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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Gastrinoma - Generic Cataflam

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Gastrinoma to Generic Cataflam. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition characterized by frequent heartburn and other symptoms. This article gives a brief overview of GERD and provides a link to learn more.
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)
    Also known as GERD, gastroesophageal reflux disease is a condition that can cause frequent heartburn. This eMedTV selection briefly describes GERD, with information on symptoms, risk factors, and what can happen if the symptoms go untreated.
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux Disorder
    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid goes up into the esophagus and damages it. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of GERD. Gastroesophageal reflux disorder is more commonly known as GERD.
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux in Infants
    As this eMedTV article explains, gastroesophageal reflux in infants is not usually a cause for alarm. Most infants are healthy and happy, even though they may spit up. In most cases, they outgrow this condition by the time they are a year old.
  • Gastroesophageal Reflux in Newborns
    As this eMedTV article explains, many babies experience gastroesophageal reflux (which is when the stomach's contents come back up through the esophagus). This page covers the causes, symptoms, and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in newborns.
  • Gastrointestinal Anthrax
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, gastrointestinal anthrax is a disease caused by eating meat contaminated with anthrax bacteria or their spores. This article describes possible symptoms of this condition and explains how it is treated.
  • Gastrointestinal Problems
    Over time, diabetic neuropathy can affect the nerves that control the circulatory, digestive, hormonal, and visual systems, among other things. This is called autonomic neuropathy. When the gastrointestinal system is affected, it most commonly results in symptoms like constipation, nausea and vomiting, bloating, diarrhea, and loss of appetite. If left unchecked, the problem may become worse and lead to weight loss.
  • Gatifloxacin
    The antibiotic gatifloxacin is commonly prescribed to treat eye infections. This page from the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed look at this drug, with information on possible side effects, dosing, how it works, and more.
  • Gatifloxacin and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that although gatifloxacin does pass through breast milk in rats when taken by mouth, whether this is true in humans is unknown, especially since it is used as an eye drop. This page stresses discussing this with your doctor.
  • Gatifloxacin and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article describes the results of animal studies on gatifloxacin and pregnancy (these studies used oral formulations). As this article explains, the benefits should still outweigh the risks before a pregnant woman uses the eye drop formulation.
  • Gatifloxacin Dosage
    Although your gatifloxacin dose will depend on the severity of your eye infection, this eMedTV segment explains that most people apply it two to eight times a day for a week. This page also provides tips to ensure the effectiveness of the antibiotic.
  • Gatifloxacin Eye Drops
    This segment from the eMedTV library presents a brief look at using gatifloxacin eye drops to treat bacterial conjunctivitis. It explains how the prescription medicine works and what to do if you are using other eyes drops at the same time.
  • Gatifloxacin Medication Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides some basic information on gatifloxacin, a medication used to treat pink eye. It includes general dosing guidelines, what to tell the doctor prescribing it, and links to more details on this product.
  • Gatifloxacin Ophthalmic Solution
    This eMedTV article presents a brief overview of the ophthalmic product gatifloxacin, a solution for pink eye. This segment provides some basic dosing information and includes a link to more detailed information on this eye drop.
  • Gatifloxacin Overdose
    Because there are no reported cases of gatifloxacin overdoses, the effects are largely unknown. This eMedTV page describes what might happen if someone uses too much of this medicine, either orally or in the eye, as well as the likely treatment options.
  • Gatifloxacin Side Effects
    In clinical studies, the most common gatifloxacin side effects were eye irritation and eye pain. This eMedTV article lists more common reactions to this antibiotic eye drop, as well as potentially serious side effects that require prompt medical care.
  • Gatifloxcin
    This page from the eMedTV library provides a brief look at gatifloxacin, which is used to treat bacterial conjunctivitis. It addresses general dosing guidelines and important treatment precautions. Gatifloxcin is a common misspelling of gatifloxacin.
  • Gatifloxicin
    Pink eye is a common eye infection; however, it can usually be treated with gatifloxacin. This eMedTV page describes this drug in some detail, including side effects to be aware of during treatment. Gatifloxicin is a common misspelling of gatifloxacin.
  • Geadon
    Geodon is a medication that is used for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This eMedTV page describes the prescription drug in more detail and further discusses its effects and how it works. Geadon is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Geardia
    Giardia is a parasite that causes a diarrheal illness called giardiasis. This eMedTV resource explains where the parasite is found, how it is transmitted, and what treatment options are available. Geardia is a common misspelling of Giardia.
  • Gedon
    Geodon is a medicine that is used for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV page describes how Geodon works, explains its effects, and lists side effects that may occur with the drug. Gedon is a common misspelling of Geodon.
  • Gefitinib
    Gefitinib is a drug used to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV page presents an overview of this prescription medicine, including when it is recommended, how it is taken, and what to expect.
  • Gefitinib Dosage
    This eMedTV page examines dosing guidelines for gefitinib, with details on how much you will be prescribed, how often you will take it, and how long treatment will last. A number of helpful tips on how to best use this chemotherapy drug are also included.
  • Gefitinib Drug Information
    Gefitinib is a prescription medication approved to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV Web selection features more information on gefitinib, including how this chemotherapy drug is taken, possible side effects, and more.
  • Gefitinib Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article discusses, gefitinib is known to cause side effects in most of the people who take it. Some of the common reactions, such as diarrhea and nausea, are listed, as are serious problems that require immediate medical treatment.
  • Gefitnib
    Gefitinib is a chemotherapy medicine prescribed for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using it. Gefitnib is a common misspelling of gefitinib.
  • Geftinib
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, gefitinib is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat non-small cell lung cancer. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Geftinib is a common misspelling of gefitinib.
  • Gelnique
    Gelnique is a prescription skin gel that is used to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this drug, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips for when and how to use it.
  • Gelnique and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Gelnique (oxybutynin gel) passes through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV resource offers more information on breastfeeding and Gelnique, and discusses the importance of talking to your doctor about your situation.
  • Gelnique and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is probably safe for pregnant women to use Gelnique (oxybutynin gel), although the full risks are not currently known. This page explores this topic in more detail, including the results of animal studies done on the drug.
  • Gelnique Dosage
    As this page from the eMedTV site explains, the standard dosage of Gelnique for treating an overactive bladder is one packet of gel applied to the skin once daily. This article also offers suggestions on when and how to effectively use this medication.
  • Gelnique Drug Interactions
    Pramlintide, anticholinergic drugs, and acetylcholinesterase inhibitors may interact with Gelnique. This eMedTV Web article describes the possible side effects or complications that may develop with these and other drug interactions.
  • Gelnique Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides some information on Gelnique, a medication used to treat overactive bladder symptoms. This page talks about how to use the medicine and explains what to discuss with the doctor prescribing it.
  • Gelnique Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that vomiting, disorientation, and difficulty passing urine are among the possible signs of a Gelnique (oxybutynin gel) overdose. This page also describes possible treatment options that are available for an overdose.
  • Gelnique Side Effects
    Common side effects of Gelnique may include a dry mouth, fatigue, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web resource outlines other possible side effects of the drug, and describes which side effects are potentially serious and may require medical attention.
  • Gelnique Uses
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Gelnique to adults who have an overactive bladder. This part of the eMedTV Web site describes the uses of Gelnique in more detail. This page also explains how the medicine works and whether there are off-label uses.
  • Gelnique Warnings and Precautions
    Before taking Gelnique, tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, liver disease, or any allergies. This eMedTV Web article contains other warnings and precautions for Gelnique, and includes important information on who should not take the medication.
  • Gemcitabine
    Gemcitabine is a prescription drug that is approved for treating several types of cancer. This eMedTV resource discusses how the medication works, lists potential side effects, and offers information on how to receive the injection.
  • Gemcitabine Dosing
    Gemcitabine dosing recommendations are made based on your height, weight, and other factors. This eMedTV Web page lists other factors your doctor will consider before prescribing your gemcitabine dosage and explains how the drug is administered.
  • Gemcitabine Drug Information
    Gemcitabine can help treat ovarian cancer, breast cancer, and other conditions. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at gemcitabine, with information on how the chemotherapy drug is administered and what to expect. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Gemcitabine Side Effects
    Hair loss, anemia, and drowsiness are some examples of common gemcitabine side effects. This portion of the eMedTV library offers a more complete list of common side effects and explains which side effects require immediate medical attention.
  • Gemfibrizil
    Gemfibrozil is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV Web article explains how this medication works and describes possible side effects. Gemfibrizil is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemfibrizol
    If you have high cholesterol or triglycerides, your doctor may prescribe gemfibrozil. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes this drug in more detail and covers some of its effects. Gemfibrizol is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemfibrosil Side Effects
    Common side effects of gemfibrozil include nausea, vomiting, and heartburn. This eMedTV page also lists serious side effects that require medical attention. Gemfibrosil side effects is a common variation and misspelling of side effects of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemfibrozal
    This eMedTV article offers an overview of gemfibrozil, a prescription medication used to treat high triglycerides and high cholesterol. This page also covers some general precautions for the medicine. Gemfibrozal is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemfibrozil
    Gemfibrozil is a common prescription drug approved for the treatment of high triglycerides and cholesterol. This eMedTV article also lists uses of the medication, side effects, and conditions to tell your healthcare provider about before you take it.
  • Gemfibrozil 600 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, a doctor may recommend a starting dosage of gemfibrozil 600 mg tablets twice daily to lower triglycerides and cholesterol. This article further discusses gemfibrozil dosing guidelines and tips for using this medication.
  • Gemfibrozil Information
    This eMedTV contains information on gemfibrozil, a drug used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This resource explores side effects, dosing guidelines, and more. Also included is a link to more in-depth information.
  • Gemfibrozil Oral
    As this eMedTV article explains, gemfibrozil oral tablets are a prescription medication used to lower triglycerides and cholesterol. This article describes how this medication works, lists possible side effects, and covers general dosing tips.
  • Gemfibrozil Tablets
    A doctor may prescribe gemfibrozil tablets to help lower triglyceride and cholesterol levels. This eMedTV Web resource offers more detail on gemfibrozil tablets, including information on potential side effects and general dosing guidelines.
  • Gemfibrozol
    Gemfibrozil is a prescribed drug used to treat high triglyceride and high cholesterol levels. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of this drug, including dosing tips and some general precautions. Gemfibrozol is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemfibrozole
    Gemfibrozil is a prescription medicine used to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV segment covers other gemfibrozil uses and explains what to be aware of before using this drug. Gemfibrozole is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemifibrozil
    Gemfibrozil is a prescription drug approved to treat high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV resource covers other gemfibrozil uses and lists potential side effects of the medicine. Gemifibrozil is a common misspelling of gemfibrozil.
  • Gemifloxacin
    Gemifloxacin is prescribed to treat pneumonia and bronchitis. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers an in-depth look at this antibiotic, providing details on its dosing, possible side effects, safety warnings, and more.
  • Gemifloxacin Dosage
    As this eMedTV page discusses, your gemifloxacin dose will depend on the type of infection being treated and your kidney function. This page further discusses dosing guidelines for treating certain bacterial infections and lists tips for taking this drug.
  • Gemifloxacin Drug Information
    Available only by prescription, gemifloxacin is an antibiotic used to treat pneumonia and bronchitis. This eMedTV article offers important information on gemifloxacin, including how the drug works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Gemifloxacin Mysilate
    Gemifloxacin is a prescription drug licensed to treat certain bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment discusses how it works, lists specific uses, and covers potential side effects. Gemifloxacin mysilate is a common misspelling of gemifloxacin mesylate.
  • Gemzar
    Gemzar is a prescription medicine often used for treating various types of cancer. This eMedTV article gives an overview of Gemzar, providing information on how the medication works, it potential side effects, and how it is administered.
  • Gemzar and Breastfeeding
    It is generally not recommended that women take Gemzar while breastfeeding. This part of the eMedTV archives explains that there have been no human studies done on Gemzar and breastfeeding, but there are potentially serious side effects of the drug.
  • Gemzar and Hair Loss
    Hair loss is one of the most common side effects of Gemzar. This portion of the eMedTV archives offers more information on Gemzar and hair loss, explaining when hair loss typically occurs during treatment and some tips on dealing with hair loss.
  • Gemzar and Pregnancy
    Studies suggest that Gemzar could potentially cause miscarriages or birth defects to an unborn child. This eMedTV page explains that if you're taking Gemzar and pregnancy occurs (or you're thinking of becoming pregnant), you should tell your doctor.
  • Gemzar Chemotherapy
    This eMedTV Web article takes a quick look at the chemotherapy drug Gemzar. It explains how the medication is given, who can use it, and what to expect. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Gemzar Dosage
    The Gemzar dosage your doctor prescribes will be based on several factors (such as weight and height). This eMedTV article explains other factors that may determine your dosage and discusses some general Gemzar dosing guidelines.
  • Gemzar Drug Interactions
    In general, you should avoid live vaccinations while taking Gemzar or other chemotherapy drugs. This eMedTV resource lists other drugs that can potentially cause Gemzar drug interactions (including NSAIDs, warfarin, and salicylates).
  • Gemzar Side Effects
    A few of the common side effects of Gemzar include hair loss, anemia, and drowsiness. This eMedTV segment lists other possible side effects of the drug, including rare but serious problems that should be reported to a healthcare provider right away.
  • Gemzar Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Gemzar is used for treating breast cancer, ovarian cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, and pancreatic cancer. This page explains how the drug works to stop cancer cells from multiplying and covers off-label Gemzar uses.
  • Gemzar Warnings and Precautions
    Gemzar can cause kidney damage or liver problems in some people. This portion of the eMedTV Web site offers other important Gemzar warnings and precautions you should be aware of before starting the medication, and explains who should not take Gemzar.
  • Genatal Warts -- Information
    Genital warts usually appear within weeks or months after sexual contact with an infected individual. This eMedTV page explains what causes the condition and lists treatments that are available. Genatal warts is a common misspelling of genital warts.
  • Genatell Warts Information
    One of the most common types of sexually transmitted diseases is genital warts. This eMedTV resource describes what genital warts look like and explains where they usually appear. Genatell warts is a common misspelling of genital warts.
  • Genatile Warts Symptoms and Signs
    Genital warts are the most common symptoms of a genital HPV infection. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes other potential genital warts symptoms. Genatile warts symptoms and signs is a common misspelling of genital warts symptoms.
  • Gene Therapy and Parkinson's
    As this eMedTV page explains, gene therapy may prove to be a promising treatment for Parkinson's disease. This article discusses the use of gene therapy in more detail, including information on the use of viruses in this form of treatment.
  • Gene Therapy for Thalassemia Major
    This eMedTV resource describes current research on gene therapy for thalassemia major, which may offer a cure for the disease. This genetic therapy could involve inserting genes to replace abnormal ones or encouraging fetal hemoglobin production.
  • General Anesthesia (ACL Reconstruction)
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • General Anesthesia (Mitral Valve Replacement)
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • General Anesthesia for ACL Reconstruction
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • General Anesthesia for Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • General Anesthesia for Heart Bypass Surgery
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • General Anesthesia for Liver Donation Surgery
    This video discusses the general anesthesia that will be used during the liver transplant surgery.
  • General Herpes
    Genital herpes, a sexually transmitted disease, usually affects the genitals or rectum. This eMedTV resource describes common symptoms of the condition and explains what causes the infection. General herpes is a common misspelling of genital herpes.
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder
    Generalized anxiety disorder causes people to feel constant, severe anxiety, often without a reason. This eMedTV Web page offers more facts on the condition, including the symptoms, causes, and treatment options.
  • Generess Fe
    As a prescription birth control pill, Generess Fe works to prevent pregnancy mainly by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV article offers a detailed description on how Generess Fe works and also discusses its possible side effects and dosing guidelines.
  • Generess Fe and Breastfeeding
    Women are usually advised to avoid using combined contraceptives (such as Generess Fe) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource further explores this topic, explaining how this birth control pill can affect the quality and production of breast milk.
  • Generess Fe and Pregnancy
    Do not intentionally take Generess Fe when pregnant. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on taking this contraceptive during pregnancy, explaining whether it would cause problems in a developing baby.
  • Generess Fe and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page explains that although some women may gain weight while taking Generess Fe, it is unlikely that the weight gain is due to the birth control pill. This article explores this topic, including helpful tips on how to control your weight.
  • Generess Fe Birth Control Information
    This eMedTV Web selection provides important information on Generess Fe, a birth control pill that can be chewed. This article offers a brief overview of the oral contraceptive, including how it works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Generess Fe Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the dosing guidelines for Generess Fe are the same for all women. This article also offers detailed information on what to do if you forget to take a dose and outlines some important tips on taking the pill.
  • Generess Fe Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that taking Generess Fe with certain medications can make the birth control pill less effective. This article lists the drugs that can cause negative interactions with Generess Fe and describes other problems that can occur.
  • Generess Fe Overdose
    If you have taken too much Generess Fe, it may cause nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV page covers other overdose effects and treatment options, and explains the potential dangers of iron toxicity if children accidentally overdose on these pills.
  • Generess Fe Side Effects
    A few of the common side effects of Generess Fe include headaches, nausea, and breast pain. This eMedTV Web selection describes other common reactions to Generess Fe, as well as potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical care.
  • Generess Fe Uses
    Generess Fe is prescribed to prevent pregnancy in adult and adolescent females who are of reproductive age. This eMedTV resource explains how this contraceptive works and explores other possible Generess Fe uses, such as its off-label use for acne.
  • Generess Fe Warnings and Precautions
    Generess Fe can make depression worse or increase your blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page lists other warnings and precautions to be aware of before starting Generess Fe, including information on who should not use the contraceptive.
  • Generic Abilify
    Generic Abilify won't be available until at least April 2015. This eMedTV page explains that while many companies claim to sell generic forms of Abilify, these drugs may be fake, substandard, and potentially dangerous -- and should not be purchased.
  • Generic Abilify Maintena
    At this time, generic Abilify Maintena (aripiprazole ER injection) is not available. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers a discussion on why this is the case and whether a generic version of the drug might become available at some point in the future.
  • Generic Abraxane
    There is currently no generic Abraxane available on the market. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at when a generic might become available and explains the difference between a "generic name" and a "generic version" of a drug.
  • Generic Abreva
    This eMedTV Web page discusses generic Abreva. It explores why a generic version is currently unavailable, when it may become available, and factors that can delay this. The difference between generic names and generic versions is also explained.
  • Generic Absorica
    Companies are not allowed to make generic Absorica products at this time. However, as this eMedTV article explains, generic versions may become available after certain patents expire. This page discusses when this might occur and what may delay this date.
  • Generic Abstral
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there are currently no generic Abstral (fentanyl sublingual tablets) products. This page discusses when a generic version might become available and describes the difference between "generic name" and "generic version."
  • Generic Acanya
    At this time, no generic versions of Acanya (clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide) are available. This eMedTV page explains when a generic version might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Accolate
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic versions of Accolate (zafirlukast) are now available. This article explains who makes the generic versions and describes how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Accupril
    This page on the eMedTV Web site covers generic Accupril, which is manufactured by several companies and is sold under the name Quinapril Tablets. This page also lists several available strengths of the drug.
  • Generic Accutane
    At this time, three generic versions of Accutane (isotretinoin) are available. This eMedTV page explores these generic Accutane products, including information on how the FDA has determined that these generics are equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Actifed
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic forms of Actifed are available, sold under various names and by different manufacturers. This page further discusses generic Actifed and explains why the brand-name original version is no longer sold.
  • Generic Actiq Lozenges
    There are generic Actiq lozenges available at this time, sold under the name fentanyl lozenges. This eMedTV Web segment further explores these generic lozenges, including details on whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Actos
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, generic Actos (pioglitazone) is now available. This article takes a closer look at these generic products, including who makes them and whether they are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Adderall
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Adderall and Adderall XR are currently approved for sale. This article also discusses the available strengths of the generic versions and provides a list of the companies that make them.
  • Generic Adipex
    Adipex is currently available in brand-name and generic form. As this article from the eMedTV site explains, generic Adipex tablets and capsules are available in one strength (phentermine 37.5 mg) and are made by several drug companies.
  • Generic Advair
    There is currently no approved generic version of Advair for sale. As this eMedTV Web page explains, brand-name Advair is protected by exclusivity rights for the time being. This article discusses when a generic version could become available.
  • Generic Advicor
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is no generic form of Advicor at this time. This article talks about when to expect a generic version and explains why combining generic lovastatin and non-prescription niacin is not the same as generic Advicor.
  • Generic Aldara
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Aldara (imiquimod) is available in one strength and form. This resource contains a list of companies that make the generic versions and explains whether these products are as good as brand-name Aldara.
  • Generic Allegra
    As this eMedTV page describes, generic Allegra is sold under the name Fexofenadine hydrochloride tablets and comes in three different strengths. This article also takes a look at what the drug is used to treat, as well as who manufactures it.
  • Generic Allegra-D
    A generic version of the 24-hour strength of Allegra-D is now available. This section of the eMedTV library talks about generic Allegra-D in more detail, addressing when a generic version of the 12-hour strength is expected.
  • Generic Alphagan
    There are generic Alphagan (brimonidine) products currently available. This page from the eMedTV site outlines the various forms and strengths available for the eye medication, and discusses when generic versions of all Alphagan products may be produced.
  • Generic Alphagan P
    As this time, a generic is available for the higher strength of Alphagan P, but not for the lower strength. This eMedTV page discusses when a generic Alphagan 0.1% may become available and describes other generics that may be possible alternatives.
  • Generic Ambien
    As this eMedTV segment explains, generic Ambien is available in 5 mg and 10 mg tablets. This article further explores the generic version, explaining why it should be just as good as the brand-name medicine and listing companies that manufacture it.
  • Generic Ambien CR
    As this eMedTV page explains, you can buy Ambien CR in generic form. This article talks about the generic versions in more detail, with information on who makes them and how they compare to brand-name Ambien CR.
  • Generic Ancef
    Only generic Ancef (cefazolin) products are available, as the brand-name form is no longer manufactured. This eMedTV segment highlights the various strengths that are available. It also discusses whether these generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Androderm
    There are currently no generic Androderm (testosterone patch) products available. This page of the eMedTV Web site addresses why no company is making a generic version and discusses the risks of buying a generic version from another country.
  • Generic AndroGel
    At this time, AndroGel (testosterone gel) is not available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV archives explores when generic AndroGel may become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a medication.
  • Generic Aplenzin
    As this eMedTV article explains, there are no generic Aplenzin (bupropion hydrobromide) products available at this time. This page discusses why there are currently no generic versions of this drug and explains when a generic might become available.
  • Generic Armour Thyroid
    Some generic drugs have the same components as Armour Thyroid (thyroid USP), but, as this eMedTV article explains, it's difficult to know if these products are equivalent to Armour Thyroid. They may not truly be considered a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Aromasin
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, you can now buy Aromasin in generic form. This segment explains who manufactures the generic version and how it compares to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Astelin
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Astelin is now available in generic form. This resource offers more information on this product, including who makes it, how it compares to the brand-name version, and more.
  • Generic Ativan
    As explained in this eMedTV article, generic Ativan is made by several companies and is available in different strengths. This resource offers an more information on this topic, including a description of the FDA's testing system for generics.
  • Generic Augmentin
    Currently, both brand-name and generic Augmentin is licensed for sale. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists the companies that manufacture these generic products and explains what strengths are available for the various forms of Augmentin.
  • Generic Augmentin XR
    As this eMedTV article explains, the antibiotic Augmentin XR (amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium XR) comes in both brand-name and generic form. This segment explains how the generic version of Augmentin XR compares to the brand-name product.
  • Generic Avalide
    As this eMedTV article explains, Avalide (irbesartan/HCTZ) is now available in generic form. This resource explains who makes the generic versions and describes how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Avandia
    This eMedTV page talks about why there is currently no generic Avandia for sale on the market, with information on when the next patent for the drug is set to expire. It also explains the difference between a "generic name" and a "generic drug."
  • Generic Avodart
    This eMedTV segment explains why generic Avodart is not available in the United States, and when a generic version could become available. This article also explains why it's important to avoid buying imitations.
  • Generic Azopt
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are currently no generic Azopt (brinzolamide) products available. This page discusses when a generic version may become available and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Bactroban
    At this time, only the skin ointment form of Bactroban comes as a generic. This eMedTV page lists the companies who make it, discusses when the other forms will be sold as generics, and explains why the skin ointment should not be used in the nose.
  • Generic Benicar
    A patent currently prohibits any generic version of Benicar from being manufactured. This eMedTV page explains when generic Benicar may become available and advises against purchasing any drug that claims to be a generic version of the medication.
  • Generic BenzaClin
    You can buy a generic BenzaClin (clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide) skin gel at this time. This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at this generic product, including who makes it and whether it is as good as the brand-name version of the drug.
  • Generic Boniva
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Boniva (ibandronate sodium) is now available in both brand-name and generic form. This article looks at how the generic version compares to brand-name Boniva and includes details on who manufactures a generic version.
  • Generic Bontril
    Generic Bontril is available in short-acting form under the name Phendimetrazine tablets. This eMedTV page explains why the long-acting form of Bontril is not available in generic form and describes why phendimetrazine is equivalent to Bontril PDM.
  • Generic Brand of Darvocet
    Besides brand-name Darvocet, there is also a generic brand of Darvocet licensed for sale. As this eMedTV page explains, generic Darvocet is sold under the name "propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen" and is available in three different strengths.
  • Generic Bromday
    As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, Bromday (bromfenac) is now available in both brand-name and generic form. This article tells you what you need to know about the generic version of this drug, including how it compares to brand-name Bromday.
  • Generic Bromfenac Dosing
    Available as brand-name and generic products, bromfenac eye drops call for once- or twice-daily dosing. This eMedTV segment provides more dosing instructions for this medicine, including how long it is used. It also offers a link to more information.
  • Generic Bumex
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Bumex is available in tablet or injectable form (the latter is for hospital use only). This article lists the available strengths of the generic version and also lists some of the companies that manufacture it.
  • Generic Bystolic
    Bystolic (nebivolol) is currently not available in generic form. This section of the eMedTV library explores when generic Bystolic products may become available and explains the difference between a generic medication and its "generic name."
  • Generic Candesartan
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, you can now purchase generic candesartan (Atacand). This article tells you what you need to know about the generic versions, including the names of the companies that make them.
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