromide Inhalation Solution
    Ipratropium bromide inhalation solution is a prescription drug that is used to treat COPD. This page on the eMedTV site explains how ipratropium bromide inhalation solution works and offers suggestions on when and how to use the medication.
  • Ipratropium Nasal Spray
    A healthcare provider may prescribe ipratropium nasal spray to treat a runny nose caused by several factors. This eMedTV resource explains in detail how the medication works, offers general dosing information, and lists possible side effects.
  • Ipratroprium
    This eMedTV page explains that a doctor may prescribe ipratropium to treat a runny nose or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This page also lists potential side effects of ipratropium. Ipratroprium is a common misspelling of ipratropium.
  • Ipriflavone
    Ipriflavone is a synthetic version of isoflavone, a plant compound similar to estrogen. This portion of the eMedTV library discusses this substance in detail and explains how it is still undetermined whether taking it prevents bone loss.
  • Ipriflavone for Osteoporosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, some postmenopausal women are interested in taking ipriflavone instead of hormone therapy for treatment of osteoporosis. This segment takes a closer look, including some of the preliminary research on this topic.
  • IPV
    IPV is a routine childhood vaccine that provides protection against polio. This article from the eMedTV library lists various IPV products currently available, offers information on when and how to get vaccinated, and describes how the vaccine works.
  • IPV Side Effects
    High fever and weakness or paralysis are some of the rare but serious side effects of IPV. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, most reactions to the vaccine are mild and do not require medical attention, such as tiredness or irritability.
  • Iquix
    The prescription eye drop Iquix is used to treat corneal ulcers, which are a type of eye infection. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed look at this medication, with information on when and how to use it, side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Irbesartan
    Irbesartan is a prescription drug used for the treatment of high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the drug and its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Irbesartan Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource offers a list of common irbesartan side effects that may occur, such as fatigue, diarrhea, and heartburn. Side effects that should be reported to your doctor, as well as rare but possible reactions, are also provided.
  • Iresa
    Iressa, a chemotherapy drug, is prescribed for treating non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV resource contains details on when this drug is used and why it is not typically used in the United States. Iresa is a common misspelling of Iressa.
  • Iressa
    Iressa is a medicine licensed to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This page of the eMedTV Web library features more details on this chemotherapy drug, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Irimidex
    Arimidex is used to treat breast cancer that is hormone receptor-positive in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of the drug and links to more information. Irimidex is a common misspelling of Arimidex.
  • Irinotecan
    Irinotecan is a prescription medication used to treat certain colon and rectal cancers. This page of the eMedTV Web site features more detailed information on this chemotherapy drug, including how it is given, how it works, safety issues, and more.
  • Irinotecan for Ovarian Cancer
    Giving irinotecan to women with ovarian cancer is an unapproved (off-label) use for the drug. This eMedTV article describes how this drug works, and also lists other unapproved uses for irinotecan. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Irinotecan in Pancreas Cancer
    If you have cancer of the pancreas, irinotecan may be prescribed as part of your chemotherapy treatment. This eMedTV segment explains, however, that this is considered an off-label (unapproved) use for the drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Iritable Bowel Syndrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a digestive condition that tends to affect women more than men. This eMedTV page lists symptoms of the condition, as well as treatment options. Iritable bowel syndrome is a common misspelling of irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Irratable Bowel Syndrome
    While it can't be cured, irritable bowel syndrome can be managed. This eMedTV page lists symptoms and possible treatment options, and links to more information. Irratable bowel syndrome is a common misspelling of irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Irritable Bowel Disease
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site provides important information on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), including detail on why IBS is not considered a disease, symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, and some of the treatment options that can provide relief.
  • Irritable Bowel Symdrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), as this eMedTV Web page explains, is a condition affecting the digestive tract. Although it can't be cured, the symptoms can be managed. Irritable bowel symdrome is a common misspelling of irritable bowel syndrome.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is often characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and other symptoms. This eMedTV Web article further explores this chronic condition, including causes, possible signs and symptoms, prognosis, and treatment options.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children
    As this eMedTV page explains, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can affect anyone, including children. This article takes a closer look at how IBS affects children, including a list of possible symptoms, ways of diagnosing it, and various treatment options.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Symptoms
    The classic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) include stomach pain, constipation, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web resource explores the possible signs and symptoms of IBS, including problems that may occur outside of the digestive system.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Causes
    The exact cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is currently unknown. This eMedTV Web segment takes an in-depth look at the research that has been done on IBS, including a list of facts that researchers do know about this digestive condition.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Complications
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) does not permanently harm the intestines. This eMedTV resource explains why irritable bowel syndrome generally doesn't lead to serious complications, and discusses the research behind this topic.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Diet
    If you have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), you may want to avoid dairy products. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at how your diet affects your IBS symptoms, including details on the foods that may worsen symptoms.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Information
    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can cause abdominal (stomach) pain, constipation, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on irritable bowel syndrome, including possible symptoms, treatment options, and prognosis.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome Treatment
    Dietary changes and stress reduction are usually recommended to treat irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This eMedTV resource explains the trial-and-error process of treating IBS and lists other options, such as medications, that can help improve symptoms.
  • Irritant Contact Dermatitis
    Irritant contact dermatitis is a condition that can occur when skin is exposed to an irritating substance. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at this skin condition, noting in particular its causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Is a Staph Infection Contagious?
    Many people wonder if a staph infection is contagious. This eMedTV Web article provides the answer to that question by taking an in-depth look at the ways Staphylococcus bacteria can be spread. This article also lists factors that increase your risk.
  • Is Afrin Addictive?
    It is possible to become addicted to Afrin if you use the nasal spray for more than three days. This eMedTV resource further addresses the question, "Is Afrin addictive?" This page also discusses tips on how to stop using this medication.
  • Is Anthrax Contagious?
    Many people wonder, "Is anthrax contagious?" As explained in this segment of the eMedTV website, anthrax is not contagious. This article takes an in-depth look at how anthrax is transmitted -- either from animals or as the result of a bioterrorism.
  • Is Baclofen a Narcotic?
    This eMedTV page explains that although baclofen is not a narcotic and is not addictive, it can cause severe withdrawal symptoms if it is stopped abruptly. This article further addresses whether baclofen is a narcotic and explains how the drug works.
  • Is Bell's Palsy Contagious?
    If someone you know has Bell's palsy, you might wonder, "Is it contagious?" As this article from the eMedTV Web site points out, the condition is not contagious; that is, you cannot catch it from another person.
  • Is Cialis Better than Viagra (and Vice Versa)?
    As this eMedTV page explains, comparing ED drugs can be difficult, leading many people to wonder if Cialis is better than Viagra (and vice versa). This segment lists the similarities and differences between the two and provides a link to more details.
  • Is Claritin Safe?
    Many people want to know if Claritin is safe. As this eMedTV page explains, Claritin is a popular over-the-counter allergy medication that is generally considered safe. As with any drug, however, side effects are possible.
  • Is Conjugated Linoleic Acid Safe?
    Conjugated linoleic acid may cause problems for people who have diabetes or heart disease. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers other safety precautions and warnings with conjugated linoleic acid, including a list of who should not take the drug.
  • Is Darvocet a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV page explains, Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) is a narcotic drug and is classified as a controlled substance. Although it is far less potent than most narcotics, it should not be viewed as a harmless drug.
  • Is Diphenhydramine Addictive?
    This eMedTV Web page addresses the question, "Is diphenhydramine addictive?" As this article explains, the drug is not usually addicting. However, people may sometimes become dependent on the medication in order to fall asleep.
  • Is Fish Oil Harmful?
    Fish oil, as this eMedTV page explains, may suppress the immune system and can cause high blood sugar levels. This page answers the question, "Is fish oil harmful?" and describes other important precautions, including who should not use the supplement.
  • Is Generic Cialis Safe?
    Although you may find "generic Cialis" on the Internet, these products are not safe. This selection from the eMedTV archives explains why, briefly discusses when a safe generic Cialis may be available, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Is Generic Levitra Safe?
    It is important to understand that any product claiming to be "generic Levitra" is not safe. This page of the eMedTV archives explains why, advises continuing standard ED treatment as your doctor recommends, and links to more information on Levitra.
  • Is Generic Viagra Safe?
    This eMedTV page explains that just because a company claims to sell "generic Viagra," it does not mean these drugs are safe. This article discusses why these products may be dangerous and briefly talks about when a safe generic Viagra may be available.
  • Is Guarana Safe?
    No studies have been performed and published on the effectiveness or safety of guarana. This eMedTV article further answers the question "Is guarana safe?" and lists precautions and warnings to be aware of before taking the herbal supplement.
  • Is Hepatitis C Contagious?
    Is hepatitis C contagious? Yes, hepatitis C is contagious; it is most often spread through contact with infected blood. This eMedTV resource explains how hepatitis C is contagious and gives tips to avoid spreading the virus that causes the disease.
  • Is Horny Goat Weed Legitimate?
    Many people wonder if horny goat weed is legitimate. As this eMedTV page explains, horny goat weed is claimed to be helpful for numerous conditions, including impotence and osteoporosis. However, much more evidence is needed to confirm these findings.
  • Is Hydrocodone Addictive?
    This eMedTV page addresses the question "Is hydrocodone addictive?" As this article explains, hydrocodone has significant abuse and addiction potential. Hydrocodone addiction is common because the drug is readily available and fairly inexpensive.
  • Is Imitrex Safe During Pregnancy?
    This eMedTV segment talks about the safety of taking Imitrex during pregnancy, including the FDA's official recommendation. This page also stresses the importance of talking to your doctor about taking Imitrex in your particular situation.
  • Is Impetigo Contagious?
    As this eMedTV resource explains, people can transmit impetigo to other people through skin-to-skin contact or by coming into contact with a contaminated surface. This page describes the factors that may increase your risk of this contagious infection.
  • Is Interstitial Cystitis Transmitted?
    This eMedTV resource explains why interstitial cystitis is not transmitted. Rather, the bladder condition may be caused by an autoimmune disease, genetics, or irritating substances in the urine.
  • Is It a Sore Throat or Strep?
    There are several differences in the symptoms of viral and bacterial throat infections. This eMedTV Web resource lists the symptoms of each type of infection, and explains how to know if you have a viral sore throat or strep throat.
  • Is It Safe to Drink Hydrogen Peroxide?
    When used to clean wounds, hydrogen peroxide is probably safe in many situations. But is it safe to drink? This eMedTV page describes why some people choose to drink hydrogen peroxide and explains why it is so dangerous to do so.
  • Is Leprosy Contagious?
    Evidence indicates that leprosy is contagious only when a person has not received treatment. As this eMedTV segment explains, once treatment has begun, a person shortly becomes noninfectious. This article also includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Is Mercer Contagious?
    The infectious condition MRSA is contagious; however, as this eMedTV article explains, people in certain situations are more likely to develop the disease than others. "Is Mercer contagious" is a common misspelling of "is MRSA contagious."
  • Is MiraLAX Addictive?
    Although MiraLAX is not addictive, using it for a long time could cause an electrolyte imbalance. This eMedTV segment explains other problems this medication may cause and why you should not take MiraLAX for more than seven days.
  • Is MRSA Contagious? Review
    Many people may wonder, "Is MRSA contagious?" This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that MRSA is contagious and may affect anyone. This page also discusses how MRSA is spread and who is at a higher risk of transmitting this type of infection.
  • Is My Baby Teething?
    When parents hear their babies cry excessively, they may wonder, "Is my baby teething?" As this eMedTV article explains, some of the possible signs and symptoms of teething include night wakening, hardening of the lower gum line, and hand biting.
  • Is Oxycodone the Same as Oxycontin
    Some people may wonder, "Is OxyContin the same as oxycodone?" This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at how oxycodone is the active ingredient in OxyContin and may also be considered a generic version of the drug.
  • Is Pharyngitis Contagious?
    It is possible to spread pharyngitis (a sore throat) to other people. This eMedTV Web segment addresses the question, "Is pharyngitis contagious?" This article also describes some of the potential causes for this type of throat infection.
  • Is Phenergan Safe During Pregnancy?
    As this eMedTV page explains, while Phenergan is approved to be used during labor, there is some evidence that it may increase the risk of breathing problems in newborns. Other risks Phenergan presents during pregnancy also are explored in this article.
  • Is Pneumonia Contagious?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people with pneumonia are most contagious when their symptoms are the most severe -- typically around day two to day four. This article talks more about how pneumonia is spread, with some helpful information on prevention.
  • Is Prednisone a Controlled Substance?
    As this eMedTV page explains, prednisone is a steroid that must be taken carefully to reduce the risk of dangerous side effects. Is it a controlled substance? This article answers this question and also provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Is Prevacid Safe During Pregnancy?
    As explained in this section of the eMedTV Web site, there have been no studies of Prevacid and pregnancy in humans; however, studies on animals showed that Prevacid did not cause side effects in the fetus.
  • Is SARS Contagious?
    Is SARS contagious? Yes -- the SARS virus is very contagious. As this eMedTV article explains, it is spread through person-to-person contact, either through the air or by touching a contaminated surface. This segment talks about SARS transmission.
  • Is Senna Safe?
    As this segment from the eMedTV library explains, senna is probably safe for many people when used appropriately. This article also includes other safety information on senna, including warnings on what side effects may occur.
  • Is Shingles Contagious?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, shingles is not contagious. This Web page also discusses how a person with shingles can cause chickenpox in someone who has not had chickenpox or the chickenpox vaccine.
  • Is Strep Throat Contagious?
    As a contagious infection, strep throat is spread through contact with infected fluids. This eMedTV page further describes this type of throat infection, including how the bacteria that cause the infection are transmitted and how long it is contagious.
  • Is the Common Cold Contagious?
    Is the common cold contagious? Yes, it is. However, as this eMedTV article explains, the common cold is not nearly as contagious as other viruses, such as chickenpox or the flu.
  • Is the Plague a Health Problem Today?
    Is the plague a health problem today? Plague still exists in many countries, including the United States. This eMedTV resource offers statistics on the number of plague cases, explains what often causes it, and lists areas where plague has occurred.
  • Is There a Cure for Ebola?
    Wondering about a cure for Ebola? At present, there isn't one. This section of the eMedTV archives discusses supportive care for Ebola, as well as research on a new vaccine that may help to prevent outbreaks in the future.
  • Is There a Cure for Marfan Syndrome?
    Is there a cure for Marfan syndrome? As this eMedTV Web page explains, there is no cure, but there are several different treatment options that can minimize and prevent the complications of this disorder. This page talks about the search for a cure.
  • Is There a Cure for the Bubonic Plague?
    Is there a cure for the bubonic plague? When a person becomes infected, the best cure is early treatment. This eMedTV article discusses antibiotics used to treat the disease and explains preventive measures designed to keep infections from occurring.
  • Is There a Fever With Strep Throat Symptoms
    As this eMedTV article explains, possible symptoms of strep include a sore throat, white patches on the tonsils, and a fever; symptoms of strep throat typically improve within a few days. This page also offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Is Tramadol a Controlled Substance?
    Many people wonder if tramadol is a controlled substance. As this eMedTV segment explains, the answer depends on who you ask. This article talks about how tramadol is classified at the federal level and provides a link to more information.
  • Is Tramadol a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV segment explains, tramadol (Ultram) was once not considered a narcotic, but that has recently changed. This Web page explains why and offers more information on what makes a drug a narcotic.
  • Is Vicodin or Darvocet Stronger?
    Which is stronger, Vicodin or Darvocet? As this eMedTV article explains, Vicodin is generally a stronger painkiller, compared to Darvocet. This article outlines some of the primary differences and similarities between the two pain medications.
  • Is Walking Pneumonia Contagious?
    This eMedTV segment explains that the germs that cause walking pneumonia are contagious, but that doesn't mean that everyone who is exposed to them will come down with the illness. This page also explains how transmission typically occurs.
  • Is Xanax Safe During Pregnancy
    You may be wondering, "Is it safe to take Xanax during pregnancy?" As this section of the eMedTV Web site explains, Xanax is generally considered to be unsafe for pregnant women. Studies have shown that the drug can increase the risk of birth defects.
  • Isatol
    Istalol is a prescription eye drop used to treat high eye pressure and open angle glaucoma in adults. This eMedTV page discusses Istalol, including information on how it works and potential side effects. Isatol is a common misspelling of Istalol.
  • Ischemic Stroke
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, an ischemic stroke is a type of stroke in which oxygen- and nutrient-rich blood cannot reach the brain. This article discusses this type of stroke, including its causes, its symptoms, its diagnosis, and its treatment.
  • Isentress
    Isentress is a prescription drug that is used in combination with other HIV medicines to treat HIV and AIDS. This eMedTV article describes how Isentress works, offers general dosing guidelines, and provides some general precautions for the drug.
  • Isentris
    This eMedTV page explains that Isentress is a prescription drug that may help prevent the HIV virus from multiplying in people who have HIV or AIDS. This page also covers some dosing tips. Isentris is a common misspelling of Isentress.
  • Isentriss
    Isentress is typically prescribed along with other HIV drugs to treat HIV infection and AIDS. This eMedTV article also describes possible side effects (such as headaches, nausea, and fever). Isentriss is a common misspelling of Isentress.
  • Isocarboxazid
    Isocarboxazid is a prescription drug that is used to treat depression. This eMedTV resource explains why this product is usually used as a last resort. This page also describes how it works and provides tips for taking the medicine.
  • Isolated Systolic Hypertension
    If your systolic blood pressure is too high, you have isolated systolic hypertension. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at isolated systolic hypertension -- the most common form of the disease -- including causes, symptoms, and treatment.
  • Isoptin SR
    Isoptin SR is a prescribed medicine that works to lower blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels. This eMedTV resource further discusses this product, including information on possible side effects, general precautions, and dosing guidelines.
  • Isoptin SR Side Effects
    Constipation, dizziness, and nausea are among the most common side effects reported with Isoptin SR. This eMedTV page highlights both common and rare side effects of the drug, and lists the side effects to immediately report to your healthcare provider.
  • Isotretinoin
    Isotretinoin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat severe nodular acne. This eMedTV segment describes the medication in more detail, including information on possible side effects, general precautions, and tips on when and how to take it.
  • Isotretinoin Dosage
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides general isotretinoin dosing guidelines for treating severe nodular acne. This article also offers some tips on when and how to effectively take your isotretinoin dosage.
  • Isradapine
    Isradipine is a prescription drug that is used for treating high blood pressure. This eMedTV article explains how isradipine works and lists possible side effects of the medicine. Isradapine is a common misspelling of isradipine.
  • Isradipine
    Isradipine is a medicine that is available by prescription to treat high blood pressure. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works, provides dosing information for the medicine, and lists possible side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Istalol
    Istalol is a prescription eye drop used to reduce eye pressure in people with certain eye conditions. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, describes possible uses, offers general dosing guidelines, and lists some potential side effects.
  • Istodax
    Istodax is prescribed to treat T-cell lymphoma in people who have already had one form of treatment. This eMedTV Web selection features an overview of important features of this drug, including specific uses, how it is given, side effects, and more.
  • Jakafi
    Jakafi is prescribed to relieve symptoms and reduce spleen size in people with myelofibrosis. This eMedTV article gives an overview of this medicine, including how it works, details on its effectiveness, possible side effects, and more.
  • Jalyn
    Jalyn is a medicine approved for treating an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH). This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this drug, including information on how it works, dosing tips, potential side effects, and more.
  • Jansing
    Ginseng supplements are often used to enhance memory and mental function. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of ginseng and explains what you should be aware of before using this product. Jansing is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Jantoven
    Jantoven is a prescription drug approved for the prevention and treatment of blood clots. This eMedTV Web page describes how the medication works, lists side effects that may occur with treatment, and explains how to ensure a safe treatment process.
  • Janumet
    Janumet is a prescription drug that is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how the medicine works to control blood sugar, describes the effects, and offers tips for when and how to take it.
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