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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Exubera and Pregnancy - Femtrace

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Exubera and Pregnancy to Femtrace. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Exubera and Pregnancy
    This page of the eMedTV library explores the link between Exubera and pregnancy, explaining why the FDA has classified it as a pregnancy Category C medicine. This page also explains when the drug may be given to a pregnant woman.
  • Exubera Dosing
    Your Exubera dosage will depend on several factors, such as body weight and the type of diabetes you have. This eMedTV segment outlines other factors that make up Exubera dosing guidelines and offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Exubera Drug Information
    This eMedTV segment provides information on Exubera, a diabetes drug that has been discontinued. This article explains why the drug is no longer being made and includes a link to learn more about this product.
  • Exubera Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page explores potential Exubera drug interactions with other medicines, such as oral contraceptives, diuretics, and estrogens. This page also explains the potentially negative consequences that these interactions can cause.
  • Exubera Overdose
    This portion of the eMedTV archives describes possible effects of an Exubera overdose, such as dizziness, cold sweats, and extreme hunger. This page also outlines treatment options for an overdose, such as supportive care measures.
  • Exubera Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Exubera can include low blood sugar, coughing, and a sinus infection. This eMedTV segment also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious side effects, including allergic reactions and difficulty breathing.
  • Exubera Uses
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview of Exubera uses and explains how it works to lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The article also discusses giving the drug to children and off-label uses.
  • Exubera Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article examines a number of Exubera warnings and precautions, such as the potential for allergic reactions and the danger of taking the drug when pregnant or breastfeeding. This page also lists people who should not take the drug.
  • Exubra
    Exubera is an inhaled drug used to lower blood sugar in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how the drug is packaged and taken and also lists potential side effects. Exubra is a common misspelling of Exubera.
  • Eye Exam Recommendations
    Eye exam recommendations provide guidelines on how often exams should take place. This part of the eMedTV library includes a chart that offers general recommendations (based on age and symptoms) on how often you should see your eye care professional.
  • Eyelea
    Eylea is an eye medicine prescribed to treat a certain eye conditions. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at this prescription drug, including how it is given and potential side effects. Eyela is a common misspelling of Eylea.
  • Eyes
    This video clip discusses the parts of the eye involved with sight.
  • Eyesight Correction
    This clip explains why people may need corrective lenses or surgery to correct their vision.
  • Eyesight Correction (PRK)
    This clip explains why people may need corrective lenses or surgery to correct their vision.
  • Eylea
    Eylea is a medicine injected into the eye to help slow down vision loss caused by wet macular degeneration. This eMedTV resource lists another use for this medication and explains how it works, when it is given, potential side effects, and more.
  • Eylea and Breastfeeding
    No studies have been done to determine if Eylea (aflibercept) passes through human breast milk. This eMedTV segment covers why it may not be safe to receive this eye medicine while breastfeeding and explains what the manufacturer of the drug recommends.
  • Eylea and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource addresses the question of whether Eylea (aflibercept) is safe for pregnant women. This article explains how this drug may increase the risk for birth defects and stresses the importance of talking to your healthcare provider.
  • Eylea Dosage
    Eylea comes as an injection that is given in the affected eye(s). This eMedTV segment examines dosing guidelines for this eye medicine in detail, including when and how the injections are administered.
  • Eylea Drug Interactions
    Because Eylea is injected in the eye, it is unlikely to interact with other medications. However, as this eMedTV page explains, this eye medicine has not been thoroughly studied with other drugs, so interactions could still be a possibility with Eylea.
  • Eylea Medication Information
    If you have a certain type of macular degeneration, you may benefit from Eylea. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on Eylea, including details how the medication can prevent vision loss. A link to more details is also included.
  • Eylea Side Effects
    During clinical trials on Eylea, side effects that were commonly reported included eye pain and blood spots. This eMedTV article offers a detailed list of other reactions this medicine might cause, including those that may require medical treatment.
  • Eylea Uses
    Eylea helps prevent and possibly reverse vision loss due to certain eye conditions. This eMedTV Web selection provides a discussion on macular edema and macular degeneration, and explains why using Eylea may be an effective treatment.
  • Eylea Warnings and Precautions
    Do not use Eylea if you have an inflammation within the eye or have an eye infection. This page of the eMedTV site explains some of the important precautions and warnings with Eylea to review before beginning treatment, including potential complications.
  • Ezetimib
    Ezetimibe is a prescription drug licensed to treat high cholesterol and sitosterolemia. This selection from the eMedTV Web library lists possible side effects and general precautions with the drug. Ezetimib is a common misspelling of ezetimibe.
  • Ezetimiba
    This eMedTV page explains that ezetimibe is a prescription drug used to treat high cholesterol and sitosterolemia. This page also covers some general precautions to be aware of before taking the drug. Ezetimiba is a common misspelling of ezetimibe.
  • Ezetimibe
    Ezetimibe is a prescription drug often used to treat high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page lists specific ezetimibe uses and also provides information on dosing guidelines, how the drug works, available strengths, and overdose symptoms.
  • Ezetimibe and Simvastatin Drug Information
    If you are looking for some basic drug information on ezetimibe/simvastatin, this eMedTV resource is a great place to start. This article discusses how this cholesterol drug works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Ezetimibe Medication
    Ezetimibe is a drug used for the treatment of several conditions, including high cholesterol. This eMedTV page takes a quick look at ezetimibe, explaining how the medication works, what to expect, how to take it, and more.
  • Ezetimibe/Simvastatin
    Ezetimibe/simvastatin is commonly prescribed to treat high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV resource describes how the medication works, explains when and how to take it, lists some of its potential side effects, and more.
  • Ezetimibe/Simvastatin Dosage
    The recommended starting dosage of ezetimibe/simvastatin is 10/20 mg daily, taken with the evening meal. This eMedTV segment offers detailed dosing guidelines and includes tips and precautions for those using this medicine to lower cholesterol.
  • Ezitimibe
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a healthcare provider may prescribe ezetimibe to treat high cholesterol or sitosterolemia. This page also lists possible side effects and drug precautions. Ezitimibe is a common misspelling of ezetimibe.
  • Ezogabine
    Ezogabine is a medication used to treat partial-onset seizures in adults. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at this prescription drug, including details on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions to be aware of.
  • Ezogabine Dosage
    As this eMedTV article discusses, your ezogabine dose will depend on your age and other medical conditions you may have, among other factors. This page further explores these other factors and offers some recommendations on when and how to take this drug.
  • Ezogabine Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource presents some general information on ezogabine, a drug prescribed to control partial-onset seizures in adults. This page also discusses general dosing guidelines and safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Fabior
    Fabior is a prescription acne medication applied once a day in the evening. This eMedTV resource provides a complete overview of this medicated foam, including how it works, general dosing tips, potential side effects, and more.
  • Fabior Acne Medication
    Fabior is licensed to help clear up acne in adults and adolescents. This selection from the eMedTV Web library also explains what your doctor needs to know before you can use Fabior and links to more details on this acne medication.
  • Fabior and Breastfeeding
    Women may not be able to safely use Fabior (tazarotene foam) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web page talks about whether this drug passes through breast milk and explains what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this product.
  • Fabior and Pregnancy
    Using Fabior (tazarotene foam) during pregnancy could cause birth defects and other dangerous problems. This eMedTV examination of the dangers of using Fabior during pregnancy includes details on why women must use birth control during treatment.
  • Fabior Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, the recommended Fabior dosage is standard for everyone -- apply the foam on the affected areas of the skin once daily in the evening. This page also contains a list of helpful tips on properly using this product.
  • Fabior Drug Interactions
    When certain products or medications are used in combination with Fabior, drug interactions can occur. This eMedTV resource describes some of the complications these reactions may cause, and also offers ways to help minimize your risk for these problems.
  • Fabior Overdose
    Some of the possible Fabior (tazarotene foam) overdose effects include severe skin redness and discomfort. This eMedTV Web page describes other effects that may result from an overdose and discusses how these problems may be treated.
  • Fabior Side Effects
    Skin irritation, redness, and dryness are some of the most common side effects of Fabior. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, there are more serious side effects that require prompt medical care, such as hives or other allergic reactions.
  • Fabior Uses
    Fabior is a prescription skin foam approved for treating acne in adults and adolescents (age 12 and older). This eMedTV article examines the use of Fabior in more detail, including information on how it works and whether there are off-label uses.
  • Fabior Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV segment examines a number of Fabior warnings and precautions, including who should not use this acne medication and what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. It also describes possible complications that may occur.
  • Facial Cellulitis
    Facial cellulitis is a bacterial skin infection that occurs on the face. This section of the eMedTV archives discusses facial cellulitis in detail, including information about its symptoms and common treatment options for the infection.
  • Facial Cellulitus
    Facial cellulitis, as this eMedTV page explains, occurs when bacteria infect the skin on the face. Risk factors, symptoms, and treatment are provided, as is a link to more information. Facial cellulitus is a common misspelling of facial cellulitis.
  • Facing Diabetes
    As this eMedTV article explains, facing diabetes can be hard, but it's important to take an active role in controlling your condition. This Web page offers some basic information to get you started and includes a link to more details.
  • Facing High Blood Pressure
    No one wants high blood pressure. However, as this eMedTV page explains, facing your diagnosis and getting treatment is important if you want to avoid certain health problems years from now. This article takes a closer look at how to do this.
  • Factiva Antibiotic
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Factive is used to treat pneumonia and bronchitis. This page discusses how this prescription antibiotic works and describes some general safety concerns. Factiva antibiotic is a common misspelling of Factive antibiotic.
  • Factive
    Factive is an antibiotic prescribed to treat bronchitis and pneumonia. This page of the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, dosing tips, safety precautions, and more.
  • Factive Antibiotic Information
    Your doctor may prescribe Factive to treat certain bacterial infections, including bronchitis and pneumonia. This eMedTV page offers more information on Factive, including possible side effects of the antibiotic and general safety precautions.
  • Facts About Colin Cancer
    As this eMedTV page explains, colon cancer occurs when cancer cells originate in the colon (part of the digestive system). This page offers an overview of the condition. Facts about colin cancer is a common misspelling and variation of colon cancer.
  • Facts About Heart Disease
    This eMedTV page shares important facts about heart disease and provides links to more information. By arming yourself with this knowledge, you can make lifestyle choices that prevent heart disease or minimize its impact if you already have it.
  • Facts About High Blood Pressure
    This eMedTV Web article lists some basic facts about high blood pressure, including what it is, how it is treated, and more. A link to more detailed information on this condition is also included.
  • Facts About OCD
    This part of the eMedTV site shares some basic facts about OCD (obsessive-compulsive disorder), including common symptoms, what can happen if the illness is left untreated, and more. Also included is a link to more detailed information.
  • Facts About Osteogenesis Imperfecta
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents some basic facts on osteogenesis imperfecta, a condition that affects a person's bones. It explains how many children are affected by this condition, what causes it, and treatment, with a link to learn more.
  • Facts About Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV selection has facts about rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune disease. It takes a look at the most common symptoms of this condition and how they typically appear. Also included is a link to more information.
  • Facts About Scabies
    This page of the eMedTV library provides some general facts about scabies you may find useful. This includes the culprit behind the infection, how it is transmitted, symptoms, and treatment, with a link to learn even more.
  • Facts About Strep Throat
    Cough and/or runny nose do not typically occur in someone with strep throat. This eMedTV Web resource outlines several other important facts about strep throat, including possible symptoms and treatment options.
  • False Labor
    False labor is identified by contractions that don't become stronger or go away after changing position. This eMedTV resource explains in detail this and other differences between Braxton-Hicks contractions and true labor.
  • False-Positive Pregnancy Test
    Why would my home pregnancy test give a positive result if I'm not actually pregnant? In this eMedTV article, we tell you what you need to know about this rare occurrence, with in-depth info on what causes a false positive and how to reduce your risk.
  • Famara
    Femara is a prescription drug used to treat breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV selection briefly describes the medication, including its uses, who can take it, and possible side effects. Famara is a common misspelling of Femara.
  • Famciclovir
    Famciclovir is an antiviral medication used for treating shingles, genital herpes, and cold sores. This eMedTV article offers dosing information for the medication, explains how it works, describes its clinical effects for various conditions, and more.
  • Famcyclovir
    Famciclovir is a medicine that is used for treating cold sores, shingles, and genital herpes. This eMedTV page offers more information on famciclovir and its uses, effects, and possible side effects. Famcyclovir is a common misspelling of famciclovir.
  • Famfir
    Famvir is a medication that is available by prescription to treat shingles, genital herpes, and cold sores. This eMedTV article describes Famvir in more detail and explores the effects of this drug. Famfir is a common misspelling of Famvir.
  • Familial Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
    Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis differs from sporadic ALS in that it is passed on to family members. This eMedTV page explains the genetic mutation that may be responsible for the disease and links to information on symptoms, treatment, and more.
  • Famivar
    Famvir (an antiviral drug) is used to treat genital herpes, cold sores, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment provides an overview of the drug and includes a link to more detailed information. Famivar is a common misspelling of Famvir.
  • Famivir
    Famvir is a drug used to treat conditions such as genital herpes and shingles. This page on the eMedTV Web site briefly explores this drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Famivir is a common misspelling of Famvir.
  • Famotadine
    Famotidine is a medication that works to reduce the amount of acid produced by the stomach. This eMedTV article discusses the drug's effects, when and how to take it, and possible side effects. Famotadine is a common misspelling of famotidine.
  • Famotidin
    Famotidine is approved to treat conditions affecting the stomach, esophagus, and intestines. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Famotidin is a common misspelling of famotidine.
  • Famotidine
    Famotidine is an H2 blocker commonly used to treat heartburn, GERD, ulcers, and other digestive conditions. This eMedTV article provides a detailed look at the medication, including how it works, dosing information, and available strengths and forms.
  • Famotidine Information
    Heartburn, GERD, and ulcers are just a few of the conditions that can be treated with famotidine. This eMedTV selection offers more information on this drug, including how to use it, whether it is available without a prescription, and more.
  • Famotidine Side Effects
    While most people have no difficulties when taking famotidine, side effects are possible. This eMedTV page lists common side effects (like constipation and dizziness), as well as less common but serious side effects to look out for (such as seizures).
  • Famotodine
    Famotidine is a drug used to treat ulcers, heartburn, GERD, and other conditions. This eMedTV article lists the approved uses for both prescription and over-the-counter famotidine products. Famotodine is a common misspelling of famotidine.
  • Famvar
    Famvir is a prescription medicine used to treat genital herpes, shingles, and cold sores. This eMedTV segment explains how Famvir works and what you should discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Famvar is a common misspelling of Famvir.
  • Famvir
    Famvir is a prescription medication that is used for treating shingles, cold sores, and genital herpes. This eMedTV article describes the effects of Famvir, explains how the medicine works, and provides dosing tips and precautions for the drug.
  • Famvir for Herpes
    If you have recurring genital herpes, you may benefit from the antiviral drug Famvir. This portion of the eMedTV site discusses the benefits of this prescription drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Fanacia Gel
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Finacea gel is a prescription drug used to treat rosacea. This article takes a brief look at this medicine, including how it works and how often to use it. Fanacia gel is a common misspelling of Finacea gel.
  • Fanapt
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Fanapt to treat schizophrenia. This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers an overview of this medication, including how it works, dosing guidelines, general precautions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Fareston
    The prescription drug Fareston is approved to slow down the progression of certain types of breast cancer. This eMedTV page contains more details on several topics relating to this drug, including how it works, how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Fareston Chemotherapy Information
    Prior to starting chemotherapy with Fareston, your doctor will need information on your medical history. This eMedTV segment discusses other important details to discuss with your doctor. It also covers how the drug is taken and possible side effects.
  • Fasamx
    Fosamax is an osteoporosis drug that is available only by prescription. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Fasamx is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Faslodex
    Faslodex is a prescription medicine used to treat breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at the drug, explaining how it works to slow down cancer growth, tips on taking it, and possible side effects.
  • Faslodex Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Faslodex include nausea, headaches, and a sore throat. This eMedTV resource lists other common side effects of the drug, as well as some serious side effects to report to your doctor (like depression or allergic reactions).
  • Fasomax
    Available only by prescription, Fosamax is a drug used to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of the drug and also includes a link to more information. Fasomax is a common misspelling of Fosamax.
  • Fast Food and Obesity
    This eMedTV segment explains that although fast food is typically high in calories, it is not a cause of obesity. This page also discusses the research on fast food and obesity, explaining that not everyone who eats fast food becomes obese.
  • Fatel Alcohol Syndrome
    Fetal alcohol syndrome is directly associated with alcohol consumption during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page describes the condition and provides a link to more information. Fatel alcohol syndrome is a common misspelling of fetal alcohol syndrome.
  • FDA Warnings on Actiq
    This eMedTV page explains that the FDA issued a black box warning for Actiq (fentanyl lozenge) to inform the public of potentially serious and life-threatening complications of this drug. This article discusses how to use this pain medicine safely.
  • Feaver Blisters
    As explained in this eMedTV page, a fever blister is a small sore that often occurs outside the mouth on the lips, cheeks, chin, or in the nostrils. This article explains what causes them. Feaver blisters is a common misspelling of fever blisters.
  • Febral Seizure
    Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a fever in infants or small children. This eMedTV article talks about why these occur and provides a link to more detailed information. Febral seizure is a common misspelling of febrile seizures.
  • Febrile Seizures
    Febrile seizures are convulsive attacks brought on by fever in small children or infants. As this eMedTV article explains, these seizures are not considered a form of epilepsy and do not cause brain damage.
  • Febuxostat
    Febuxostat is a prescription medicine licensed for the prevention of gout attacks. This eMedTV Web segment explains what you should know before taking this medication, describes the effects of the drug, and offers general dosing information.
  • Feeding Amounts for Infants
    Depending on the age of your infant, feeding amounts and recommended foods will vary. As this eMedTV article explains, at four to six months of age, your child should start eating two to three teaspoons of iron-fortified infant cereal twice a day.
  • Feeding Schedule for Babies
    For babies, feeding schedules may change frequently. As this eMedTV article explains, due to the tiny size of their bellies, the feedings will start out small but frequent; as they grow, they will need longer individual feeding sessions further apart.
  • Feeding Solid Foods to Infants
    As this eMedTV article explains, the first solid foods to feed infants should be those that are easily digested and least likely to trigger an allergic reaction. The article talks about the process of introducing your baby to solid foods.
  • Felbamate
    A doctor may prescribe felbamate to treat partial seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This page of the eMedTV site offers an in-depth look at this drug, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Felbatol
    Felbatol is a drug prescribed to treat partial seizures in adults and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in children. This eMedTV page offers a detailed overview of this medicine, including information on how it works, general dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Felbatol and Breastfeeding
    In general, women should avoid using Felbatol (felbamate) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web article explains why most healthcare providers will not recommend this drug while nursing and describes the potentially serious problems it may cause.
  • Felbatol Medication Information
    Felbatol is an epilepsy medicine prescribed for partial seizures and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. This eMedTV page provides some important information on this medication, including potential side effects, as well as some safety precautions to be aware of.
  • Felbatol Overdose
    As with many medications, it is possible to take too much Felbatol (felbamate). This eMedTV Web segment discusses what to expect with a Felbatol overdose, including information on how a healthcare provider will treat any symptoms that occur as a result.
  • Felbatol Side Effects
    Insomnia, heartburn, and vomiting are some of the most common Felbatol side effects. This eMedTV Web resource further describes other problems reported with the drug, including other common side effects and those that require immediate medical care.
  • Felbitol
    Felbatol is a prescription seizure medicine used to treat specific types of seizures in adults and children. This eMedTV page describes these particular uses and lists potential side effects of the drug. Felbitol is a common misspelling of Felbatol.
  • Feldene
    A prescription drug, Feldene is used to relieve symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV page describes what to tell your doctor before taking Feldene, how and when to take the drug, and Feldene dosing.
  • Feldene Medication
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents some basic information on Feldene, a product used to treat certain kinds of arthritis. This page describes possible side effects of the medication, treatment guidelines, and more.
  • Feldine
    This eMedTV page talks about the prescription drug Feldene, which relieves symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This page explains how Feldene works and lists symptoms that it treats. Feldine is a common misspelling of Feldene.
  • Felodapine
    As this eMedTV page explains, felodipine is a prescription drug that can help to lower blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels. This page offers a brief overview of dosing tips and side effects. Felodapine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodipin
    Felodipine is a medication used for treating high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Felodipin is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodipine
    Felodipine is a medicine that is prescribed for treating high blood pressure. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how felodipine works, lists potential side effects of the drug, and offers information on when and how to take the medication.
  • Felodipine Medication
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at felodipine, a medication used to help lower blood pressure. This segment explains how it works, lists possible side effects, and addresses a couple of safety concerns, with a link to even more information.
  • Felodipine Side Effects
    Headaches, flushing, and dizziness are some of the most common side effects of felodipine. This eMedTV article lists other common side effects, as well as potentially serious side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Felodopine
    This eMedTV article explains that felodipine works to treat high blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels. This page also covers some general dosing guidelines and lists possible overdose symptoms. Felodopine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodpine
    Felodipine is a drug commonly used to relax the blood vessels and lower blood pressure. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug, including dosing and possible side effects. Felodpine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felopidine
    Felodipine, a prescribed drug used to treat high blood pressure, works by relaxing the blood vessels. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug and provides some general dosing guidelines. Felopidine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Fem hrt
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of femhrt, a prescription drug approved to treat menopausal symptoms and prevent osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This page also covers some general precautions. fem hrt is a common misspelling of femhrt.
  • Fem Ring
    This eMedTV Web page explains that a doctor may prescribe Femring to treat menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal problems. This page also offers a link to more information. Fem Ring is a common misspelling of Femring.
  • Female Anatomy
    The anatomy of a woman's reproductive system is designed to provide nourishment for the fetus in the womb. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of the various parts of the female anatomy and how they relate to childbirth.
  • Female Levitra
    This eMedTV resource explains that because of the way in which the drug works, only men should take Levitra; females would likely obtain little, if any, benefit from it. This page describes how Levitra works and links to information on the drug's uses.
  • Female Menopause
    As this eMedTV segment explains, menopause is associated with lower levels of female hormones (estrogen and progestin) in a woman's body. This article defines menopause and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Female Viagra
    Viagra is only approved for men; there is no version of a female Viagra available at this time. This eMedTV resource explains how this medication works to increase blood flow to the penis. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Femara
    Femara is a drug used to treat specific types of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at the prescription medicine, noting in particular how it works, when and how to take it, and its potential side effects.
  • Femara 2.5 Mg Tablets
    Several different factors determine the dose of Femara you are prescribed. However, as this eMedTV resource explains, many people start with 2.5-mg Femara tablets. This page also offers a few tips to ensure the effectiveness of this medication.
  • Femara and Weight Gain
    Up to 11 percent of people who take Femara experience weight gain. This portion of the eMedTV archives lists some things you can try if you're on Femara and weight gain occurs (such as limiting your alcohol intake and eating heart-healthy foods).
  • Femara for Breast Cancer
    The prescription drug Femara is used for breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This selection from the eMedTV site describes the different types of breast cancer this medicine can treat and how it works, and links to more information on this product.
  • Femara for Infertility
    Women who are having trouble conceiving may be prescribed Femara in an "off-label" fashion. This eMedTV article explains when doctors may recommend treating infertility with Femara and the advantages the product may have over other infertility drugs.
  • Femara Side Effects
    Some common Femara side effects include nausea, dizziness, and weight gain. This eMedTV article lists other common side effects of Femara, as well as some serious side effects to report to your doctor (like chest pain or difficulty breathing).
  • Femcon Fe
    Femcon Fe is an oral contraceptive that comes in the form of a chewable tablet. This eMedTV Web article provides an overview of Femcon Fe, including information on how it works, dosing tips on when and how to take it, and some general precautions.
  • Femcon Fe Birth Control Pills
    This segment of the eMedTV library takes a look at Femcon Fe, explaining how it is unique compared to other birth control pills, how this drug works, and common side effects. There is also a link to a full-length article on this topic.
  • Femcon Fe Side Effects
    Nausea, headaches, and bladder infections are among the common side effects of Femcon Fe. This eMedTV resource discusses these and other side effects in more detail, including a list of side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Femera
    Femara is licensed to treat specific forms of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a brief overview of the drug and includes a link to more detailed information. Femera is a common misspelling of Femara.
  • Femera vs. Clomid
    This eMedTV page offers a brief comparison of Femara vs. Clomid as infertility treatments. This article discusses the effectiveness of both drugs and provides a link to more information. Femera vs. Clomid is a common misspelling of Femara vs. Clomid.
  • Femhart
    femhrt is a prescription medication that may relieve menopause symptoms and prevent osteoporosis. This eMedTV Web page lists some common side effects of femhrt and offers a link to more information. femhart is a common misspelling of femhrt.
  • Femhrt
    femhrt is a prescribed drug that may alleviate menopausal symptoms and prevent osteoporosis. This eMedTV Web resource provides an overview of femhrt, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and some general precautions.
  • Femhrt Side Effects
    Headaches, nausea, and breast pain are among the most commonly reported side effects of femhrt. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other femhrt side effects that may occur, including those that are serious and require prompt medical care.
  • Femora
    Femara may be prescribed to postmenopausal women with certain types of breast cancer. This eMedTV article covers Femara side effects, precautions, and warnings -- and links to more detailed information. Femora is a common misspelling of Femara.
  • Femring
    Femring is a prescription estrogen medication used to treat menopausal symptoms. This eMedTV page explains how Femring is used vaginally to treat hot flashes, night sweats, and vaginal problems. This page also covers dosing tips and side effects.
  • Femtrace
    Femtrace is licensed to treat menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes and night sweats. This eMedTV Web article offers a complete overview of this drug, including information on how it works, potential side effects, and tips on when and how to take it.
  • Fenegriek
    Fenugreek may help treat several conditions, such as high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of fenugreek, including possible side effects and general precautions. Fenegriek is a common misspelling of fenugreek.
  • Fenergan
    Phenergan is often prescribed for the treatment of nausea or vomiting. This eMedTV article discusses other approved uses, describes this drug in more detail, and explains how often it is generally taken. Fenergan is a common misspelling of Phenergan.
  • Fengreek
    As this eMedTV page explains, many people may try fenugreek to treat certain conditions (such as high cholesterol). This page also discusses some safety precautions to be aware of with this supplement. Fengreek is a common misspelling of fenugreek.
  • Fenofibrat
    Fenofibrate is used to decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the body. This selection from the eMedTV library gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Fenofibrat is a common misspelling of fenofibrate.
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