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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Glaucoma - Gonorrhea and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Glaucoma to Gonorrhea and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Glucovance Side Effects
    Some common Glucovance side effects include diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some more serious side effects of the drug, such as chest pain and signs of an allergic reaction or lactic acidosis.
  • Glucovance Uses
    This page on the eMedTV site explains that Glucovance is used to treat type 2 diabetes, but is not effective at treating type 1 diabetes. The drug is not recommended for use in children, and there are no universally accepted off-label Glucovance uses.
  • Glucovance Warnings and Precautions
    This page on the eMedTV Web site examines a number of Glucovance warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions and the risk of low blood sugar in some people taking this drug. This page also discusses who should not take Glucovance.
  • Glumetza Dosing
    The suggested Glumetza dose for those who are first starting treatment is 1000 mg once daily. This eMedTV article also offers Glumetza dosing recommendations for those who are taking insulin and lists tips and precautions for taking the medicine.
  • Glumetza Information
    This eMedTV resource provides some important information on Glumetza, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This page briefly explains what sets Glumetza apart from other long-acting forms of metformin and gives some basic dosing guidelines.
  • Glutamine and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered a good idea to avoid glutamine (L-glutamine) supplements while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at glutamine and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug is safe for breastfeeding women.
  • Glutamine and Pregnancy
    Glutamine (L-glutamine) supplements may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV site provides more information on glutamine and pregnancy, and explains why dietary supplements may not be safe for pregnant women.
  • Glutamine Dosage
    A standard glutamine dosage has not been established yet. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses glutamine dosing in more detail and offers information on how to best determine a safe and effective glutamine dosage.
  • Glutamine Drug Interactions
    Lactulose, seizure medications, and chemotherapy medicines may cause negative glutamine drug interactions. This eMedTV article further explains what may happen when these products interact with glutamine supplementation.
  • Glutamine Overdose
    It is currently not known exactly what to expect with a glutamine (L-glutamine) overdose. This eMedTV Web page explores some of the potential effects of a glutamine overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Glutathione and Breastfeeding
    It is currently not known whether it is safe to breastfeed while taking glutathione. This eMedTV segment provides more information on glutathione and breastfeeding, and explains whether the supplement is likely to cause problems in a nursing infant.
  • Glutathione Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that there are no clearly established glutathione dosage guidelines because this supplement is not closely regulated. This page discusses some general glutathione dosing guidelines and offers tips for taking the supplement.
  • Glutathione Drug Interactions
    Glutathione can interact with alcohol and acetaminophen. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains how these glutathione drug interactions can potentially counteract the benefits glutathione has on detoxifying certain chemicals in the body.
  • Glutathione Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, the effects of a glutathione overdose will depend on how much was taken and whether it was taken with other substances. This article also describes possible treatment options for a glutathione overdose.
  • Glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase) Medication Information
    This eMedTV article offers basic information on glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), a prescription medication that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article also links to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Glyburide Alternatives
    This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at some of the glyburide alternatives for type 2 diabetes, such as lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications. This page also explains when an alternative to glyburide might be necessary.
  • Glyburide and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV segment explains, low and high blood sugar levels are possible side effects of glyburide. Blood sugar levels that are too high or too low can cause serious complications, so possible symptoms should be reported to your doctor.
  • Glyburide and Diabetes Control
    As explained in this eMedTV page, clinical studies have shown that glyburide can help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article offers more details on controlling diabetes with glyburide and includes a link to more information.
  • Glyburide and Metformin
    Glyburide and metformin is a prescription drug that is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource covers how glyburide and metformin works and when and how to take it, as well as the drug's side effects and dosing guidelines.
  • Glyburide and Metformin Dosing
    This eMedTV Web page explains that for people who aren't taking either glyburide or metformin, glyburide and metformin dosing starts at 1.25 mg/250 mg once daily. This page also lists factors that can affect your dosage and some general dosing tips.
  • Glyburide and Metformin Info
    This eMedTV article can be a helpful resource for people looking for info on glyburide and metformin. It describes how this drug should be taken and what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and includes a link to more information.
  • Glyburide and Metformin Side Affects
    This eMedTV page explains that there are possible side effects of glyburide and metformin, such as diarrhea, dizziness, and nausea. Glyburide and metformin side affects is a common misspelling and variation of side effects of glyburide and metformin.
  • Glyburide Dangers
    You may not be able to use glyburide safely if you have liver problems or certain other medical conditions. This eMedTV selection discusses other potential glyburide dangers to be aware of and covers possible side effects, both common and serious.
  • Glyburide Diabetes Medicine
    As a prescription type 2 diabetes medicine, glyburide helps lower blood sugar. This eMedTV Web resource provides important information on this oral medication, including how it works and side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Glyburide Diabetic Drug Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend a medication called glyburide. This eMedTV page offers more information on this oral diabetic drug, explaining what to discuss with your doctor before taking it.
  • Glyburide Drug Interactions
    This page of the eMedTV library explores potential glyburide drug interactions with other medications, such as thyroid medications, diuretics, and oral contraceptives. This page also explains how these interactions can potentially lead to problems.
  • Glyburide Medicine for Type 2 Diabetes
    Glyburide is a prescription medicine used in people with type 2 diabetes to control blood sugar. This eMedTV article explains why the drug is not used for type 1 diabetes and provides a link to more information on its uses, side effects, and more.
  • Glyburide Overdose
    While uncommon, there are cases of people taking too much glyburide. This eMedTV article describes glyburide overdose symptoms, such as dizziness, difficulty speaking, and blurry vision. This page also lists treatment options for a recent overdose.
  • Glyburide Problems
    As this eMedTV article explains, glyburide can cause nausea, heartburn, and other side effects, but it is generally well tolerated. This resource lists other problems that can occur with glyburide and provides links to more detailed information.
  • Glyburide Risks
    As this eMedTV page explains, a person taking glyburide has a higher chance of nausea and other stomach problems than someone not taking it. This article lists some of the other risks associated with glyburide and provides a link to more information.
  • Glyburide Strengths
    As explained in this eMedTV article, the diabetes drug glyburide comes in a number of strengths, ranging from 1.25 mg to 6 mg. This resource lists all of the currently available strengths and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Glyburide Substitutes
    In certain situations, you may require an alternative to glyburide. This eMedTV Web page explains when a doctor may recommend a glyburide substitute and discusses some of these other medicines and lifestyle changes that can be used for type 1 diabetes.
  • Glyburide to Lower Blood Sugar
    If you have type 2 diabetes, glyburide could help you lower your blood sugar. This eMedTV article takes a quick look at how you can control your blood sugar with this medication and explains how it is taken. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Glyburide Uses
    This eMedTV resource explores various glyburide uses, such as treating people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes (an off-label use). This page also explains how glyburide works to increase insulin production and improve insulin resistance.
  • Glyburide Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article describes various glyburide warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions and an increased risk of death for those with heart or blood vessel problems. This page also lists people who should avoid the drug.
  • Glycine and Breastfeeding
    It is probably wise to avoid glycine supplements while breastfeeding. This eMedTV page talks about glycine and breastfeeding, explaining why it is important to discuss the risks and benefits with your healthcare provider if you are nursing.
  • Glycine and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web article explains why glycine and pregnancy may not be a safe combination. This page also discusses why it is typically recommended that pregnant women avoid glycine supplements and explains why this "natural" product may not be safe.
  • Glycine Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that if you choose to take glycine supplements, it's probably a good idea to follow the dosing directions on the product label. This page also offers tips on taking your glycine dosage safely and finding a reputable product.
  • Glycine Drug Interactions
    Do not combine glycine with atypical antipsychotics without your doctor's approval and supervision. This eMedTV resource explains how these medications may cause glycine drug interactions and can decrease the effectiveness of the antipsychotics.
  • Glycine Overdose
    If you believe that you have taken too much glycine, seek immediate medical attention. This eMedTV page explains that although it isn't exactly known what to expect from a glycine overdose, treatment would probably involve supportive care.
  • Glycine Side Effects
    Glycine can cause side effects even though it is a "natural" product. This selection from the eMedTV Web site lists some of commonly reported glycine side effects, as well as potentially serious side effects that may require immediate medical care.
  • GlycoLax and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if GlycoLax passes through breast milk. This page from the eMedTV Web archives explains why no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding and using GlycoLax, and why it's unlikely that it would cause problems.
  • GlycoLax and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use GlycoLax when pregnant. This selection from the eMedTV Web site further explains why the FDA has classified this laxative as a pregnancy Category C medication and discusses when a doctor may recommend using GlycoLax.
  • GlycoLax Dosage
    The usual GlycoLax dosage for treating constipation is 17 grams of powder dissolved in liquid once daily. This eMedTV page further describes specific dosing guidelines for using this laxative, with important tips on when and how to take GlycoLax.
  • GlycoLax Drug Interactions
    Currently, there are no known GlycoLax drug interactions. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, it is possible that not all interactions are known at this time, so tell your doctor about all medications you are taking before using this laxative.
  • GlycoLax Medication Information
    As a laxative, GlycoLax can help relieve constipation. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on this medication, including how to use it, possible side effects, and who may not be able to safely take this laxative.
  • GlycoLax Overdose
    If you take too much GlycoLax, you may have diarrhea and possibly dehydration. This eMedTV Web resource describes what to expect with an overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider may treat any problems that occur.
  • GlycoLax Side Effects
    Nausea, gas, and diarrhea are some of the potential side effects of GlycoLax. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects of the product and also explains which problems are potentially serious and require immediate medical attention.
  • GlycoLax Uses
    GlycoLax is a nonprescription laxative approved to help relieve constipation. This eMedTV page further describes uses for GlycoLax, including possible "off-label" (unapproved) reasons to use this medicine and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • GlycoLax Warnings and Precautions
    If you have a history of a bowel obstruction, you may not be able to safely use GlycoLax. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at other important precautions and warnings for GlycoLax, including information on who should not use this laxative.
  • Glynase Drug Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, Glynase can help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This segment discusses possible side effects, how the medication works, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Go for a Walk
    When you're caring for a loved one with cancer, sometimes, the seasons simply pass by without your notice. Take time to reconnect with the physical world around you with a walk. The fresh air, exercise, and connection with nature will help clear your thoughts, put things in perspective, and recharge your body and mind.
  • Go Nuts for Nuts
    Actually, don't really go nuts. Moderation and portion control are key here, as nuts are high in calories. If you're on a sodium-restricted diet, be sure to choose an unsalted variety, too. While the merits of individual nuts can be debated, we like using a variety of different nuts to provide a variety of different tastes, textures, and nutritional profiles.
  • Go Shopping
    If you love to shop, stop by your favorite stores for a few minutes (or a few hours, if time allows). Even if you don't spend a penny, shopping can be very therapeutic. What if you're not a big shopper? Even just grocery shopping can help you get out of the house for a bit.
  • Goji and Breastfeeding
    It is currently not clear whether goji is safe for breastfeeding women. This page on the eMedTV site offers a more in-depth look at goji and breastfeeding, and weighs some of the benefits and possible risks of using these products while nursing.
  • Goji and Pregnancy
    It is currently not known whether goji products are safe for using during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on goji and pregnancy, and lists some of the possible benefits and risks of using the product while pregnant.
  • Goji Dosage
    A safe and effective goji dosage has not been established at this time. This eMedTV page explains why it is difficult to determine a consistently safe and effective dose, and offers tips on finding a reliable product from a trustworthy manufacturer.
  • Goji Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, blood pressure medications, and diabetes medicines may cause goji drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, these drug interactions could increase the risk of bleeding, low blood sugar, and low blood pressure.
  • Goji Overdose
    It is not known what to expect from a goji overdose, or even if an overdose is possible. This part of the eMedTV library explores the possible symptoms of an overdose and explains what treatment options would be available.
  • Goji Side Effects
    At this time, there are no known goji side effects. As this eMedTV Web page explains, taking goji with the "blood thinner" warfarin may increase the risk of bleeding, but this may actually be a drug interaction rather than a true side effect.
  • Goldenseal and Breastfeeding
    In general, goldenseal is not considered to be safe for use while breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and goldenseal, and further explains why this supplement may not be a good choice for nursing women.
  • Goldenseal and Pregnancy
    Generally, goldenseal is not considered to be safe for use during pregnancy. This page from the eMedTV archives provides more information about pregnancy and goldenseal, and explains what problems may occur if a pregnant woman takes this supplement.
  • Goldenseal Dosage
    There is no standard recommended dosage for goldenseal. As this eMedTV article explains, this is because different goldenseal products may contain a different amount of the active ingredient, making consistently safe and effective dosing difficult.
  • Goldenseal Drug Interactions
    Little definitive information is available about drug interactions with goldenseal. As this eMedTV page explains, early research suggests that goldenseal may affect certain liver enzymes that are responsible for breaking down many different medications.
  • Goldenseal Overdose
    It is not clear if an overdose of goldenseal is possible (or how much of it would result in an overdose). This eMedTV resource explores the possible effects of an overdose with this supplement and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Goldenseal Supplement Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation discusses the supplement goldenseal. Information included in this article includes why some people take it, as well as possible side effects. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Golimumab Dosage
    Golimumab is typically injected once a month. This eMedTV page discusses the dosing guidelines for this medication in more detail, explaining where the injections should be given and who may administer them.
  • Golimumab Drug Information
    Golimumab is a medication used to treat ankylosing spondylitis and certain other conditions. This part of the eMedTV site provides some basic drug information on golimumab, such as common side effects. A link to a full-length article is also provided.
  • Golitly
    Typically, preparing for a colonoscopy will involve taking a laxative such as GoLYTELY. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about this product and provides a link to more information. Golitly is a common misspelling of GoLYTELY.
  • GoLYTELY and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV selection talks about the issues surrounding breastfeeding and GoLYTELY. This article explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk and tells you why it's important to consult your healthcare provider.
  • GoLYTELY and Pregnancy
    It is unknown if GoLYTELY (polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution) is completely safe during pregnancy. As this eMedTV page explains, however, problems seem unlikely, as the medication is not expected to be absorbed into the blood.
  • Golytely Bowel Prep
    This video segment discusses Golytely -- a common prescription medicine that is given prior to this procedure.
  • Golytely Bowel Prep -- Summary
    This video explains the importance of doing your bowel prep before your colonoscopy.
  • GoLYTELY Dosage
    This part of the eMedTV Web site offers several tips and dosing guidelines on how GoLYTELY should be taken. This includes how much needs to be consumed, how long it usually takes for the laxative to start working, and more.
  • GoLYTELY Drug Interactions
    If you are taking GoLYTELY, other medications should be avoided in the hour before starting this laxative. This eMedTV resource gives an overview of interactions between GoLYTELY and other drugs, explaining how you can reduce your risk of problems.
  • GoLYTELY Medication Information
    GoLYTELY is taken in order to cleanse the bowels before a colonoscopy or certain other procedures. This eMedTV segment offers more information on GoLYTELY, including basic dosing guidelines for the medication, side effects, and warnings.
  • GoLYTELY Overdose
    If you drink too much GoLYTELY, symptoms may include nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page lists other likely symptoms of an overdose with this laxative and explains what treatment options are available if a person overdoses on GoLYTELY.
  • GoLYTELY Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, GoLYTELY is used to cleanse the bowels in preparation for a colonoscopy or barium enema exam. This article discusses how the laxative works and explains why it is important to empty the bowel before these procedures.
  • GoLYTELY Warnings and Precautions
    People with a hole or blockage in the intestines should not use GoLYTELY. This eMedTV article outlines important warnings and precautions with GoLYTELY, including what your doctor needs to know and what to expect while taking it.
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