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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Dolobid Dosage - Doxepin Dosing

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Dolobid Dosage to Doxepin Dosing. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Dolobid Dosage
    This eMedTV page provides the starting Dolobid dosage for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and also gives tips on taking the drug. For example, the starting dose for mild to moderate pain is 1000 mg, followed by 500 mg every 12 hours.
  • Dolobid Drug Interactions
    Advil, Aleve, and Neoral are a few drugs that can potentially interact with Dolobid. As this eMedTV page explains, drug interactions can alter the levels of medication in the blood and make some drugs less effective, among other things.
  • Dolobid Medicine
    Though not a cure, Dolobid can help reduce pain due to rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis. This eMedTV Web page offers some details on this pain medicine, explaining how Dolobid works and listing important dosing guidelines.
  • Dolobid Precautions and Warnings
    Dolobid may cause serious side effects, such as liver damage. This eMedTV segment talks about the warnings and precautions with Dolobid, including things to tell your doctor before taking it, as well as people who shouldn't take the drug at all.
  • Dolobid Side Effects
    Headache, diarrhea, and nausea are common side effects of Dolobid. This eMedTV page also lists rare side effects, like anemia, and serious side effects that could signify a heart attack in some people taking the drug, such as chest pain.
  • Dolobid Uses
    This eMedTV page lists common Dolobid uses, such as relieving symptoms of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, as well as pain due to muscle strain. This page also covers uses for the drug in children and off-label uses, like treating migraines.
  • Dolor en el Área de la Incisión
    Dolor en el Área de la Incisión
  • Doloxatine
    Duloxetine is a prescription drug that is approved to treat depression, anxiety, and other conditions. This eMedTV resource explains how duloxetine works and covers some things to tell your physician. Doloxatine is a common misspelling of duloxetine.
  • Domiana
    Damiana is supposedly used to treat a wide variety of conditions. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of this herbal supplement and includes a link to more information. Domiana is a common misspelling of damiana.
  • Don't Blame Yourself
    Parents of naturally good eaters often assume that parents of picky eaters are doing something wrong. But the truth is children seem to have a natural tendency to be either adventurous eaters or picky eaters, irrespective of whatever their parents do or do not do. Ignore the critics (or if you are feeling charitable, thank them for their "kind" advice), and don't let them get you down.
  • Don't Drink Your Calories
    Water, unsweetened tea or coffee, and "diet" drinks are all good choices for people with diabetes. If you can't stand the idea of giving up your juice, full-sugar soda, or sugary coffee drink, commit to making the switch for a certain period of time (say, a week or two). You just might surprise yourself as you become accustomed to less sweetness in your beverages.
  • Don't Forget the Fat
    Forget all that nonsense you may have heard that fat is bad for you. Too much fat is bad for you. But, like carbs, your body needs some fat to function properly. Fat helps regulate your appetite, increases brain function, and stabilizes mood. The key is to pick healthy fats. Good choices include avocados, olive oil, salmon, and nuts.
  • Don't Forget the Vitamin D
    Your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. While your skin makes vitamin D from the sun, it's usually not enough -- especially in certain areas of the country or during the winter months, when the sun is nowhere to be found. Many people need to get their vitamin D from food (such as fatty fish and fortified milk) or supplements. The recommended daily vitamin D intake varies with age, but most people need 400 to 1000 international units (IU) a day.
  • Don't Get Stuck on Baby Food
    It's perfectly fine to start your baby on commercially prepared baby foods and snacks, but you'll want to transition to "regular" food after a while. Within reason, your baby can eat much of what you are eating, as long as there are no allergy or choking hazard concerns. Most foods can simply be mashed or ground to the right texture, providing baby with a broader experience in terms of flavor and content. For instance, there is nothing magical about jarred baby food bananas. A mashed-up banana is much fresher and less expensive and allows for a broader range of texture. Plus, it takes no effort at all to prepare.
  • Don't Give Up on Your New Year's Resolutions
    Are you struggling with your New Year's resolutions? Don't give up! This article on the eMedTV site provides information that you can use to stick to your goals and achieve them. In addition, it describes a study that explored this very topic.
  • Don't Go Overboard With Sugar-Free Candy
    We can be thankful for the brilliant scientific minds that have created sugar substitutes without horrible aftertastes, but, as anyone who has overindulged can confirm, eating too much sugar-free candy can cause some very unpleasant side effects. This is particularly true of products with "sugar alcohols," which can cause gas, bloating, and diarrhea if consumed in excess. But a small taste now and then can be just what you need to satisfy that sweet tooth.
  • Don't Keep It a Secret
    When speaking with your conventional healthcare providers, it's easy to keep quiet about the alternative treatments you're trying. You may be afraid they will be angry, dismissive, or condescending. But it is important, for the sake of a well-rounded and safe treatment regimen, to discuss all treatments, alternative or not. You may or may not disagree with your healthcare provider's attitude toward alternative medicine, but for safety's sake, don't keep quiet.
  • Don't Pick the 'Easy' Doctor
    Every town has one (or several), and it's not hard to find them. They're the prescribers who are "loose" with prescribing narcotics. Obviously, these doctors are the favorites of people with dishonest motives, but they also become the favorites of people with genuine chronic pain. They may be less judgmental, and they may make fewer demands of their patients (for instance, they may never require drug testing). But no matter how real your pain and how careful you are about narcotics, if you choose to see the "easy" doctor, it will make me suspicious.
  • Don't Put Off Those Doctor Visits
    While it may be natural to try to dismiss urinary problems as just a sign of aging, don't ignore the symptoms of an enlarged prostate. Although this condition is not curable, many things can be done to help improve symptoms. If you have signs of an enlarged prostate, such as a weak urine stream, trouble starting a urine stream, or urinating frequently, talk to your healthcare provider about your treatment options. Don't wait until it's too late -- the earlier you catch these problems, the easier they will be to treat!
  • Don't Worry About Sweetness
    Well-meaning "experts" have long suggested starting with the less tasty baby foods like vegetables and meats before moving on to the sweet and delicious fruits. However, this advice fails to appreciate two very important points. First, humans are biologically programmed to love and seek out sweet foods. Delaying their introduction isn't going to make your child like them any less. Second, breast milk is very sweet, so breastfed babies have already been consuming a steady diet of sweetness since the very start. In addition, starting solids is a new experience for your baby, and you don't want to start off the process with a food that is not palatable.
  • Donepezil
    As this eMedTV article explains, donepezil is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat symptoms of mild, moderate, or severe Alzheimer's disease. This page explains how donepezil works and discusses its effects, dosing information, and side effects.
  • Donepezil HCl
    Healthcare providers often prescribe donepezil hydrochloride (HCl) as a treatment for Alzheimer's. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of this drug, with details on side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Donepezil Side Effects
    Common side effects of donepezil may include dizziness, insomnia, and nausea. This eMedTV page provides a list of other potential side effects, including rare but possible problems and serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Door wie worden medische onderzoeken betaald?
    Medische onderzoeken worden gesponsord door allerlei organisaties en personen, zoals: * Artsen * Medische instellingen * Stichtingen * Vrijwilligersorganisaties * Producenten van medische hulpmiddelen * Farmaceutische bedrijven.
  • Doosh
    About 37 percent of American women ages 15 to 44 douche regularly. But, as this eMedTV segment explains, douching can make a woman more prone to bacterial infections or have problems getting pregnant. Doosh is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Dooshing
    Many doctors do not recommend douching, as it may change the chemical balance in the vagina. This eMedTV Web segment describes the process of douching and discusses the problems it may cause. Dooshing is a common misspelling of douching.
  • Doral
    Doral is a medication that is prescribed to treat insomnia. This article from the eMedTV library describes the effects of Doral, provides general dosing information for the drug, and explains what you should know before taking the sleep medicine.
  • Doral Abuse
    Doral abuse may potentially occur if the drug is taken in high doses for a long period of time. This eMedTV page lists other risk factors for Doral abuse and explains what withdrawal symptoms may occur if people who are addicted stop taking the drug.
  • Doral and Alcohol
    You should not take Doral and alcohol together because they are both CNS depressants. As this eMedTV resource explains, drinking alcohol while taking Doral can increase your risk of side effects, including dizziness, drowsiness, and memory problems.
  • Doral and Breastfeeding
    Women should avoid using Doral while breastfeeding because the drug passes through breast milk. This eMedTV article further explores the link between Doral and breastfeeding, and explains what side effects may occur in a nursing infant.
  • Doral and Pregnancy
    Doral and pregnancy appears to be a dangerous combination. As this eMedTV page explains, taking the drug early in pregnancy may increase the risk of birth defects and taking it late in pregnancy could cause withdrawal symptoms in a newborn.
  • Doral Dosage
    When treating insomnia, most people start with a daily Doral dosage of 7.5 mg (taken at bedtime). This page of the eMedTV archives contains other Doral dosing information, including precautions and tips for those taking the sleep medication.
  • Doral Drug Information
    Available by prescription only, Doral is a medication used to treat insomnia. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides more information on this drug, including how it works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Doral Drug Interactions
    When seizure medications, barbiturates, or narcotics are taken with Doral, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment contains a list of other drugs that may interact with Doral and describes the potential effects of combining these medicines.
  • Doral Overdose
    Confusion, drowsiness, and coma are commonly reported symptoms of a Doral overdose. This article on the eMedTV Web site further describes the potential dangers of a Doral overdose and lists the treatment options that are available.
  • Doral Side Effects
    Common Doral side effects can include dry mouth, headache, and indigestion or heartburn. This eMedTV Web page lists other common side effects of the drug and describes potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical attention.
  • Doral Uses
    Doral is commonly used for treating insomnia in adults. This section of the eMedTV Web site offers more information on what Doral is used for, explains whether the drug is used in children, and lists possible "off-label" Doral uses.
  • Doral Warnings and Precautions
    Since Doral is a controlled substance, it has the potential to be abused. This eMedTV article includes other important Doral warnings and precautions people should be aware of, including information on who should not take the sleep medication.
  • Dorex
    Doryx is a prescription medicine used for treating and/or preventing various types of infections. This eMedTV segment covers specific Doryx uses, explains how the drug works, and lists some potential side effects. Dorex is a common misspelling of Doryx.
  • Dornase Alfa
    Dornase alfa is a drug used to improve lung function in people with cystic fibrosis. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at the drug, explaining how it works, possible side effects, tips and precautions for those taking it, and more.
  • Dornase Alfa -- Cystic Fibrosis Medication
    This eMedTV article describes how dornase alfa can help improve lung function in people with cystic fibrosis. This resource gives an overview of this cystic fibrosis medication, with information on how it works, side effects, and more.
  • Dornase Alfa Dosing
    Certain factors can affect the dose of dornase alfa that is prescribed, as this eMedTV page explains. General dornase alfa dosing guidelines are also provided, as are helpful tips and suggestions for those taking the drug to treat cystic fibrosis.
  • Doryx
    Doryx is a prescription antibiotic licensed to treat and/or prevent a number of infections. This eMedTV Web page discusses the drug's uses in more detail, describes how it works, and explains what side effects may occur with treatment.
  • Doryx 100 mg Tablets
    People who have been exposed to anthrax generally take a 100 mg Doryx tablet twice daily for 60 days. This eMedTV resource also offers Doryx dosing guidelines for the treatment of bacterial infections and for the prevention of malaria.
  • Doryx 150 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available, 150 mg Doryx tablets are the highest strength. This eMedTV resource lists other strengths available for this medication and explains how Doryx dosing works for both adults and children.
  • Doryx 75 mg Tablets
    There are currently three different strengths available for Doryx tablets (75 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg). This eMedTV article offers Doryx dosage guidelines for the treatment and prevention of various conditions and explains how dosing works for children.
  • Doryx Dosage
    The recommended dosage of Doryx for preventing malaria in adults is 100 mg daily. This eMedTV resource also explains how dosing works for children and includes dosing guidelines for the treatment of bacterial infections and anthrax infections.
  • Doryx Drug Interactions
    If Doryx is taken in combination with warfarin, penicillin, or retinoids, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV article lists other medicines that may interfere with Doryx and describes the potential risks of these drug interactions.
  • Doryx for Acne
    Many doctors may treat acne with the prescription antibiotic Doryx. This eMedTV page offers information on how this drug works for controlling severe acne and explains how Doryx may be better tolerated than other antibiotics approved for this use.
  • Doryx Medication Information
    Doryx is a prescription drug approved to treat and prevent different types of infections. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on Doryx, including details about the medication's specific uses and dosing guidelines.
  • Doryx Side Affects
    Potential side effects of Doryx include loss of appetite, diarrhea, and nausea. This eMedTV page also lists potentially serious side effects of the drug that may require medical attention. Doryx side affects is a common misspelling of Doryx side effects.
  • Doryx Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Doryx include loss of appetite, yeast infections, and diarrhea. This eMedTV article lists other possible side effects, including potentially serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Doryx Tablets
    Doryx is an oral antibiotic used for treating certain infections, such as anthrax. This eMedTV Web page offers information on when and how to take the tablets and explains how Doryx works to inhibit the growth of bacteria.
  • Doryx Uses
    Doryx is approved for the treatment and/or prevention of a number of different infections. This eMedTV page discusses the uses of Doryx in more detail (including off-label uses) and describes how this antibiotic works to inhibit the growth of bacteria.
  • Doryx Warnings and Precautions
    To avoid damage to the esophagus while taking Doryx, take the drug with plenty of fluids. This eMedTV segment offers more warnings and precautions with Doryx, including information on what side effects or complications may occur with this medication.
  • Dorzolamide
    If you have high eye pressure, your healthcare provider may prescribe dorzolamide eye drops. This eMedTV page offers more details on how this product works to lower eye pressure and gives a general overview of side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Dorzolamide Dosage
    The usual dosage of dorzolamide is one drop in the affected eye(s) three times daily. This eMedTV resource further explains the dosing guidelines for the eye drops, including what your doctor may recommend if you are not getting the desired results.
  • Dorzolamide Drug Information
    Dorzolamide is a prescription eye drop used to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV selection provides more information on the drug, with details on how and when to take it. A link to more information on the medicine is also included.
  • Dorzolamide Eye Drops
    Available as an eye drop, dorzolamide is a medicine used to lower eye pressure. This eMedTV article briefly describes the drug and explains how it works. A link to more detailed information on dorzolamide is also included.
  • Dorzolamide HCL
    If you have high eye pressure, your healthcare provider may prescribe dorzolamide hydrochloride (HCl). This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of these eye drops, explaining how to use them and listing some potential side effects.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol
    Dorzolamide/timolol is commonly prescribed for the treatment of glaucoma and intraocular hypertension. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed look at this prescription medicine, with information on dosing, side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol Dosage
    There are no extenuating factors that affect the dose of dorzolamide/timolol a person is prescribed. This eMedTV resource explains why, describes when and how to use this eye drop, and offers a few guidelines that ensure a safe, effective treatment.
  • Dorzolamide/Timolol Drug Information
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides some important information on dorzolamide/timolol, a drug used to decrease pressure in the eye. This page briefly explains how this medicine works and what to tell the healthcare provider prescribing it.
  • Dosage for MSM
    A safe and effective dosage for MSM is not known at this time. This page from the eMedTV library explains what MSM doses were used in clinical trials and offers information on how to find a reliable product from a reputable manufacturer.
  • Dosage of Ezetimibe
    The recommended dosage of ezetimibe is 10 mg once daily. This eMedTV page lists some general tips for people taking ezetimibe (for example, the importance of using ezetimibe in combination with lifestyle changes like weight loss, diet, and exercise).
  • Dosage of Fentanyl Patch for Chronic Pain
    Your fentanyl patch dosage for treating chronic pain will depend on the type and severity of your pain. This eMedTV article describes other factors that may affect your dosage of this skin patch. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Dosage of Motrin
    For most people, the recommended dosage of Motrin for the relief of acute pain is 200 mg every 4-6 hours. This eMedTV resource also offers dosage guidelines for children and dosing suggestions for treating arthritis symptoms and menstrual pain.
  • Dosage of Oseltamivir
    The recommended starting dosage of oseltamivir is usually 75 mg, twice a day, for five days. This eMedTV Web page talks about the different dosages of this drug and also lists factors (such as age or medical history) that can affect your dosage.
  • Dosage of Penicillin to Treat Strep Throat
    The standard recommended dosage of penicillin to treat strep throat in adults is 500 mg. This page from the eMedTV Web library provides more dosing guidelines for this antibiotic, including dosing recommendations for children.
  • Dosage of Sildenafil Citrate
    The starting dosage of sildenafil citrate is 50 mg one hour before sexual activity. This eMedTV page also lists the maximum recommended sildenafil citrate dose (100 mg) and factors that can affect your dosage (such as other drugs you may be taking).
  • Dosage of Tadalafil
    Tadalafil comes in tablet form and can be taken prior to sexual activity or on a once-daily basis. This eMedTV Web page covers the dosing guidelines for tadalafil, including the factors that can affect the dose your healthcare provider recommends.
  • Dosage of Vardenafil
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended starting dosage of vardenafil is 10 mg one hour before sexual activity. This page lists factors that can affect your dosage (like other drugs you may be taking) and some general information on dosing.
  • Dosage of Venlafaxine
    The starting dosage of venlafaxine for treating depression is 75 mg daily. This eMedTV page lists factors that can affect your dosage (like other drugs you may be taking) and tips on taking the medicine (such as taking it at the same times each day).
  • Dosage With Metoprolol Tartrate
    For relieving angina symptoms, the suggested starting dosage with metoprolol tartrate is 50 mg twice daily. This eMedTV Web page also offers dosing recommendations for high blood pressure control and treatment following a heart attack.
  • Dose of Samsca for Hyponatremia
    The usual starting dose of Samsca for treating hyponatremia is 15 mg taken once daily. This eMedTV segment discusses how your individual dosage is determined and explains why you must start this drug in the hospital. It also links to more details.
  • Dosing for Ciprodex Drops
    The standard Ciprodex dosing amount is four drops into the infected ear twice daily for seven days. This eMedTV Web selection explains how this dosage is the same for everyone and discusses some important guidelines for using these drops.
  • Dosing for Ropinirole
    Dosing for ropinirole is determined by a doctor -- never adjust your dose unless specifically told to do so. This eMedTV page explains typical doses for ropinirole (although this varies for each patient). Tips on taking the medicine are also given.
  • Dosing of Propafenone
    This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at propafenone dosing for the treatment of certain heart rhythm problems. This page describes some of the factors that may affect your dosage and outlines the usual recommended starting amount for this drug.
  • Dosing With Biocef
    The dosage of Biocef for bacterial infections in adults ranges from 250 mg to 1000 mg. This eMedTV article lists factors that can affect dosing with Biocef and provides information on doses for infections and bacterial endocarditis.
  • Dosing With Candesartan-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV article explains that for people with high blood pressure, a common starting dose of candesartan-hydrochlorothiazide is 16 mg/12.5 mg once a day. This page also covers general guidelines for dosing with candesartan-hydrochlorothiazide.
  • Dosing With Cefdinir
    When dosing with cefdinir, the recommendation is 300 mg, taken twice a day, or 600 mg, taken once a day. This eMedTV segment offers dosage guidelines for children and contains helpful tips and precautions for those taking the drug.
  • Dosing With Cholestyramine
    Dosing with Cholestyramine usually starts at one packet or one level scoopful once or twice a day. This eMedTV resource also offers maintenance dosing suggestions, as well as tips, warnings, and precautions when taking the medicine.
  • Dosing With Colesevelam
    The recommended starting dose of colesevelam tablets is 1875 mg, taken twice a day with meals. This eMedTV article goes into greater detail about dosing with colesevelam, including information on factors that can affect your dosage.
  • Dosing With Colestipol
    Dosing with colestipol usually starts at 2 to 16 grams in tablets or 5 to 30 grams in granules. This eMedTV segment offers other important dosing information, including tips and precautions for taking the medicine.
  • Dosing With Desloratadine
    For adults and children 12 years and over, the recommended desloratadine dosage is 5 mg once daily. As this eMedTV page explains, dosing with desloratadine depends on your age, the condition being treated, and any other drugs you're currently taking.
  • Dosing With Desloratadine and Pseudoephedrine
    This eMedTV Web page lists the starting doses of desloratadine and pseudoephedrine -- one tablet daily of the 24-hour dose or two tablets daily of the 12-hour dose -- as well as factors that can affect dosing with desloratadine and pseudoephedrine.
  • Dosing With Diclofenac Potassium
    As this eMedTV page explains, dosing with diclofenac potassium for rheumatoid arthritis symptoms starts at 50 mg taken three or four times daily. This page also lists the dosages for other conditions (like osteoarthritis) and some general dosing tips.
  • Dosing With Diclofenac Sodium
    The usual dose of diclofenac sodium for osteoarthritis is 100 mg to 150 mg daily. This eMedTV resource also gives the recommended dose for rheumatoid arthritis (150 mg to 200 mg daily) and offers general tips taking diclofenac sodium safely.
  • Dosing With Diclofenac Sodium Extended-Release
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is recommended that those with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis take 100 mg of diclofenac sodium extended-release per day. This page also offers general tips on dosing with diclofenac sodium extended-release.
  • Dosing With Donepezil
    Dosing with donepezil generally starts at 5 mg once daily. As this eMedTV page explains, however, your doctor may increase your dosage after four to six weeks. This page also provides information on when and how to take your donepezil dose.
  • Dosing With Etodolac
    For relieving acute pain, etodolac dosing generally starts at 200 mg to 400 mg every six to eight hours. This eMedTV page also contains dosing recommendations for treating arthritis symptoms and offers tips and precautions when taking the drug.
  • Dosing With Etodolac Extended-Release
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, dosing with etodolac extended-release generally ranges from 400 mg to 1000 mg daily to treat most arthritis symptoms. For juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, the dosage will be determined by the patient's weight.
  • Dosing With Fexofenadine
    As this eMedTV article explains, the usual recommended dose of fexofenadine for adults with allergies or chronic hives is 180 mg once a day or 60 mg twice a day. This article discusses dosing with fexofenadine for children, adolescents, and adults.
  • Dosing With Fexofenadine and Pseudoephedrine
    As this eMedTV article explains, dosing with fexofenadine and pseudoephedrine can range from one to two tablets a day, depending on the drug's strength. This page provides dosing information and offers precautions and tips for taking the medicine.
  • Dosing With Fluvastatin
    This eMedTV article covers fluvastatin and the factors that will help determine your dosing. With fluvastatin, the dosage your doctor prescribes is based on factors such as your age, the condition being treated, and your cholesterol goal.
  • Dosing With Gemfibrozil
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting dose of gemfibrozil is 600 mg twice a day. This article explores numerous considerations for dosing with gemfibrozil, including doses for people with severe kidney disease and factors that can affect dosing.
  • Dosing With Indomethacin
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the starting dosage of indomethacin for arthritis symptoms is 25 mg two or three times daily. This article describes dosing guidelines for several conditions and discusses when and how to best take the medication.
  • Dosing With Losartan-Hydrochlorothiazide
    This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at guidelines for dosing with losartan-hydrochlorothiazide. The recommended dosage will vary between 50 mg/12.5 mg and 100 mg/25 mg once a day. This page also discusses general dosing information.
  • Dosing With Lovastatin
    Adults typically start with a lovastatin dose of 20 mg; 10 mg to 20 mg is recommended for children. As this eMedTV page explains, depending on whether cholesterol goals are reached or if side effects occur, dosing can be adjusted accordingly.
  • Dosing With Meloxicam
    As this eMedTV article explains, dosing with meloxicam starts at 7.5 mg once daily for the treatment of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. This page also discusses meloxicam dosing for the treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Douch
    Reducing odors and avoiding STDs are among the reasons why many women choose to douche. This eMedTV article gives a general overview of douching, which is a method of rinsing or cleaning out the vagina. Douch is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Douche
    Many women choose to douche, but research shows that women who do so are more prone to infections. This eMedTV article explains this method of cleaning the vagina and discusses why doctors do not recommend it.
  • Douching
    Douching is common among women, but research shows that it can lead to a chemical imbalance in the vagina. This eMedTV segment explains how this practice makes women more prone to vaginal infections and offers tips on cleaning the vagina.
  • Dousch
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a douche is a method of cleaning out the vagina by squirting water or other solutions into it. This page also provides information about the reasons why some women douche. Dousch is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Doush
    Due to the vagina's sensitive chemical balance, it is better to let it clean itself than to douche. This eMedTV article discusses how common the practice is and reasons why some women may do it. Doush is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Doushe
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains why many healthcare providers do not recommend for women to douche. This page also explains how douching can cause bacterial infections and fertility problems. Doushe is a common misspelling of douche.
  • Doushing
    Douching is a process of cleaning or rinsing out the vagina. This eMedTV page offers an overview of douching, including information on what is involved in this process and why many doctors do not recommend it. Doushing is a common misspelling of douching.
  • Dovenex
    People with plaque psoriasis may be prescribed Dovonex, which comes as a cream or a liquid. This eMedTV resource provides a brief overview of this drug, with information on side effects and safety precautions. Dovenex is a common misspelling of Dovonex.
  • Dovonex
    Dovonex is a prescription drug approved for the treatment of plaque psoriasis. This segment of the eMedTV library describes the different forms of this medicine, how it is used, possible side effects, what to tell your doctor before using it, and more.
  • Dovonex Medication Information
    Dovonex is often prescribed to treat a certain type of psoriasis. This page of the eMedTV Web site provides important information on the medication Dovonex, including the different forms and what to tell your doctor before beginning treatment.
  • Down Sendrome
    About 1 out of 800 babies are born with the Down syndrome. This eMedTV Web page explains what causes this genetic disorder and describes common characteristics of the condition. Down sendrome is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Down Sindrom
    Down syndrome is a condition caused by the presence of an additional 21st chromosome. This eMedTV resource explains why this happens and describes treatment options for the disorder. Down sindrom is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Down Sindrome
    Down syndrome is a genetic disorder that causes mental retardation. This page on the eMedTV site discusses the causes of this condition and describes available treatment options. Down sindrome is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Down Syndrom
    Down syndrome is a condition that is often associated with mental retardation. This eMedTV Web page explores the causes of this condition and lists medical problems often associated with it. Down syndrom is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Down Syndrome
    Often associated with mental retardation, Down syndrome is a condition occurring in 1 out of 800 live births. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at Down syndrome, including symptoms, risk factors, and treatment options.
  • Down Syndrome Babies
    Hypotonia (poor muscle tone) is often present in Down syndrome babies and can cause problems with feeding. This eMedTV segment explains some of the other more common health problems faced by these babies and offers sources of help.
  • Down Syndrome Diagnosis
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains processes used to make a Down syndrome diagnosis. Tests used include amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, and percutaneous umbilical blood sampling, as well as a chromosomal karyotype.
  • Down Syndrome Effects
    Common Down syndrome effects include mental retardation, thyroid problems, and eye problems. This eMedTV article discusses these and other possible effects of Down syndrome, such as hearing problems and congenital heart disease.
  • Down Syndrome Information
    This eMedTV segment talks about Down syndrome, a genetic disorder that often results in developmental delays. Causes, treatment, and prognosis are discussed, and a link to more detailed information on Down syndrome is provided.
  • Down Syndrome Prognosis
    In most cases, a person's Down syndrome prognosis is favorable, with patients living into their 50s. As this eMedTV article explains, however, various factors can affect a Down syndrome prognosis, such as heart or joint problems.
  • Down Syndrome Research
    This eMedTV Web page discusses current areas of Down syndrome research. For example, research is being conducted on new prenatal diagnostic techniques and medical treatments using amino acid supplements for children with the disorder.
  • Down Syndrome Risk
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the risk for Down syndrome increases if one of the parents is a balanced translocation carrier. This article provides details on other risk factors for this condition, such as maternal age.
  • Learn About Down Syndrome Symptoms
    Common symptoms of Down syndrome include poor muscle tone, a short neck, and a flat facial profile. This eMedTV page lists other characteristics of Down syndrome, as well as symptoms of conditions associated with this developmental disorder.
  • Down Syndrone
    Down syndrome is often characterized by mental retardation and certain facial features. This eMedTV resource lists other conditions associated with this disorder and explains why it occurs. Down syndrone is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Down Syndroom
    Down syndrome is a disorder caused by a genetic problem related to chromosome 21. This eMedTV resource lists some of the medical problems that may be associated with this condition. Down syndroom is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downsindrom
    Down syndrome is a disorder that occurs when an additional 21st chromosome is present. This eMedTV segment explains why this condition occurs and discusses the prognosis of affected people. Downsindrom is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downsindrome
    Down syndrome is the most frequent genetic cause of mental retardation. This part of the eMedTV library explains what causes this syndrome and lists some of its common characteristics. Downsindrome is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downssyndrome
    Down syndrome is a genetic disorder that results in developmental delays. This eMedTV article lists medical conditions related to Down syndrome and explores the life expectancy for the disorder. Downssyndrome is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downsyndrome
    Down syndrome is a disorder that occurs as a result of extra genetic material. This eMedTV Web page further explores the causes of Down syndrome and lists risk factors for the condition. Downsyndrome is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downsyndrone
    Down syndrome, a condition associated with mental retardation, is caused by an extra chromosome 21. This eMedTV page further explains why this condition occurs and lists associated symptoms. Downsyndrone is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Downsyndroom
    Down syndrome is a condition caused by an additional chromosome 21. This page from the eMedTV site further explores the causes of this condition and lists characteristics associated with it. Downsyndroom is a common misspelling of Down syndrome.
  • Doxacycline
    Doxycycline is a common medication used to treat various bacterial infections. This page of the eMedTV Web site briefly describes the drug's effects, side effects, and forms. Doxacycline is a common misspelling of doxycycline.
  • Doxacycline Uses
    Doxycycline is used for treating various bacterial infections, as well as acne. This eMedTV page lists infections the drug can treat and describes limitations when using it in children. Doxacycline uses is a common misspelling of doxycycline uses.
  • Doxapin
    Doxepin is a type of antidepressant that is available by prescription. This part of the eMedTV library briefly covers how doxepin works, describes the effects of the drug, and lists potential side effects. Doxapin is a common misspelling of doxepin.
  • Doxazosin
    Doxazosin may be prescribed to lower high blood pressure and treat an enlarged prostate. This eMedTV resource provides an in-depth look at the drug, including how it works, possible side effects, general dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Doxazosin Mesylate
    Doxazosin mesylate is a drug used to treat hypertension and an enlarged prostate. This eMedTV Web resource briefly describes this medicine, exploring how it works and some of the factors that will affect your dose.
  • Doxazosin Side Effects
    Some of the most common side effects of doxazosin include dizziness, a general ill feeling, and drowsiness. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious side effects, such as an allergic reaction and fainting.
  • Doxcil
    Doxil is a chemotherapy drug used for certain types of cancer, including multiple myeloma. This eMedTV segment takes a quick look at this medication and provides a link to more detailed information. Doxcil is a common misspelling of Doxil.
  • Doxcycline
    This eMedTV segment examines doxycycline, an antibiotic used to treat various infections. This page discusses how the medicine works and lists some specific infections that it is prescribed to treat. Doxcycline is a common misspelling of doxycycline.
  • Doxepin
    Doxepin is a medication that can be prescribed for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and insomnia. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at the medication, including a description of how it works and a list of potential side effects.
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