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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Equipment Failure During Angioplasty - Exubera and Blood Sugar

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Equipment Failure During Angioplasty to Exubera and Blood Sugar. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Equipment Failure During Angioplasty
    Equipment failure during angioplasty is extremely rare, as this eMedTV article explains. When medical equipment does fail, the complications are usually minor and can be treated easily by your doctor.
  • Equipment Failure During Atherectomy
    Equipment failure during atherectomy is always a possibility. However, as this segment of the eMedTV archives explains, this is extremely rare. Equipment is regularly tested and meets strict FDA requirements.
  • Erbitux and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Erbitux (cetuximab) recommends that breastfeeding women avoid this drug. This eMedTV article explains why and discusses the risks the medicine may present to a nursing infant, but urges women to discuss this with their doctor.
  • Erbitux and Lung Cancer
    Can lung cancer be treated with Erbitux? This eMedTV selection provides the answer and also offers a link to more in-depth information on the various uses for this prescription anti-cancer drug.
  • Erbitux and Pregnancy
    The Food and Drug Administration considers Erbitux (cetuximab) a pregnancy Category C drug. This eMedTV article describes the results of animal studies that led to this classification and explains when Erbitux may still be given to a pregnant woman.
  • Erbitux and Radiation
    In certain cases, a person's cancer treatment will combine Erbitux and radiation. This selection from the eMedTV archives describes when this combination is given, the effects it may have on cancer, and the drug's limitations.
  • Erbitux Chemotherapy Information
    This eMedTV article provides some basic information on Erbitux, a chemotherapy drug used to treat two specific types of cancer. This segment outlines these uses, describes what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and links to more information.
  • Erbitux Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that when treating cancer with Erbitux, dosing starts at 400 mg per meter squared for the first week, followed by 250 each week thereafter. This page also has tips to ensure the safety and effectiveness of each dose.
  • Erbitux Drug Interactions
    At this time, there are no known drug interactions with Erbitux; however, as this eMedTV selection explains, interactions could be discovered at a later date, so it is always good to review your medications with your healthcare provider.
  • Erbitux Mode of Action
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site describes the mode of action for Erbitux, a drug used to treat certain kinds of cancer. This page explains how this medication works and includes a link to a full-length article on this medication.
  • Erbitux Overdose
    There are no reported cases of an actual overdose with Erbitux (cetuximab); however, as this eMedTV page explains, when two and a half times the usual dose was given, no serious effects occurred. The risks an overdose could present are also discussed.
  • Erbitux Side Effects
    Because Erbitux is likely to cause side effects, this eMedTV segment lists some of the most common ones reported in clinical trials, like skin reactions and weight loss. It also describes problems that require medical care, like infusion reactions.
  • Erbitux Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, Erbitux can be used alone or in combination with other drugs to treat advanced colorectal cancer and cancer affecting the head and neck. This segment explains how this drug works and discusses off-label uses as well.
  • Erbitux Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page explains why, during treatment with Erbitux, you need to limit your time in the sun and wear sunscreen and protective clothing when you do go outside. Other important Erbitux precautions and warnings are also included.
  • Erbutux
    Erbitux is an anti-cancer medication given by a process called infusion. This eMedTV resource explains what this means and lists the conditions this drug is approved to treat. Erbutux is a common misspelling of Erbitux.
  • ERCP
    This multimedia clip explains in detail what happens during an ERCP.
  • ERCP - Presentation Summary
    This multimedia clip explains the purpose of an ERCP procedure.
  • ERCP Alternatives
    This video clip describes possible alternatives to ERCP.
  • ERCP Complications -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • ERCP Complications -- Major
    This multimedia clip outlines several major complications.
  • ERCP Complications -- Minor
    This multimedia clip introduces minor complications.
  • ERCP Risks -- Allergic Reaction To Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • ERCP Risks -- Bleeding
    This multimedia clip addresses bleeding, a complication that can occur with colonoscopy.
  • ERCP Risks -- Heart and Lung Problems
    This video clip discusses the risk of heart and lung problems occurring with this procedure.
  • ERCP Risks -- Infection
    This multimedia clip explains possible infections that may occur during this procedure.
  • ERCP Risks -- Pancreatitis
    This multimedia video discusses pancreatitis -- a common complication with this procedure.
  • ERCP Risks -- Perforations
    This multimedia clip describes the risk of perforation occurring with this procedure.
  • ERCP Risks as a Diabetic
    This video clip explains some of the health risks associated with diabetes.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation
    This video clip describes an ERCP with balloon dilation procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation -- Major Complications
    This multimedia clip outlines several major complications.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation -- Minor Complications
    This multimedia clip introduces minor complications.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation -- Other Risks
    This multimedia clip describes major complications that can occur with this procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation and Stent Placement -- Presentation Summary
    This multimedia clip explains the purpose of an ERCP procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Complications -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Allergic Reaction To Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Bleeding
    This multimedia clip addresses bleeding, a complication that can occur with colonoscopy.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Heart and Lung Problems
    This video clip discusses the risk of heart and lung problems occurring with this procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Infection
    This multimedia clip explains possible infections that may occur during this procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Pancreatitis
    This multimedia video discusses pancreatitis -- a common complication with this procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks -- Perforations
    This multimedia clip describes the risk of perforation occurring with this procedure.
  • ERCP With Balloon Dilation Risks as a Diabetic
    This video clip explains some of the health risks associated with diabetes.
  • ERCP With Sphincterotomy
    This interactive video describes an ERCP with sphincterotomy.
  • ERCP With Sphincterotomy - Presentation Summary
    This multimedia clip explains the purpose of an ERCP procedure.
  • ERCP With Sphincterotomy -- Before Your Procedure
    This video explains what you need to do before your procedure.
  • ERCP With Sphincterotomy Risks -- Final Thoughts
    This video clip discusses the likelihood of complications occurring with your procedure.
  • Erectile Dysfunction and Problems With the Urinary Tract
    Autonomic diabetic neuropathy can also affect the sex organs and urinary tract. Nerve damage may cause the bladder to not empty fully, which can lead to urinary tract infections or even urinary incontinence. It can also gradually decrease sexual response, leading to erectile dysfunction (impotence) in men and vaginal dryness or problems reaching orgasm in women.
  • Eribulin Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that the guidelines for dosing with eribulin will vary for each person, depending on things such as your body surface area. This article also provides some important tips about when and how to receive your infusion.
  • Eribulin Medication Information
    Eribulin is a prescribed medication used to treat breast cancer when other chemotherapy has failed. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on eribulin, explaining the drug's dosing schedule, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Erivedge
    Erivedge is a medicine prescribed to treat certain types of basal cell carcinoma. This eMedTV Web selection features an overview of this chemotherapy drug, with information on how it works, dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Erivedge and Breastfeeding
    Women who are taking Erivedge (vismodegib) are generally advised to avoid nursing. This eMedTV segment explains why taking Erivedge while breastfeeding may lead to potentially serious complications and discusses what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Erivedge and Pregnancy
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, Erivedge (vismodegib) could cause dangerous problems in a fetus, which is why women must take several precautions to prevent pregnancy while taking Erivedge and for several months after the last dose.
  • Erivedge Dosage
    This eMedTV article discusses the dosing instructions for Erivedge, including when and how to most effectively take these capsules. This page also offers some tips on whether you should take the drug with food and explains when treatment ends.
  • Erivedge Drug Interactions
    Celexa, torsemide, and propranolol are among the many drugs that can interact with Erivedge. This eMedTV segment examines other products that may interfere with Erivedge and explains how to minimize your risk for potentially serious complications.
  • Erivedge Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Erivedge for the treatment of basal cell carcinoma in adults. This eMedTV resource offers some basic information on Erivedge, including how this medication is taken and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Erivedge Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that although there have not been any reports of an Erivedge (vismodegib) overdose, it is possible that someone could take too much of this drug. This article describes possible overdose symptoms and treatment options.
  • Erivedge Side Effects
    Most people who take Erivedge will develop some type of reaction to the drug. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at the Erivedge side effects that were reported during clinical trials, including common and potentially serious problems.
  • Erivedge Uses
    Adults with certain types of basal cell carcinoma may receive treatment with Erivedge. This page of the eMedTV Web site focuses on what Erivedge is used for, how it works to interfere with cancer cell growth, and whether children can use it.
  • Erivedge Warnings and Precautions
    Erivedge may not be safe for pregnant or breastfeeding women. This page of the eMedTV Web library features other warnings and precautions for how to take Erivedge safely, with more information on what your doctor needs to be aware of prior to treatment.
  • Erlotinib Dosage
    In many cases, the recommended dose of erlotinib for non-small cell lung cancer is 150 mg a day. This eMedTV Web article outlines specific dosing guidelines for this prescription drug and explains how to get the most out of each dose.
  • Erlotinib Dosing
    As this eMedTV article points out, the dosing guidelines for erlotinib vary based on how you respond to it, among other factors. This segment takes a quick look at when and how to take this drug, including what should be avoided during treatment.
  • Erlotinib Medication Information
    Erlotinib is a drug used to treat late-stage pancreatic cancer and non-small lung cancer. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of this medication, with information on how to take it and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Erlotinib Side Effects
    As this page from the eMedTV site explains, common side effects of erlotinib include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This resource offers a more detailed list of reactions to this cancer drug, including information on how often they occurred in studies.
  • Errin Birth Control Pills
    This page of the eMedTV archives takes a look at the birth control pill Errin, with information on the women it is designed for, how effective it is, side effects, and safety precautions. There is also a link to a detailed article on this medication.
  • Errin Dosing
    It is important to take Errin every day, at the same time each day. As this eMedTV resource explains, your risk of pregnancy increases if you do not follow Errin dosing guidelines carefully. This article explains what to do if you miss any doses.
  • Erythromicin
    The antibiotic erythromycin has been approved to treat a wide range of conditions. This page of the eMedTV library lists some of these infections and discusses possible side effects of the drug. Erythromicin is a common misspelling of erythromycin.
  • Erythromycin and Breastfeeding
    Most doctors consider erythromycin safe while breastfeeding (although the manufacturers doesn't recommend it). This eMedTV article explains that this is because the drug is often given directly to infants and only causes problems in rare cases.
  • Erythromycin and Pregnancy
    In general, women who are pregnant can take erythromycin without causing any harm to the fetus. This eMedTV page, however, explains that while animal studies suggest that the drug is safe, problems cannot be ruled out and a doctor should be consulted.
  • Erythromycin Drug Interactions
    Several different drugs can interact with erythromycin, such as warfarin, digoxin, and statins. This page of the eMedTV site provides a more complete list of medicines that can react with erythromycin and explains the problems that can occur as a result.
  • Erythromycin Oral
    There are topical, injectable, and oral forms of erythromycin. This selection from the eMedTV site provides important information for when this drug is taken orally, including when and how to take it and tips to ensure a safe, effective treatment process.
  • Erythromycin Overdose
    While the medicine is not particularly toxic, an erythromycin overdose could still be dangerous. This page of the eMedTV archives describes the effects that could occur with an overdose, such as diarrhea, and explains the available treatment options.
  • Erythromycin Pills
    Erythromycin is available in many different forms, including pills, capsules, and ointments. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this medication, including how it works and general dosing recommendations, with a link to more information.
  • Erythromycin Warnings and Precautions
    In rare cases, erythromycin has been known to cause liver damage or myasthenia gravis. This eMedTV segment provides other warnings and precautions with erythromycin to be aware of, including a list of people who should avoid the drug.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide
    Erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a drug that is prescribed to treat acne. This eMedTV Web resource offers an in-depth look at this medication, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the standard dose of erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a thin layer applied to the affected area twice daily. This page explains why it may take six to eight weeks for this drug to work and lists other important dosing tips.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Gel
    Available as a skin gel, erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a prescription acne medication. This eMedTV segment discusses how this medicine works, possible side effects, and dosing information. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Information
    Erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide is a prescription medicine used to treat acne. This page of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide, explaining how the drug works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Erythromycin/Benzoyl Peroxide Side Effects
    Red, itchy, and dry skin are some of the most common side effects of erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide. This eMedTV segment further explores possible side effects, including statistics on how often they occur and when to contact your healthcare provider.
  • Escitalopram Dose
    This eMedTV article explains that, for the treatment of depression or generalized anxiety disorder, an escitalopram dose may range from 10 mg to 20 mg once daily. This page also lists the recommended starting escitalopram dosage (10 mg once daily).
  • Escitalopram Uses
    Escitalopram is used to treat depression and generalized anxiety disorder. This eMedTV page also covers off-label escitalopram uses (such as treating migraines or personality disorders) and explains that the drug is not approved for use in children.
  • Escitalopran
    Escitalopram is a prescription drug approved for treating depression and generalized anxiety disorder. This eMedTV page offers more details on escitalopram and its uses, effects, and side effects. Escitalopran is a common misspelling of escitalopram.
  • Esmolol and Breastfeeding
    It is currently unknown whether esmolol passes through breast milk in humans. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at breastfeeding and esmolol, and explains whether problems are likely to occur if the drug does pass through breast milk.
  • Esmolol and Pregnancy
    Esmolol may not be safe for use in women who are expecting. This article from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on pregnancy and esmolol, and describes the results of animal studies and limited human experience with the medication.
  • Esmolol Dosage
    Typically, dosing for esmolol is started with one or more "loading doses." As this eMedTV page explains, this dosage is given over 30 to 60 seconds and is meant to rapidly control the heart rate. After this dose, a continuous infusion is started.
  • Esmolol Drug Information
    As this eMedTV resource explains, esmolol is a drug used when fast, temporary treatment is needed for certain medical conditions. This segment has information on the uses for this medication, how it is given, and what to tell the doctor administering it.
  • Esmolol Overdose
    Taking an overdose of esmolol may result in congestive heart failure, cardiac arrest, or breathing problems. This eMedTV resource lists other potential overdose effects and describes various treatment options that are available for an overdose.
  • Esomeprazol
    As this eMedTV page explains, esomeprazole is a prescription medication used to treat several conditions related to stomach acid. This page offers an overview of dosing tips and side effects. Esomeprazol is a common misspelling of esomeprazole.
  • Esomeprazole Dosing
    As this eMedTV resource explains, when erosive esophagitis is treated with esomeprazole, dosing guidelines usually call for taking 20 mg or 40 mg daily for 4 to 8 weeks. This article also looks at esomeprazole dosage guidelines for other conditions.
  • Esomeprazole Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions may occur when esomeprazole is taken with such medications as digoxin and diazepam. This segment discusses other possible drug interactions with esomeprazole, such as those involving warfarin.
  • Esomeprazole Overdose
    If a person overdoses on esomeprazole, he or she may experience symptoms such as headache and nausea. This eMedTV segment lists other symptoms that may result from an esomeprazole overdose and explains the general treatment of such an overdose.
  • Esomeprazole Precautions and Warnings
    As outlined in this eMedTV segment, esomeprazole precautions and warnings include such things as limiting your daily dose of the drug if you have severe liver disease. Other precautions and warnings for esomeprazole users involve breastfeeding.
  • Esomeprazole Side Effects
    In the case of esomeprazole, side effects that may occur include such things as headache and nausea. This eMedTV article discusses some of the possible side effects of esomeprazole, such as diarrhea, dry mouth, and constipation.
  • Esomeprazole Uses
    When it comes to esomeprazole, uses of the drug include such things as treatment of erosive esophagitis. This eMedTV resource discusses other uses for esomeprazole, such as treating gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and H. pylori infections.
  • Esomeprozole
    Esomeprazole is a medicine prescribed to treat conditions like GERD and erosive esophagitis. This eMedTV page takes a look at esomeprazole, including possible side effects and general dosing tips. Esomeprozole is a common misspelling of esomeprazole.
  • Estarylla
    Estarylla is a type of oral contraceptive (birth control pill), as this eMedTV article explains. This resource examines this product, including information on dosing instructions, possible side effects, safety issues, and more.
  • Estarylla Birth Control Information
    Estarylla is used primarily to prevent pregnancy. More information is given in this eMedTV article, including details on how this birth control pill is taken, how it works, and possible side effects. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Estarylla Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, there is only one standard dosage of Estarylla -- one pill each day, taken at the same time each day. This article presents more details on how to take this birth control pill most effectively.
  • Estarylla Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Estarylla include changes in sex drive, bloating, and breakthrough bleeding. This eMedTV page describes other reactions with this birth control pill, listing common problems as well as those that are potentially serious.
  • Estazolam Dosing
    For most people, estazolam dosing usually starts at 1 mg at bedtime. As this eMedTV segment explains, however, your doctor may increase your dose to 2 mg if necessary or may lower the dose for elderly people or those with other health concerns.
  • Estazolam for Insomnia
    As this eMedTV resource explains, estazolam is used for insomnia that occurs on a short-term basis. This segment discusses this topic in more detail, with a link to learn even more about its approved use.
  • Esterified Estrogens Dosage
    The recommended esterified estrogens dosage for treating breast cancer symptoms is 10 mg three times daily. This eMedTV page also offers esterified estrogens dosing guidelines for the treatment of menopause symptoms and hormone deficiency.
  • Esterified Estrogens Information
    Do you need information on esterified estrogens? This eMedTV article is a great place to start. It lists the different uses for this medication, briefly discusses how long treatment lasts, and explains what to tell your doctor before taking it.
  • Estrace Alternatives
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, Estrace alternatives include other conventional medications, coping strategies, and natural remedies. This page also describes what to do if Estrace is not working for you or if it is causing bothersome side effects.
  • Estrace and Breastfeeding
    The hormones in Estrace (estradiol) do pass through breast milk in small amounts. This eMedTV article explains that if you are taking Estrace and breastfeeding at the same time, the medication may affect the quality and quantity of your breast milk.
  • Estrace and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains why women are recommended to avoid Estrace during pregnancy. Estrace is considered a Category X drug and may cause problems for the fetus. Also, there is no legitimate reason for pregnant women to use this drug.
  • Estrace Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the recommended Estrace dosage is based on several factors, such as how you respond to Estrace and the condition being treated. This page also offers general Estrace dosing guidelines for treating several conditions.
  • Estrace Drug Interactions
    When you take certain other medications with Estrace, drug interactions can occur. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at the medications that may negatively interact with Estrace and describes the possible problems these interactions can cause.
  • Estrace Overdose
    This eMedTV segment explains that an overdose of Estrace may cause nausea, vomiting, and vaginal bleeding. This article also describes what to do in the case of an Estrace overdose, and covers the possible treatment options that are available.
  • Estrace Uses
    This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at several Estrace uses, such as treating menopausal symptoms and preventing osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. This page also describes other conditions Estrace can be used for, including off-label uses.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream and Breastfeeding
    Estrace Vaginal Cream (estradiol vaginal cream) is usually not recommended for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV article explains why breastfeeding women should avoid this product and offers more information on Estrace Vaginal Cream and breastfeeding.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream and Pregnancy
    Estrace Vaginal Cream (estradiol vaginal cream) is not approved for use in pregnant women. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Estrace Vaginal Cream and pregnancy, and explains why the drug is not recommended for pregnant women.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Dosage
    The recommended Estrace Vaginal Cream dosage is 2 to 4 grams of cream inserted vaginally once daily. As this eMedTV page explains, your doctor may reduce your Estrace Vaginal Cream dosing to 1 gram three times weekly if you respond well to the drug.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Drug Interactions
    Grapefruit juice, cyclosporine, and barbiturates may cause Estrace Vaginal Cream drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists other products that may interact with Estrace Vaginal Cream and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Information
    Are you looking for information on Estrace Vaginal Cream? Check out this eMedTV segment. It provides a brief overview of this drug, including specific menopause symptoms it treats, basic dosing guidelines, and what to tell your doctor before using it.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Overdose
    An Estrace Vaginal Cream (estradiol vaginal cream) overdose may cause vaginal bleeding, nausea, or vomiting. This eMedTV article further explores the effects of an Estrace Vaginal Cream overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Side Effects
    Common Estrace Vaginal Cream side effects include fluid retention, spotting, and cramps. This eMedTV resource lists other side effects seen with estrogen medications and explains which side effects of Estrace Vaginal Cream require medical attention.
  • Estrace Vaginal Cream Uses
    Estrace Vaginal Cream is used for treating vaginal symptoms in postmenopausal women. This page from the eMedTV library discusses Estrace Vaginal Cream uses in more detail and explains how the drug works to relieve vaginal menopause symptoms.
  • Estraderm Patch Information
    Are you looking for information on the Estraderm patch? This eMedTV Web page takes a look at this product, which has recently been discontinued by the manufacturer. This segment explains why and includes a link to learn more.
  • Estramustine for Prostate Cancer
    A doctor may prescribe estramustine to adult men with prostate cancer. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at using estramustine for prostate cancer treatment, including how this chemotherapy drug works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Etodlac
    As this eMedTV page explains, etodolac is a medicine used to reduce pain, swelling, inflammation, and stiffness. This page discusses how etodolac works and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Etodlac is a common misspelling of etodolac.
  • Etodolak
    This eMedTV Web article offers an overview of etodolac, a drug used to reduce pain, inflammation, and stiffness. This page also discusses some general precautions to be aware of before taking the drug. Etodolak is a common misspelling of etodolac.
  • Etopaside
    As this eMedTV segment explains, adults who have certain types of lung cancer or testicular cancer may benefit from etoposide. This page covers specific uses and lists some of the potential side effects. Etopaside is a common misspelling of etoposide.
  • Etopaside Injection
    A doctor may prescribe etoposide injection to treat lung cancer or testicular cancer. This eMedTV resource looks at this chemotherapy drug, including how it is given and side effects. Etopaside injection is a common misspelling of etoposide injection.
  • Etopophos
    People who have lung cancer or testicular cancer may receive the drug Etopophos. This eMedTV Web selection presents more detailed information on this medicine, including how it works, how it is administered, possible side effects, and more.
  • Etoposid
    Etoposide is prescribed for people who have small cell lung cancer or testicular cancer. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at this prescription drug, including specific uses and possible side effects. Etoposid is a common misspelling of etoposide.
  • Etoposid Injection
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, adults who have lung cancer or testicular cancer may receive treatment with etoposide injection. This page describes dosing and important safety issues. Etoposid injection is a common misspelling of etoposide injection.
  • Etoposide 100 Mg Injection
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, a healthcare provider may prescribe 100 mg of etoposide injection for treating certain types of cancer. This article takes a closer look at dosing information for this drug and offers a link to more details.
  • Etoposide Chemo Drug
    As this eMedTV page explains, etoposide is a drug that can help treat certain types of cancer. This article explains the specific uses for this chemotherapy drug and also provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Etoposide Mechanism of Action
    As this eMedTV segment explains, etoposide works to treat certain types of cancer by interfering with how cancer cells divide. This article looks at etoposide's mechanism of action to slow down the growth of cancer cells. It also links to more details.
  • Etoposide Phosphate
    Etoposide phosphate works to treat certain types of cancer by preventing cancer cells from dividing. This eMedTV resource features an overview of this prescription drug, including the type of cancers it is used to treat, dosing information, and more.
  • Etoposide Side Effects
    If you develop fever, seizures, or an infection while using etoposide, call your doctor right away. This eMedTV segment contains an in-depth list of etoposide side effects, with statistics on how often these problems occurred during clinical trials.
  • Etoposide VP-16
    Also known as VP-16, etoposide is a type of chemotherapy drug used to treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV resource contains details on what this prescription medicine is used for and provides a link to more information on side effects and dosing.
  • Eulexin Manufacturer
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, brand-name Eulexin is no longer manufactured. This segment explains why, lists a couple manufacturers of the generic version, and includes a link to a detailed article on this prescription drug.
  • Everlimus
    As explained in this eMedTV article, everolimus is prescribed to treat certain cancers, as well as to prevent kidney transplant rejection. This page offers dosing tips and possible side effects. Everlimus is a common misspelling of everolimus.
  • Everolimus and Delayed Wound Healing
    If you are taking everolimus, you may notice delayed wound healing. This page from the eMedTV Web library briefly discusses how it may take longer for wounds to heal while taking this medicine and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Everolimus Side Effects
    People taking everolimus may experience side effects such as diarrhea, fatigue, and nausea. This eMedTV Web selection offers a detailed list of other reactions that might occur with this drug, including serious problems that require medical care.
  • Exercice-Induced Asthma
    Exercise-induced asthma is triggered by physical activity. This eMedTV article lists common symptoms of exercise-induced asthma and explains how to prevent these symptoms. Exercice-induced asthma is a common misspelling of exercise-induced asthma.
  • Exercise and Chronic Pain
    Having chronic pain means exercise is out of the question, right? Wrong! Check out this eMedTV page for tips on how people with chronic pain can get moving again. We discuss how to find a suitable activity, why you may want to enlist a partner, and more.
  • Exercise Information
    Looking for some general information on exercise? This segment of the eMedTV library has you covered. We talk about the benefits of walking -- a cheap and easy way to get in shape -- and also take a look at the basics of cardiovascular exercise.
  • Exersise-Induced Asthma
    Exercise-induced asthma is characterized by airways that are sensitive to physical activity. This eMedTV page explains when symptoms occur and lists some possible symptoms. Exersise-induced asthma is a common misspelling of exercise-induced asthma.
  • Exersize-Induced Asthma
    People with exercise-induced asthma often experience coughing and wheezing during physical activity. This eMedTV page lists how to prevent exercise-induced asthma symptoms. Exersize-induced asthma is a common misspelling of exercise-induced asthma.
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