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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Generic Zovirax Ointment - Glare and Halos After LASIK

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Zovirax Ointment to Glare and Halos After LASIK. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Zovirax Ointment
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, generic Zovirax ointment (acyclovir ointment) is available in one strength. This article takes a closer look at the generic version, including who makes it and whether it is as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Zyban
    This portion of the eMedTV archives provides an overview of generic Zyban, which is manufactured by Teva Pharmaceuticals and Sandoz Pharmaceuticals and is available in one strength (150 mg tablets).
  • Generic Zyclara
    At this time, no generic Zyclara products are available, as the drug is protected by a patent. This eMedTV Web selection discusses when this patent expires and when a generic version of the drug might become available.
  • Generic Zydone
    This segment from the eMedTV archives takes a look at generic Zydone. It explains why no generic versions of the drug are currently available, explores if they ever will be, and compares Zydone to generic hydrocodone/APAP.
  • Generic Zyflo
    Generic Zyflo is not yet available on the market. This section of the eMedTV Web site explains why this could be, and includes details on when a generic version could become available. This article also looks at zileuton, the drug's active ingredient.
  • Generic Zyflo CR
    Although the drug's patents have expired, Zyflo CR (zileuton CR) is still not available in generic form. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this topic and talks about how zileuton compares to Zyflo CR.
  • Generic Zyloprim
    Zyloprim (allopurinol) is available in generic form. This eMedTV page explains how the FDA has determined that generic Zyloprim is equivalent to the brand-name drug. This page also lists the available strengths and manufacturers of this generic drug.
  • Generic Zymar
    This eMedTV Web article explains why a generic version of Zymar (gatifloxacin) is currently unavailable and when such a product might be expected. It also addresses the difference between the terms "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Zymaxid
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Zymaxid (gatifloxacin) is considered equivalent to the brand-name version of the drug. This article takes a closer look at the generic version, including who makes it, the strength in which it is sold, and more.
  • Generic Zyprexa
    The patent for Zyprexa (olanzapine) has expired, and generic versions are now available. This eMedTV selection takes an in-depth look at these generic versions, with information on how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Zyprexa Relprevv
    There is currently no generic version of Zyprexa Relprevv (olanzapine extended-release injection). This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at why this is the case, and also explains whether a company might make a generic version someday.
  • Generic Zyrtec Eye Drops
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, generic versions of Zyrtec Eye Drops (ketotifen ophthalmic solution) are available. This article takes a look at these products, explaining who makes them and listing similar brand-name products.
  • Generic Zytiga
    There are currently no generic Zytiga (abiraterone) products available. This eMedTV Web resource discusses when a generic product might be manufactured, and explains that abiraterone is the generic name and not a generic version of Zytiga.
  • Generic Zyvox
    As this page from the eMedTV site explains, no generic Zyvox products are available at this time. This article looks at the possibility of a generic version and explains why it's hard to predict when a generic Zyvox could appear on the market.
  • Genes and Epilepsy
    Scientists studying genes and epilepsy found at least twelve forms of epilepsy to have some genetic basis. This eMedTV article explores the latest research into genes and epilepsy, including the development of more effective anticonvulsant treatment.
  • Genetal Worts
    This part of the eMedTV library explains that genital warts are a common sexually transmitted disease. This article also describes how to identify genital warts and covers some treatment options. Genetal worts is a common misspelling of genital warts.
  • Genetic Test Prior to Starting Irinotecan
    You may need to take a genetic test prior to starting irinotecan treatment to help avoid serious problems. This eMedTV page explains how this test can help your doctor determine an appropriate dosage that will minimize serious side effects of irinotecan.
  • Genetics of Huntington's Disease
    Huntington's disease is the result of a genetic mutation in chromosome number four. This eMedTV segment takes a look at the genetics of Huntington's disease and explains how the condition is inherited.
  • Gengraf 100 Mg
    Various forms and strengths of Gengraf are available, including 100-mg capsules. This eMedTV resource lists the different formulations that can be prescribed, briefly describes conditions this drug can treat, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Gengraf and Breastfeeding
    This segment of the eMedTV archives takes a look at the possible risks when a woman who is breastfeeding uses Gengraf. It includes the manufacturer's recommendations and lists the possible problems that could occur in the nursing infant.
  • Gengraf and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource describes the circumstances under which a woman who is pregnant may take Gengraf (even though the drug likely presents some risk). The results of giving Gengraf to pregnant animals in research studies are also included.
  • Gengraf and Psoriatic Arthritis
    This eMedTV resource explains that Gengraf is not approved to treat psoriatic arthritis, but healthcare providers can still prescribe it for this use. This article explores the safety and effectiveness of using this drug for psoriatic arthritis.
  • Gengraf Dosage
    Various factors help determine a person's Gengraf dosage, which this eMedTV segment describes in detail. Guidelines for the various Gengraf uses are discussed, as are tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process with this immunosuppressant.
  • Gengraf Drug Information
    This selection of the eMedTV library provides some basic drug information on Gengraf, an immunosuppressant used to prevent organ rejection and treat certain inflammatory conditions. This page includes safety precautions and links to more information.
  • Gengraf Drug Interactions
    Because Gengraf can react with so many drugs, a detailed list of interactions is provided in this eMedTV article. It includes many of the medicines that can interfere with Gengraf, the problems that may result, and how they might be avoided.
  • Gengraf for Psoriasis
    One of the many treatment options for psoriasis is Gengraf, a type of immunosuppressant. This eMedTV article takes a brief look at using this drug for psoriasis, with information on when it is prescribed and why Gengraf is not a cure.
  • Gengraf Generic Medication
    This eMedTV selection explains that the medication Gengraf is a generic version of another brand-name drug. This segment describes how this relates to the original version, provides some basic drug information, and includes a link to more details.
  • Gengraf Overdose
    When a person takes a Gengraf overdose, "pumping the stomach" may be required. This eMedTV article explains that treatment options will depend on how recently the overdose occurred and what symptoms are present, such as tachycardia or kidney problems.
  • Gengraf Side Effects
    This eMedTV Web page explains that in clinical studies, the most commonly reported Gengraf side effects included high blood pressure; tremor; and an overgrowth of coarse, dark facial and body hair. Serious adverse reactions are also listed.
  • Gengraf Uses
    There are two primary uses for Gengraf, which are discussed in detail in this eMedTV resource. The drug can relieve active, severe cases of psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, and can also help prevent rejection after certain organ transplant procedures.
  • Gengraf Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV resource explains that because Gengraf weakens the immune system, you may be more susceptible to infections while on it, including potentially serious infections. Other important Gengraf precautions and warnings are included in this article.
  • Genital Herpes and Breastfeeding
    This portion of the eMedTV archives provides a discussion on genital herpes and breastfeeding. It describes how a nursing woman can keep her baby from coming into contact with the dangerous herpes sores.
  • Genital Herpes Causes
    Genital herpes is caused by either the herpes simplex type 1 or herpes simplex type 2 virus. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses these genital herpes causes in more detail and explains how the virus is transmitted.
  • Genital Warts and Pregnancy
    In most cases, genital warts will not cause problems for the mother or child during pregnancy. This eMedTV page offers more information on genital warts and pregnancy, and explains the potential impact on both the mother and the unborn child.
  • Genital Warts Appearance
    The genital warts appearance is typically soft, moist, flesh-colored bumps on the genitalia. As this eMedTV Web page explains, however, the appearance can vary. These warts can appear in different places and look different from person to person.
  • Genital Warts Diagnosis
    A genital warts diagnosis is usually made by performing a physical exam. This segment of the eMedTV library describes the tests that may be used to diagnose genital warts and lists other conditions that share similar signs or symptoms.
  • Genital Warts Symtoms
    Possible genital warts symptoms include pain, itching, and burning. This page from the eMedTV library lists other possible symptoms and explains where they may appear. Genital warts symtoms is a common misspelling of genital warts symptoms.
  • Genotype 1 and Hepatitis C Treatment
    It's estimated that up to 50 percent of people with genotype 1 HCV will have a successful response to hepatitis C treatment. This eMedTV resource explores how genotype, as well as viral load and levels of liver damage, can impact hepatitis C treatment.
  • Genovia
    Januvia is a prescription medicine licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes Januvia in more detail and explains how the drug works to lower blood sugar. Genovia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Geoden
    Geodon is a prescription medication licensed to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV Web article describes Geodon in more detail and offers some general precautions for taking the drug. Geoden is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Geodon 20 mg Capsules
    People being treated for schizophrenia usually start with Geodon 20 mg capsules (one capsule, twice a day). This eMedTV page also offers Geodon dosing guidelines for treating bipolar disorder and lists the other strengths available for this medicine.
  • Geodon Alternatives
    Therapy and other medications can be used as Geodon alternatives. This eMedTV page provides a list of medication alternatives to Geodon (such as typical antipsychotics and mood stabilizers) and discusses how therapy can be used as a Geodon alternative.
  • Geodon and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Geodon is passed through breast milk during breastfeeding. This eMedTV segment explores Geodon and breastfeeding in detail, noting in particular why it's important to talk to your doctor about your particular situation.
  • Geodon and Dry Mouth
    It is possible to experience a dry mouth while taking Geodon. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Geodon and dry mouth, and provides a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief (such as using a humidifier at night).
  • Geodon and Sex Drive
    Geodon may cause certain sexual side effects, such as impotence and ejaculation problems. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Geodon and sex drive, and explains how common these sexual side effects are with people taking the drug.
  • Geodon Capsules
    Geodon is an atypical antipsychotic medication used for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. As this eMedTV article explains, Geodon capsules are available by prescription only and are taken by mouth, typically twice a day.
  • Geodon Dangers
    Geodon can cause a life-threatening irregular heart rhythm (arrhythmia) called QT prolongation. This eMedTV segment explores other potential Geodon dangers and explains what side effects could potentially occur with this medication.
  • Geodon Drug Interactions
    When drugs like carbamazepine or cisapride are taken with Geodon, drug interactions can potentially occur. This eMedTV page lists other drugs that may lead to Geodon interactions and explains the possible effects of combining these drugs with Geodon.
  • Geodon Drug Side Effects
    Common side effects of Geodon may include nausea, drowsiness, and headaches. This eMedTV article lists other Geodon drug side effects, including rare but possible side effects and potentially serious problems that require medical attention.
  • Geodon for Bipolar Disorder
    Healthcare providers often prescribe the antipsychotic medication Geodon for bipolar disorder treatment. This eMedTV resource describes bipolar disorder in more detail and explains how Geodon works to improve symptoms of the mental illness.
  • Geodon for Children
    Healthcare providers will generally not prescribe Geodon for children. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, the medication has not been approved to treat bipolar disorder in children or childhood schizophrenia.
  • Geodon for Schizophrenia
    Doctors often prescribe the medication Geodon for schizophrenia to help improve symptoms. This page from the eMedTV Web site defines schizophrenia and describes the effects that Geodon may have on people with this mental illness.
  • Geodon Indications
    Geodon is a prescription medication commonly used for treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This eMedTV resource discusses Geodon indications in more detail and lists examples of possible off-label uses for the medication.
  • Geodon Risks
    Geodon could cause tardive dyskinesia, a condition involving uncontrollable body or face movements. This eMedTV article discusses other potential Geodon risks and includes a list of the common side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Geodon Safety
    Before starting Geodon, you should talk to your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV segment contains more Geodon safety information, including a list of potential side effects of the drug and other warnings and precautions.
  • Geodon Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects (such as ejaculation problems or impotence) may occur with the use of Geodon. This eMedTV Web page further discusses Geodon sexual side effects and describes what your doctor may recommend if they do occur.
  • Geodon Substitute
    Many drugs can be used as a Geodon substitute, including other antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. This eMedTV segment describes various alternatives to Geodon and explains how psychosocial treatments can also be helpful.
  • Geodon Uses
    This eMedTV article explains that while Geodon is used mainly to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, there are also some off-label Geodon uses (such as the treatment of Tourette syndrome or behavior problems in elderly people with dementia).
  • Geodon Warnings and Precautions
    Priapism is a rare but possible side effect of Geodon. As this eMedTV segment explains, there are many important Geodon warnings and precautions to be aware of, including other possible side effects that can occur in some people who take the drug.
  • Geodon Weight Change
    During treatment with Geodon, weight change could occur as a side effect. This section of the eMedTV archives explains how common this side effect appears to be and discusses the potential dangers of excessive weight gain.
  • Geodon Withdraw
    If you abruptly stop taking Geodon, withdrawal symptoms could occur. This eMedTV page lists potential withdrawal symptoms and explains how your doctor can help prevent these symptoms. Geodon withdraw is a common misspelling of Geodon withdrawal.
  • Geodon Withdrawal Symptoms
    Potential Geodon withdrawal symptoms include hallucinations, insomnia, and depression. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible withdrawal symptoms and explains what your doctor can do to help prevent severe symptoms from occurring.
  • GERD Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, the process used to make a GERD diagnosis involves a physical exam, asking questions, and possibly performing tests, such as an upper GI or an upper endoscopy. However, a diagnosis can be made based on symptoms alone.
  • GERD Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides information on GERD (gastroesophageal reflux disease). Topics discussed in this article include symptoms and treatment options. Also included is a link to more information.
  • Geriatrics and Digoxin
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, digoxin is approved for use in geriatric cases. However, different dosing guidelines are often used for this age group. This Web resource explains these guidelines and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Gestational Diabets
    Nearly 5 percent of pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at how the condition is diagnosed and also provides a link to more information. Gestational diabets is a common misspelling of gestational diabetes.
  • Gestational Diabities
    Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman's body does not properly convert food into energy. This eMedTV page describes some precautions involving gestational diabetes. Gestational diabities is a common misspelling of gestational diabetes.
  • Gesticare and Breastfeeding
    Gesticare is considered to be safe for nursing women. As this eMedTV article explains, since breastfeeding is a time of increased nutritional need, it is actually recommended that nursing mothers take a prenatal vitamin (such as Gesticare).
  • Gesticare DHA and Breastfeeding
    Gesticare DHA is usually considered safe -- and beneficial -- for breastfeeding women and their infants. This eMedTV Web page offers information on why Gesticare DHA and breastfeeding are compatible and the benefits it can offer for nursing babies.
  • Gesticare DHA Dosage
    There is only one standard dose of Gesticare DHA, regardless of your age or weight. As this eMedTV resource explains, the recommended dosage is one tablet (which contains the vitamins and minerals) and one capsule (which contains the DHA) per day.
  • Gesticare DHA Drug Interactions
    Aspirin, certain antibiotics, and bisphosphonate medicines may cause drug interactions with Gesticare DHA. This eMedTV page explains what may happen if these drugs are taken together and lists other medications that may react with Gesticare DHA.
  • Gesticare DHA Overdose
    A rapid heart rate, seizures, or fluid in the lungs are possible effects of a Gesticare DHA overdose. This eMedTV page lists other possible symptoms and describes the various steps that your doctor may take to treat an overdose of this supplement.
  • Gesticare DHA Prenatal Vitamins
    Omega-3 fatty acids and other vitamins and minerals are contained in Gesticare DHA prenatal vitamins. This eMedTV segment briefly describes how the supplements are taken and includes a link to more information.
  • Gesticare DHA Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Gesticare DHA include heartburn, gas, and nausea. As this eMedTV page explains, these are also symptoms that women can experience during pregnancy, so it can be difficult to tell if they are true side effects of the vitamin.
  • Gesticare DHA Uses
    Nutritional gaps in the diet of pregnant women can often be remedied with Gesticare DHA. This page on the eMedTV site further explores what Gesticare DHA is used for (including possible off-label uses) and describes the various benefits of this vitamin.
  • Gesticare DHA Warnings and Precautions
    If you have anemia, consult your doctor before taking Gesticare DHA. This eMedTV article lists other warnings and precautions with Gesticare DHA, including more information on what you should discuss with your doctor before using this vitamin.
  • Gesticare Drug Interactions
    Numerous medicines may cause drug interactions with Gesticare, including antibiotics and bisphosphonates. As this eMedTV article explains, the minerals in Gesticare may prevent these various medications from being absorbed into the body.
  • Gesticare Overdose
    An overdose of Gesticare can be quite dangerous and may result in iron poisoning. This eMedTV segment lists some of the symptoms of iron poisoning and describes the various treatment options that are available for an overdose of this prenatal vitamin.
  • Gesticare Prenatal Vitamin Information
    Gesticare is a supplement taken by women who are pregnant, breastfeeding, or trying to conceive. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this prenatal vitamin, including some of its safety warnings and side effects.
  • Gesticare Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Gesticare include heartburn or indigestion, fatigue, and insomnia. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to your healthcare provider immediately.
  • Gesticare Uses
    Gesticare is a product that helps fill in nutritional gaps in the diet of pregnant and breastfeeding women. This eMedTV article explains why taking this prenatal vitamin is important and explores possible off-label uses for Gesticare supplements.
  • Gesticare Warnings and Precautions
    If you have anemia, talk to your doctor before taking Gesticare. This eMedTV page further explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this vitamin. Warnings and precautions on who should not use Gesticare are also listed here.
  • Get an Annual Hearing Test
    Don't assume your hearing loss is just a part of aging. Diabetes is also linked to hearing problems. It's not yet clear how or why hearing loss is more common in people with diabetes, but scientists suspect that years of high blood sugar may damage the blood vessels of the ears. An annual hearing exam is probably a good idea for people with diabetes to help identify and deal with hearing loss early.
  • Get Healthy
    If it's good for your body, it will probably help alleviate winter blues. Making a few changes to your diet and adding a bit of exercise to your day can work wonders. However, a drastic dietary change, such as suffering through a restrictive diet during the holidays, can backfire, especially if you fail to keep to the diet. Make small changes that you can live with, and let the benefits start adding up.
  • Get Help
    We've said it before, and we'll say it again: treatment is vital for someone with ADHD if they expect to have healthy relationships. The diagnosis should not be a source of shame. Rather, seeking help -- whether from your doctor, pastor, minister, counselor, or a trained therapist -- means that you care enough about your relationships to do the right thing. What's more, having an outside, objective source of help can be beneficial for you and your partner as you both learn how to live with ADHD.
  • Get Moving
    Although exercise may be the last thing you want to do when the pain of fibromyalgia strikes, a regular regimen of physical activity can improve your overall well-being, thereby helping to treat fibromyalgia. Choose something you enjoy so you can stick with it. Don't jump into something too strenuous, too soon, or you'll merely add to your current pain. Start with something gentle if you are out of shape. Before you know it, you'll be enjoying the benefits of increased strength, flexibility, and stamina. Some insurance programs or "healthy workplace" programs may help provide discounts for gym memberships.
  • Get Off the Couch
    Staying active is good for your heart, your bones and joints, and your diabetes! But it doesn't have to be a dreadful chore. Pick activities you like -- perhaps gardening or relaxing walks -- and build them into your routine.
  • Get Outside
    In our busy, high-tech lives, we can go days, weeks, or even entire seasons without connecting with nature. A short walk, a few minutes of yardwork, or simply finding a quiet spot to sit outdoors can help reduce stress quite a bit. You don't need to commit to hours and hours of such activities -- just a few minutes will do -- and don't let weather get in your way. Just dress for the weather and enjoy the variety of a downpour, a light snow, a bright sunny day, and a crisp fall morning.
  • Get Outside
    This simple step helps in at least two ways. It provides a little sunshine and usually helps you get a little exercise. Shovel the sidewalk, take a walk, or, if you're feeling more adventurous, go skiing or sledding.
  • Get Physical
    Inactivity leads to bone loss. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity on most days. Check with your healthcare provider first, especially if you have health problems, haven't exercised in a while, or have already broken a bone. Your healthcare provider can help you develop an exercise program that works for you.
  • Get Rid of Razor Bumps Once and for All
    One of the most common skin irritations is razor bumps, clinically known as pseudofolliculitis barbae. This eMedTV resource provides information on the causes and how to remedy razor bumps and skin irritation that results from shaving.
  • Get Some Sleep
    If you're running on empty, it's hard to recover from a bad cold. Getting plenty of sleep can help you bounce back, and not scrimping on sleep on a regular basis may even help prevent colds.
  • Get the Blues
    Are those few extra pounds making you feel blue? Embrace it! Strange as it may sound, studies have shown that the color blue actually helps to suppress appetite. So wear blue clothes and eat blueberries off of blue plates in your blue-walled dining room. You might just find that blue is the color for a new, lighter you!
  • Get to Know Your Child's Teachers
    Your child's teachers are an important part of your child's life -- they spend time with your child almost every day. Begin talking with them early, ideally before school starts. Make sure the teachers know about your child's diagnosis and things your child needs to be successful at school. Communicate often throughout the school year. You may want to check in at least once monthly, or more often if necessary, in person, on the phone, or over e-mail. And remember that communication goes both ways -- listen to the teachers' observations of your child at school, and share how things are going at home.
  • Get Your Blood Flowing
    You've probably heard it a thousand times, but that's because it's incredibly true! Exercise is the NUMBER ONE way to quickly and easily improve your mood -- if, and that's a big "if" -- it's done right. Many people who start a new exercise program try to do too much, too quickly and get frustrated. Instead, start slowly and simply. Mornings are the best time to exercise, so begin your day with a few minutes of activity. Shoot for five minutes of exercise at first -- whatever works best for you. Jumping jacks, push-ups, and deep knee bends are great exercises to get your blood flowing. Even more important, you can do them just about anywhere. If possible, do them the second you get out of bed! Keep in mind that if you have a health condition that might make physical activity dangerous, be sure to talk to your doctor before starting any new exercise program. If not, then get started tomorrow!
  • Getting Big Brother or Sister Ready for a New Baby
    Becoming a big brother or sister is exciting, but as this eMedTV article explains, having a new baby around is also a huge adjustment from what your child is used to. This selection provides helpful tips on getting your child ready for this change.
  • Getting Rid of Used Syringes (Peginterferon)
    This video clip explains how to dispose of used syringes.
  • Getting Started --Diabetic Patients
    This clip explains how your doctor can help prevent low blood sugar before a stress test.
  • Getting Started (ACL Reconstruction)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (ACL Surgery-- Hamstring)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Angioplasty and Atherectomy)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Angioplasty)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Ankle Fracture Surgery)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Aortic Valve Replacement)
    This video clip explains what to expect on the day of your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Bunion Surgery With Osteotomy)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Bunionectomy -- Fusion)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Bunionectomy With Soft Tissue Release)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Bunionectomy)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (CABG)
    This video clip explains what to expect on the day of your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Cataract Sugery)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Colonoscopy)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Getting Started (Defibrillator Placement)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (EGD With Dilation)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Getting Started (Endoscopic Carpal Tunnel Release)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Heart Bypass Surgery)
    This video clip explains what to expect on the day of your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Hip Replacement)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Loose Body Removal)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Meniscectomy)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Plica Removal)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Knee Arthroscopy With Synovectomy)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Mitral Valve Replacement)
    This video clip explains what to expect on the day of your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Pacemaker Placement)
    This video explains what you need to do to prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Pharmaceutical Cardioversion)
    This clip explains what to expect when you arrive at the hospital or cardiac care facility.
  • Getting Started (TEE)
    This video clip discusses what to expect on the day of your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Total Knee Replacement)
    This video clip highlights several things to be aware of as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started (Upper Endoscopy)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Getting Started (Wrist Surgery)
    This video clip discusses what you need to know as you prepare for your procedure.
  • Getting Started - Flexible Sigmoidoscopy
    This video segment describes what will happen on the day of your flexible sigmoidoscopy.
  • Getting Started - Information for Diabetic Patients (Tilt Table)
    This video explains what diabetics should do to prepare for the test.
  • Getting Started With a Pharmacological Stress Echocardiogram
    This video explains the steps you can take to prepare for a pharmaceutical stress test.
  • Getting Started with a Stress Echocardiogram
    This multimedia clip explores the steps you can take to prepare for a stress test.
  • Getting Started With a Stress Test
    This multimedia clip explores the steps you can take to prepare for a stress test.
  • Getting Started with an Electrophysiologic Study (EPS)
    This clip offers a step by step explanation of how your doctor will prepare you for an EPS.
  • Getting Started With Pharmacological Nuclear Scan
    This video explains the steps you can take to prepare for a pharmaceutical stress test.
  • Giarda
    Giardia is a microscopic parasite that commonly causes diarrhea. This page from the eMedTV library describes how Giardia transmission occurs and explains who is at a higher risk of developing this infection. Giarda is a common misspelling of Giardia.
  • Gilenya Side Effects
    Although usually well tolerated, Gilenya can cause side effects like headaches, diarrhea, and back pain. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth list of potential side effects that may occur with this prescription medicine, including serious problems.
  • Gingkgo
    Many people use ginkgo supplements to help improve memory and mental functioning. This eMedTV article briefly covers the effects of ginkgo and offers general warnings and precautions for this supplement. Gingkgo is a common misspelling of ginkgo.
  • Gingo Biloba
    Ginkgo biloba is a supplement that many people take to improve memory or mental functioning. This eMedTV page explores the benefits of ginkgo biloba and offers general warnings for this product. Gingo biloba is a common misspelling of ginkgo biloba.
  • Ginisang
    People often take ginseng to improve mental functioning and overall mental health. This eMedTV page describes the effects of ginseng, explores its effectiveness, and lists some of its possible side effects. Ginisang is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Glacoma
    Glaucoma is a group of diseases that share features such as optic nerve damage and high eye pressure. This eMedTV resource lists risk factors for glaucoma and explains what treatments are available. Glacoma is a common misspelling of glaucoma.
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