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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Interstitial Cystitis - Janumet and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Interstitial Cystitis to Janumet and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Interstitial Cystitis and Living
    If you have interstitial cystitis, it's important to find coping techniques that work for you. This part of the eMedTV site talks about living with interstitial cystitis, with information on specific ways to cope with this painful condition.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Cure
    Scientists are still looking for an interstitial cystitis cure. In the meantime, as this section of the eMedTV library explains, treatment is focused on relieving the symptoms associated with the condition.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Information
    Interstitial cystitis is a bladder condition that can cause pressure, tenderness, or intense pain. This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on interstitial cystitis, including possible causes and treatment options.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Support
    Interstitial cystitis support groups can offer valuable help for those living with the condition. This eMedTV page describes where to find sources of support, including doctors, social workers, clergy members, or on the Internet or phone.
  • Interstitial Cystitis Surgery
    This eMedTV article describes various surgical techniques used for treating interstitial cystitis. Surgery outcomes are unpredictable; therefore, this should be considered only if pain is disabling and all other treatment options have failed.
  • Intestinal Gas Problems and Symptoms
    Common problems and symptoms associated with intestinal gas are flatulence and abdominal bloating. This eMedTV Web page discusses how intestinal gas problems and symptoms can be similar to those of other diseases, including Crohn's disease.
  • Intestinal Gas Treatment
    Intestinal gas treatment can include medications, dietary changes, and reducing how much air you swallow. This eMedTV Web page highlights these options for intestinal gas treatment and recommends ways to reduce the symptoms.
  • Intestine or Bowel Damage (Laparoscopy For Ectopic Pregnancy Risks)
    This interactive video describes possible bowel damage that may occur with this procedure.
  • Intestine or Bowel Injury -- Abdominal Hysterectomy Risks
    This video describes what bowel or intestinal injuries can occur during an abdominal hysterectomy and how they are treated.
  • Intravenous Acetaminophen
    Intravenous acetaminophen is a medicine prescribed to treat pain and fever. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at this medication, including details on how it works, dosing guidelines, potential side effects, and more.
  • Intravenous Acetaminophen Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that your intravenous acetaminophen dosage will depend on your age, your weight, your current medications, and other factors. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists details on how this drug is given.
  • Introducción
    Esta es la última presentación que verá acerca del transplante de hígado con donante vivo.
  • Introducción - Cirugía de Donación
    Introducción - Cirugía de Donación
  • Introducción - Evaluación
    Las personas deciden donar un órgano por diversas razones.
  • Introduction to Allergies
    This video clip introduces allergies and gives some basic information.
  • Introduction to Hepatitis C
    This interactive video provides an introduction to hepatitis C.
  • Introduction to Hepatitis C Combination Therapy
    This video summary covers the benefits and possible risks of combination therapy.
  • Introduction to High Blood Pressure
    This video clip offers an introduction to high blood pressure.
  • Introduction to High Cholesterol
    This multimedia clip offers an introduction to high cholesterol.
  • Introvale
    The birth control pill Introvale allows women to have a period only four times a year. This segment of the eMedTV archives presents a detailed look at this oral contraceptive, with information on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Introvale Birth Control Information
    This selection from the eMedTV library provides some basic information on the birth control pill Introvale. It explains why it is important to take it every day, lists a few things to discuss with your doctor, and describes possible side effects.
  • Introvale Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, each dose of Introvale must be taken every day and at the same time each day to ensure the medication's effectiveness. This article explains how to start taking Introvale and what to do if you miss any pills.
  • Intuniv and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Intuniv (guanfacine ER) recommends using the drug with caution if you are nursing. This eMedTV article provides more details on breastfeeding and Intuniv, including how the drug may affect a woman's ability to produce breast milk.
  • Intuniv and Pregnancy
    Although the full risks are unknown, Intuniv (guanfacine ER) is probably safe for women who are expecting. This eMedTV Web page discusses pregnancy and Intuniv use in greater detail, including information on how the drug performed in animal studies.
  • Intuniv Dosage
    As this part of the eMedTV site explains, most children start with an Intuniv dosage of 1 mg per day. The child's healthcare provider may gradually increase this amount, if necessary. This article also offers helpful tips on when and how to take Intuniv.
  • Intuniv Drug Interactions
    Blood pressure drugs, alcohol, and Depakote are some of the products that can interact with Intuniv. In this eMedTV selection, other products that can react with Intuniv are listed, as are the potential problems that can occur as a result.
  • Intuniv Medication Information
    A prescription medication, Intuniv is used to treat ADHD in children and adolescents. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Intuniv, discussing the drug's side effects, generic availability, and performance in clinical trials.
  • Intuniv Overdose
    Taking too much Intuniv (guanfacine ER) can result in drowsiness, dizziness, and slow heart rate. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at what happens with an overdose of this drug, including information on symptoms and treatment options.
  • Intuniv Side Effects
    Nausea, headache, and irritability are among the common side effects of Intuniv. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the problems that can occur while taking this drug, including serious side effects that require prompt medical attention.
  • Intuniv Uses
    Intuniv is approved for treating ADHD in children and adolescents. This segment of the eMedTV archives talks about these Intuniv uses, including information on off-label indications and how the medication is not approved for adults.
  • Invega 6 mg Tablets
    Many people being treated for schizophrenia start with 6 mg Invega tablets (one tablet daily). This part of the eMedTV Web site lists the other strengths available for this medication and provides more detailed Invega dosing guidelines.
  • Invega Sustana
    Invega Sustenna can help minimize symptoms in people with schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource takes a look at this prescription medication, including how it works and possible side effects. Invega Sustana is a common misspelling of Invega Sustenna.
  • Invega Sustenna 156 Mg Every 4 Weeks
    This eMedTV article looks at some general dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna, including how it is given every 4 weeks, and when the 156-mg dose is usually started. This page further explores how this medicine is given and provides a link to learn more.
  • Invega Sustenna and Adolescents
    This eMedTV segment explains that using Invega Sustenna for schizophrenia treatment in adolescents is an "off-label" (unapproved) use of the drug. This page describes this use in more detail and links to more information.
  • Invega Sustenna and Delusions
    When used to treat schizophrenia, Invega Sustenna can help reduce delusions and hallucinations. This eMedTV Web page explains how this antipsychotic drug works to minimize symptoms of schizophrenia and provides a link to more details.
  • Invega Sustenna Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, dosing guidelines for Invega Sustenna will be based on how you respond to the medicine and various other factors. This article describes the factors that may affect your dose and explains how this injection is given.
  • Invega Sustenna Injectable
    Available by prescription, Invega Sustenna is an injectable antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at this medicine, including some general dosing instructions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Invega Sustenna Per Day
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Invega Sustenna is not given on a per-day basis; it is typically injected once a month by your healthcare provider. This page provides more details on how it is administered and links to more dosing information.
  • Invega Sustenna Side Effects
    This eMedTV article lists the side effects of Invega Sustenna that occurred during extensive clinical trials on the drug. This page describes common problems, like headaches and insomnia, as well as serious reactions, such as seizures and fever.
  • Invokana 100 Mg Tablet
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended starting dosage for Invokana is a 100-mg tablet taken once daily in the morning before your first meal. This page provides some basic info on Invokana and includes a link to learn more.
  • Invokana 300 Mg
    Your healthcare provider may recommend Invokana 300 mg once daily to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource examines some of the factors that may affect your dosage and outlines some helpful tips for when and how to take this drug.
  • Invokana and Weight Loss
    There are many possible side effects of Invokana, and weight loss is one of them. This eMedTV Web page describes how much weight people lost during Invokana clinical trials. This page also offers a link to other possible side effects.
  • Invokana Diabetes Medication
    Invokana is a medicine prescribed to help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page examines Invokana, including information on how this diabetes medication is taken, safety issues, and its effects on the body.
  • Invokana Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses the factors that your doctor will consider to determine an appropriate Invokana dosage. This article discusses recommended starting amounts, when and how to take the drug, and other helpful dosing tips.
  • Invokana Medication
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may prescribe a medication called Invokana. This eMedTV gives a brief overview of this drug, including dosing guidelines and possible side effects.
  • Invokana Side Affects
    As explained in this eMedTV page, common side effects of Invokana include bladder infections and increased urination. This page gives a brief overview of the drug's side effects. Invokana side affects is a common misspelling of Invokana side effects.
  • Invokanna
    This eMedTV Web selection discusses how the prescription drug Invokana may be beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes in adults. This page also covers dosing and potential side effects. Invokanna is a common misspelling of Invokana.
  • Iphosphamide Side Effects
    If you are using ifosfamide to treat testicular cancer, you may develop reactions like nausea or vomiting. This eMedTV page lists other common and possibly serious problems. Iphosphamide side effects is a common misspelling of ifosfamide side effects.
  • Ipilimimab
    Ipilimumab is a drug used to treat late-stage melanoma skin cancer that has spread to other areas. This eMedTV article describes how this drug is given, covers safety concerns, and lists side effects. Ipilimimab is a common misspelling of ipilimumab.
  • IPOL Vaccine Information
    IPOL is used to provide protection against polio in children and certain adults. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers more information about the IPOL vaccine, including details on how it works and why it is better than the older oral polio vaccine.
  • IPV Information
    Part of a routine childhood vaccination series, IPV is used for preventing polio. This segment from the eMedTV Web site contains more information about IPV, including details on how it works and what brand names are available for this vaccine.
  • Iquix Eye Drops
    This page of the eMedTV site presents a basic overview of Iquix eye drops. It explains what this medication is used for, the typical course of treatment, possible side effects, and more. It also includes a link to more detailed information on the drug.
  • Irenotecan
    Irinotecan is prescribed in the treatment of colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other areas. This eMedTV segment takes a look at this prescription drug, including how it works and dosing guidelines. Irenotecan is a common misspelling of irinotecan.
  • Iressa Cancer Treatment
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, Iressa is prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer in certain people. This article briefly explores this cancer treatment and explains why Iressa is no longer marketed for use in the United States.
  • Iressa Chemotherapy Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Iressa is prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This resource provides more information on this chemotherapy drug, including safety issues associated with Iressa. It also links to more details.
  • Iressa Efficacy
    How effective is Iressa for non-small cell lung cancer? This article from the eMedTV site examines Iressa's efficacy as a chemotherapy treatment and also includes a link to more detailed information on the drug.
  • Irinitican
    As this eMedTV resource explains, adults who have colon or rectal cancer may benefit from irinotecan. This page describes how this drug is given and why it may not be safe for some people. Irinitican is a common misspelling of irinotecan.
  • Irinotecan Brand Name
    As this eMedTV article explains, the brand-name form of irinotecan is sold under the name Camptosar and is available in several strengths. This page explains what this drug is prescribed for, lists available strengths, and links to more details.
  • Irinotecan Chemo Drug
    As a type of chemotherapy drug, irinotecan is approved to treat colon or rectal cancer. This eMedTV resource explains when this drug is prescribed, how it is given, and possible side effects. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Irinotecan Constipation
    Side effects are likely to occur in most people who use irinotecan. Constipation, as explained in this eMedTV Web page, is a common and potentially serious reaction to this chemotherapy drug. A discussion on how to avoid this problem is also included.
  • Irinotecan Dosage
    Each dose of irinotecan is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion by a healthcare provider. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for this chemotherapy drug, including how often the infusion is given and how your dosage is calculated.
  • Irinotecan for Cervical Cancer
    A doctor may prescribe irinotecan for the treatment of cervical cancer. However, as this eMedTV page explains, this is an unapproved, or off-label, use of the drug. This page explains how this drug works and links to more details on other possible uses.
  • Irinotecan Nausea
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, nausea is a common side effect of irinotecan. This page discusses how often this side effect occurred during clinical trials, and explains how your doctor can help minimize this reaction to the chemotherapy drug.
  • Irinotecan Side Effects
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people receiving irinotecan are likely to develop some type of reaction, such as weakness, diarrhea, or hair loss. This page describes other possible irinotecan side effects, including those that require prompt treatment.
  • Irinotecan Skin Rash
    As this eMedTV resource explains, one of the common side effects with irinotecan is a skin rash. This article takes a look at other skin problems to look out for and provides a link to more details on potential side effects.
  • Irinotecan Therapy
    People who have colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other areas may receive irinotecan. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at this form of cancer therapy, including how irinotecan works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Irinotecan Topoisomerase Inhibitor
    A healthcare provider may prescribe irinotecan to help treat colon or rectal cancer. This eMedTV article explains how this type of topoisomerase I inhibitor works and includes a link to more details on this chemotherapy medication.
  • Irinotecan Trade Name
    As explained in this eMedTV article, irinotecan's trade-name is Camptosar. This page takes a closer look at this medication, including its use in treating colon and rectal cancer, as well as available strengths. A link to more details is also included.
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Stress
    As this eMedTV page explains, stress can cause colon spasms, so it is important for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) to learn how to reduce stress. This page covers the link between stress and IBS, and explores stress-reduction techniques.
  • Irunotecan
    Irinotecan is a drug licensed to treat certain types of colon or rectal cancer. This eMedTV Web selection offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Irunotecan is a common misspelling of irinotecan.
  • Is Ambien a Controlled Substance?
    The FDA considers Ambien a Schedule IV controlled substance. This eMedTV page explains that this means the abuse potential this drug presents is low; several refills are allowed on prescriptions; and those prescriptions can be written, phoned, or faxed.
  • Is Benadryl Addictive?
    This eMedTV resource addresses the question, "Is Benadryl addictive?" As this article explains, people taking Benadryl regularly often become tolerant to the effects of the drug, but this does not necessarily mean that they are addicted.
  • Is Buprenorphine a Controlled Substance?
    As a controlled substance, buprenorphine is a medication whose use is strictly regulated. This eMedTV article offers more information on why this drug is sometimes abused and explains what you can do to avoid any problems with dependence.
  • Is Capecitabine a Good Drug to Cure Colorectal Cancer?
    Ever since its introduction, capecitabine has been a preferred drug for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This eMedTV resource talks about the advantages of this drug and addresses the question of whether it can cure colorectal cancer.
  • Is Celebrex an Opiate?
    This selection of the eMedTV library explains that Celebrex is not an opiate. This segment describes the drug class to which Celebrex belongs, briefly explains how it works, addresses why its use should still be limited, and links to more information.
  • Is Delzicol the Same as Asacol?
    This eMedTV resource talks about whether the medication Delzicol is the same as Asacol (an ulcerative colitis medication that has been discontinued). This article takes a look at the similarities and differences between the two drugs.
  • Is Depression Different for Men? What Are the Signs of Depression in Men?
    Although men and women experience the same symptoms of depression, this eMedTV resource explains that they can experience these signs differently. For example, men are more likely to report changes in activity and less likely to seek help.
  • Is DesOwen Available Over-the-Counter?
    As this eMedTV article explains, DesOwen is not available over-the-counter (OTC). This page takes a look at this prescription medication, including what it is used for and why it is not suitable for some people. A link to more details is also included.
  • Is Dextromethorphan Safe During Pregnancy?
    It may not be safe for pregnant women to take dextromethorphan. This eMedTV article explores the safety of this drug, including details on animal and human studies done on this topic. A link to more information is also included.
  • Is Diet Related to Psoriatic Arthritis?
    Although there is no clear link between diet and psoriatic arthritis symptoms, this eMedTV article explains that keeping a food diary and eliminating certain foods can't hurt. It can benefit your overall health and may help you identify "triggers."
  • Is Differin Safe for Pregnant Women?
    When Differin was given to pregnant animals in very high doses, it caused birth defects. This eMedTV page explores whether Differin is safe for pregnant women, explaining the FDA's classification of the drug and when a doctor may prescribe it.
  • Is Drinking Alcohol Okay With Diabetes?
    Although it is okay for many people with diabetes to drink alcohol, this should be done with caution. This eMedTV resource explains why, lists the dangers alcohol can pose to a person's health, and describes precautions to take if you do decide to drink.
  • Is Elidel Safe for Children?
    Adults and children as young as two years old can use Elidel to treat atopic dermatitis. This eMedTV page discusses whether Elidel is safe for use in children and describes dosing instructions for this age group. A link to more details is also included.
  • Is Exercise Good for Chronic Pain?
    Just because you have chronic pain, it doesn't mean you can't (or shouldn't) exercise. This eMedTV resource presents some considerations to keep in mind when it comes to exercise and chronic pain, and suggests discussing the issue with your doctor.
  • Is Fibromyalgia a Disability?
    This eMedTV Web page explains that if your fibromyalgia prevents you from working, you may qualify for disability benefits, provided your situation meets certain criteria. This article addresses this topic with information on possible sources of help.
  • Is Gluten Intolerance Related to Psoriatic Arthritis?
    This eMedTV selection explains that there is no clear relationship between gluten intolerance and psoriatic arthritis. A gluten-free diet may help someone with this condition, but not always. This page describes the results of studies on this topic.
  • Is Invokana Dangerous?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Invokana can cause problems like dehydration and decreased kidney function in certain people, and some people need to avoid it altogether. This article takes a quick look at the potential dangers of Invokana.
  • Is It Adult ADHD or Something Else?
    Diagnosing ADHD is not always easy, as there are no specific tests. In addition, as this eMedTV page explains, it shares symptoms with other conditions. Your doctor will perform a complete evaluation in order to confirm or rule out this diagnosis.
  • Is It Okay to Avoid My Period?
    In some circumstances, it is okay for a woman to avoid a monthly period, although, as this eMedTV page explains, there are some possible disadvantages to this approach. This article explains why the period on birth control pills isn't really a period.
  • Is It Okay to Cut CellCept?
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, it is not okay to cut CellCept, as the tablets and capsules must be swallowed whole. This article offers some more tips on how to safely take this medicine and provides a link to more dosing instructions.
  • Is It Possible for Children to Have High Cholesterol?
    High cholesterol can occur in children as well as adults; however, as this eMedTV resource explains, what is considered a "normal" cholesterol level will vary from child to child, and will depend on things like risk factors and family history.
  • Is It Possible I Have Cervical Cancer If I Just Had a Normal Internal Uterine Ultrasound a Month Ago?
    This eMedTV resource addresses the question of whether you can have cervical cancer despite a normal internal uterine ultrasound that was done a month ago. It also explains why ultrasound isn't used as a screening method for this type of cancer.
  • Is It Possible to Treat ED Without Medication?
    It is possible to treat ED without medication, depending on the cause. This eMedTV article describes the lifestyle changes that can help relieve symptoms of erectile dysfunction and discusses the risks of taking "natural" products.
  • Is It True I May Suffer From Erectile Dysfunction After Radiation Treatment?
    This eMedTV page explains that many men will suffer from erectile dysfunction as a side effect of prostate cancer treatment. This segment takes a quick look at what to expect specifically after radiation treatment.
  • Is It True That Marijuana Can Kill Cancer Cells in People With Leukemia?
    What does the research say about using marijuana to kill cancer cells in people with leukemia? In this eMedTV article, we explore the truth behind the claims and remind readers to consult their doctor before trying to cure their cancer with marijuana.
  • Is Light Therapy Beneficial for Psoriatic Arthritis?
    This eMedTV page explains that although the FDA has not approved light therapy for psoriatic arthritis, early evidence shows this may be a promising treatment option. This page discusses the benefits of light therapy and how it compares to tanning beds.
  • Is Lotronex Back on the Market?
    Although Lotronex was taken off the market in 2000, it is now available through a restricted-use program. This eMedTV segment provides more information on this topic and discusses the potentially dangerous problems that can occur with this drug.
  • Is Lotronex Safe?
    Taking Lotronex may cause serious bowel problems in some people. This eMedTV resource examines when Lotronex may not be safe for use and describes some of the potentially dangerous complications that may occur. It also links to more details.
  • Is Metanx an FDA Approved Drug?
    Because Metanx is a medical food, it is not an FDA-approved drug. This article on the eMedTV site further explains why Metanx does not require FDA approval even though it is only available by prescription. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Is Mobic a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, Mobic is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Mobic, as this article discusses, works to treat pain and inflammation by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Naltrexone a Narcotic?
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at what naltrexone is used for, whether it is a narcotic, and how it works to help in the treatment of alcohol and opioid dependence. This article also offers a link to more detailed information on this drug.
  • Is Naltrexone Generic?
    It is possible to buy a generic naltrexone product, as explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site. This article examines the available strengths and discusses whether the generic products are as good as the brand-name version of the drug.
  • Is Nasonex an Antihistamine?
    Is Nasonex an antihistamine? As this article from the eMedTV library explains, Nasonex is not an antihistamine. It belongs to a class of drugs called corticosteroids and has many different effects in the body, including anti-inflammatory effects.
  • Is Next Choice the Generic Form of Plan B?
    Original Next Choice is a generic form of the original two-step formulation of Plan B. However, as this eMedTV page explains, a generic version of new Plan B One-Step is also available. A link to more details on this medication is also provided.
  • Is Next Choice the Same as Plan B?
    This article from the eMedTV site explains that original Next Choice is not the same as the new Plan B formulation, but Next Choice ONE DOSE is. This page also offers a link to more information on this topic.
  • Is Nicotrol NS a Prescription?
    This eMedTV segment explains that you need a prescription for Nicotrol NS in order to obtain it. This page also briefly describes how this nicotine replacement medication works, how often it is taken, and possible side effects to be aware of.
  • Is NuLYTELY a Generic?
    There is a generic NuLYTELY product available at this time. This article from the eMedTV Web library provides a brief overview of this generic version of the drug, with information on whether the generic is as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Is Pacerone the Same Thing as Amiodarone?
    As explained in this eMedTV article, amiodarone is the active ingredient in the brand-name drug Pacerone. Amiodarone is also the name of the generic versions of Pacerone. This resource explains the difference between the generic and brand-name drugs.
  • Is Pacerone the Same Thing as Amiodarone?
    Amiodarone is the active ingredient in a few brand-name drugs and is used to treat ventricular arrhythmias. This eMedTV segment examines whether amiodarone is as good as Pacerone and the other brand-name drugs. It also links to more details.
  • Is PROVENGE Successful in Prolonging Life?
    Research has shown that men using PROVENGE for prostate cancer may live longer than men not using the drug. This eMedTV page explores whether PROVENGE is successful in prolonging life in men with prostate cancer and offers a link to more details.
  • Is Relafen a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Relafen is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Relafen, as this article discusses, works to treat arthritis symptoms by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Sinupret Safe?
    This eMedTV segment addresses the question, "Is Sinupret safe?" As this page explains, Sinupret appears to be relatively safe for most people. This article describes the theoretical problems that may occur with this product and offers general warnings.
  • Is Solodyn an Antibiotic?
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Solodyn is an antibiotic that is effective against the bacteria responsible for acne. This segment provides a brief overview of this product, describing how it works and what to tell the doctor prescribing it.
  • Is the Inability to Sustain an Erection Permanent?
    Some men may worry that an inability to sustain an erection could be permanent. This page of the eMedTV library explains why the problem is usually temporary and describes the various ways in which it can be treated, ranging from drugs to devices.
  • Is There a Cure for Diabetes?
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is a cure of sorts for type 1 diabetes, but people still need to take medication for the rest of their lives. This article also discusses how people with type 2 diabetes can successfully manage this condition.
  • Is There a Cure for Erectile Dysfunction?
    Technically, there is no "cure" for erectile dysfunction. However, as this eMedTV Web page explains, depending on the cause, treatment can help relieve symptoms, so in that sense it is a cure; however, the treatment may need to be ongoing.
  • Is There a Generic Ciprodex Otic?
    At this time, there is no generic Ciprodex otic suspension available. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains why there is not a generic version of this ear drop available and discusses when a generic product might be manufactured.
  • Is There a Generic for Amiodarone?
    As this eMedTV selection explains, amiodarone is available as a generic medication. This page explores whether these generic products are as good as the brand-name drugs. It also links to more details on amiodarone's generic availability.
  • Is There a Generic for Plavix?
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains if there is a generic form of Plavix available. This article looks at when a generic version is expected and provides a link to more in-depth information on the topic.
  • Is There a Link Between Adult ADHD and Food Additives and Pesticides?
    There is no definitive research linking ADHD with exposure to additives or pesticides. However, as this eMedTV article explains, these substances may have made symptoms worse in certain children, so adults with ADHD may want to avoid them if possible.
  • Is There a Link Between Antiperspirants and Cancer?
    You may have heard about scientific studies that link cancer to antiperspirant use. What's the real deal? This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at the results of these studies, explaining if there is truly a link between antiperspirants and cancer.
  • Is There a Relationship Between Psoriatic Arthritis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease?
    There is no clear link between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, this eMedTV page explains why the two might appear together since both are autoimmune conditions. The drugs used for psoriatic arthritis might also be responsible.
  • Is There an Inhaled Version of Insulin?
    An inhaled version of insulin used to be available, but has since been removed from the market. This eMedTV segment explains in detail the reasons why this occurred and offers assurance for those who are reluctant to use needles.
  • Is There Any Help to Pay for Cancer Treatment?
    Worried about the cost of cancer treatment? This eMedTV article is for you. It takes a quick look at the options available to help pay for your cancer treatment, including details on who to talk to about your situation.
  • Is There Assistance for Fibromyalgia Medications?
    You may be able to find an assistance program that helps you afford your fibromyalgia medications. This eMedTV article explains that certain criteria may apply and lists other possible sources of support, including your healthcare provider.
  • Is Toradol a Narcotic?
    As this eMedTV selection explains, Toradol is a type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), rather than a narcotic. Toradol, as this article explains, works to treat moderate-to-severe pain by blocking certain hormones in the body.
  • Is Treatment for Hepatitis C Successful?
    As this eMedTV page explains, in general, hepatitis C treatment is successful in removing the virus from the bloodstream. However, this is not true for everyone, and it depends on several factors, one of which is how well you follow your treatment plan.
  • Is Ultram a Controlled Substance?
    Although it is an opioid medication, Ultram is not technically classified as a controlled substance. This eMedTV resource explains why this is so and talks about the possibility of it being listed as a controlled substance in the future.
  • Is Velcade a Cancer Treatment Drug?
    As examined in this eMedTV resource, Velcade is a type of cancer drug used for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma and multiple myeloma in adults. This page explains how this drug works and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Is Xylitol Safe?
    Many people may wonder if xylitol is safe when used medicinally. This article from the eMedTV archives offers general warnings and precautions with xylitol and includes important information on who should not use this product.
  • Isodax
    Istodax is a medication licensed to treat certain forms of T-cell lymphoma. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Isodax is a common misspelling of Istodax.
  • Isotretinoin for Acne
    Some cases of nodular acne are severe enough to require treatment with isotretinoin. This eMedTV segment tells you what you need to know about when this prescription medication is called for and includes a link to more information.
  • Isotretinoine
    Isotretinoin is a prescription drug licensed to treat severe nodular acne. This eMedTV Web resource offers a brief look at isotretinoin, including possible side effects and general precautions. Isotretinoine is a common misspelling of isotretinoin.
  • IUD Removal and Pregnancy
    Can the intrauterine device (IUD) be removed if a woman wants to become pregnant? As this eMedTV page explains, the answer is yes. This segment also discusses how soon after IUD removal contraception could occur.
  • IV Busulfex
    Given as an intravenous injection (by IV), Busulfex is used to prepare the body for a stem cell transplant. This eMedTV page explains when this drug is prescribed, how it is given, and possible side effects. It also links to more details.
  • IV Dantrolene Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, dantrolene dosing guidelines will vary, depending on how you respond to the medicine and various other factors. This page lists the factors that may affect your dosage and further explores dantrolene IV and capsules.
  • Ivacaftor
    Ivacaftor is prescribed for people who have certain types of cystic fibrosis gene mutation. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at various topics on this drug, including details on how it works, possible side effects, safety issues, and more.
  • Janavia
    Januvia is a prescription drug approved for treating type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article describes how Januvia works and explains what you should talk to your doctor about before starting this medication. Janavia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Janeva
    Januvia is a medication often prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at Januvia and its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects. Janeva is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Janovia
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor may prescribe Januvia to help lower your blood sugar. This eMedTV page describes the effects of Januvia and explains what else you can do to lower blood sugar levels. Janovia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
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