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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Diagnosing Hemorrhoids - Diclofenac Sodium Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Diagnosing Hemorrhoids to Diclofenac Sodium Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Diagnosing Hemorrhoids
    To make a hemorrhoids diagnosis, your doctor will ask several questions and perform a physical exam. This eMedTV segment describes the process of diagnosing this condition, including information on other medical conditions with similar symptoms.
  • Diagnosing Hepatitis A
    The procedure used when diagnosing hepatitis A consists of a physical exam, often followed by certain tests. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed look at the process, including a list of symptoms and medical conditions with similar symptoms.
  • Diagnosing Hepatitis B
    This eMedTV page covers the steps involved in diagnosing hepatitis B (such as taking the medical history). This page also explains that the doctor will consider other conditions that can share similar symptoms with hepatitis B before making a diagnosis.
  • Diagnosing Hepatitis D
    A hepatitis D diagnosis begins with taking the patient's medical history and performing a physical exam. This eMedTV article describes other tests a doctor may use as part of diagnosing hepatitis D (for example, liver enzyme tests).
  • Diagnosing Herpes Zoster
    This eMedTV page lists tests that a doctor may use in diagnosing herpes zoster (such as a physical exam or blood test). This article also explains why it's important to see your doctor no later than three days after the herpes zoster rash starts.
  • Diagnosing Hirschsprung's Disease
    Several tests are commonly used for diagnosing Hirschsprung's disease. As discussed in this eMedTV page, tests such as manometry, biopsy, and barium enema x-rays all assist a doctor when considering a Hirschsprung's disease diagnosis.
  • Diagnosing Hodgkin's Disease
    Diagnosing Hodgkin's disease may involve blood and imaging tests; however, as explained in this eMedTV resource, a biopsy is necessary to definitively diagnose Hodgkin's disease. This article also discusses tests used in staging the disease.
  • Diagnosing Huntington's Disease
    A doctor diagnosing Huntington's disease often begins with a review of the patient's medical history. This eMedTV article explains the steps involved in making a Huntington's disease diagnosis, which may also include genetic testing.
  • Diagnosing Hyperthyroidism
    As explained in this eMedTV page, diagnosing hyperthyroidism involves the use of tests that look at certain hormone levels in the blood. This article takes a closer look at how your healthcare provider will diagnose an overactive thyroid.
  • Diagnosing Hypothyroidism
    Symptoms alone are not enough to make a hypothyroidism diagnosis, so healthcare providers use certain tests. This eMedTV article describes these tests for hypothyroidism in detail, explaining what they check and what the readings mean.
  • Diagnosing Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
    This eMedTV segment explains how idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is diagnosed. This includes taking the patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, and ordering certain tests (the most common being the video-assisted thoracoscopy).
  • Diagnosing Impotence
    Diagnosing impotence often begins with the doctor asking questions about a man's medical history, lifestyle, and medications. This eMedTV article describes the methods physicians use when diagnosing impotence, such as blood tests and a physical exam.
  • Diagnosing Infectious Arthritis
    There is no single test that can confirm a diagnosis of infectious arthritis. As explained in this eMedTV resource, however, imaging tests, synovial fluid testing, and other tests can be helpful for doctors when considering this condition.
  • Diagnosing Insomnia
    This eMedTV page explains how a healthcare provider goes about making an insomnia diagnosis. For example, he or she will usually start by asking several questions about your lifestyle and may ask you to keep a sleep diary as well.
  • Diagnosing Interstitial Cystitis
    A cystoscopy done under anesthesia is the primary test used when diagnosing interstitial cystitis. This eMedTV page describes how doctors go about diagnosing the condition and lists disorders that share similar symptoms, which doctors must rule out.
  • Diagnosing Intestinal Gas
    To diagnose intestinal gas, your doctor may perform specific tests, such as a blood or breath test. This eMedTV segment explains the process of diagnosing intestinal gas. The process usually begins with ruling out other conditions.
  • Diagnosing Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    A colonoscopy and x-rays are some of the tests a doctor may use to diagnose irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This eMedTV page explains why it can be difficult to diagnose this digestive condition and describes other ways to determine if you have IBS.
  • Diagnosing Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV Web page describes the steps involved in diagnosing juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which may include certain blood tests, a physical exam, and x-rays. This article also explains why the disease can be so difficult to diagnose.
  • Diagnosing Klinefelter Syndrome
    Doctors may use blood tests or prenatal testing when making a diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome. As this eMedTV article explains, diagnosing Klinefelter syndrome can be difficult, because symptoms are not always apparent.
  • Diagnosing Lichen Sclerosus
    To diagnose lichen sclerosus, a biopsy is often performed, especially in early or mild cases of the disease. This eMedTV article explains the process doctors use when diagnosing lichen sclerosus.
  • Diagnosing Low Testosterone
    To accurately diagnose low testosterone levels, your healthcare provider will order certain blood tests. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at how this condition is best diagnosed and also describes some inaccurate methods that are unreliable.
  • Diagnosing Macular Degeneration
    When diagnosing macular degeneration, an eye care provider performs certain tests, including tonometry. As this eMedTV page explains, the provider will also ask about the patient's medical history. This page discusses macular degeneration diagnosis.
  • Diagnosing Male Incontinence
    To make an incontinence diagnosis, the healthcare provider will ask a number of questions and perform a physical exam. This eMedTV article discusses male incontinence in detail and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Diagnosing Measles
    When diagnosing measles, your doctor will perform a physical exam and ask about your medical history. This eMedTV page discusses tests that may be used and other conditions that a doctor will rule out before diagnosing measles.
  • Diagnosing Merkel Cell Carcinoma
    Diagnosing Merkel cell carcinoma usually requires a few different tests, which this eMedTV segment explains. Common tests include biopsy, skin exam, blood tests, and a CT scan.
  • Diagnosing MRSA
    As this eMedTV article explains, a doctor can make a MRSA diagnosis using various tests and procedures. This article takes a closer look at some of these tests used when diagnosing this condition, such as a physical exam and blood tests.
  • Diagnosing MS
    Since most people don't recognize the early symptoms of MS, making a diagnosis may be difficult. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed description of the tests used in diagnosing multiple sclerosis, such as blood tests, MRI, and spinal tap.
  • Diagnosing Multiple Sclerosis
    Certain tests can help diagnose multiple sclerosis, as this video clip explains.
  • Diagnosing Mumps
    A physical exam is just part of the process used when diagnosing mumps. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains in detail how doctors determine if a person has mumps, including tests that may be performed.
  • Diagnosing Narcolepsy
    Two tests commonly used in diagnosing narcolepsy are the polysomnogram and the multiple sleep latency test. This eMedTV Web page explains how these tests assist doctors in reaching a narcolepsy diagnosis.
  • Diagnosing Osteoarthritis
    A combination of methods and tests are involved when diagnosing osteoarthritis; there is no single test. This eMedTV page provides an in-depth look at the process doctors use when diagnosing this condition, such as a physical exam and x-rays.
  • Diagnosing Osteopenia
    As this eMedTV article explains, diagnosing osteopenia involves looking at a patient's risk factors, physical exam, and results from his or her bone density test. This page describes the bone density test and its role in diagnosing osteopenia.
  • Diagnosing Osteoporosis
    In most cases, an osteoporosis diagnosis will involve a bone mineral density test known as a DEXA test. This eMedTV article explains how this test is performed and also provides information on who should get tested.
  • Diagnosing Overactive Bladder
    When diagnosing overactive bladder, your doctor will ask about your symptoms, perform a physical exam, and possibly do some tests. This eMedTV discusses how overactive bladder is diagnosed and links to other articles about urinary incontinence.
  • Diagnosing Parkinson's Disease
    Making a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease can be difficult, especially in the early stages of the disease. This eMedTV page explains in detail how healthcare providers go about diagnosing this condition, including ruling out similar conditions.
  • Diagnosing Peyronie's
    When diagnosing Peyronie's disease, a physical exam is usually all that is required. This section of the eMedTV library discusses the process used in diagnosing Peyronie's and explains why a doctor might recommend an ultrasound scan of the penis.
  • Diagnosing Pheochromocytoma
    As explained in this eMedTV article, the process of diagnosing pheochromocytoma may begin with a physical exam and a review of the patient's medical history. This resource also provides a list of tests that are used to help diagnose this condition.
  • Diagnosing Pink Eye
    A pink eye diagnosis is typically made based on a physical exam and an analysis of symptoms. This eMedTV page lists the questions your doctor may ask when diagnosing this condition and describes the tests that are used to determine the cause.
  • Diagnosing Pituitary Tumors
    Diagnosing pituitary tumors usually involves blood tests to measure the levels of hormones in the blood. This eMedTV Web page explains how a pituitary tumor diagnosis is made, including information about tests and procedures involved in the process.
  • Diagnosing Pneumonia
    When diagnosing pneumonia, your doctor will need to listen to your lungs and ask several questions. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at how your healthcare provider will make the diagnosis, including the tests that may be used.
  • Diagnosing Polio
    When diagnosing polio, the doctor will ask a number of questions and order certain tests. This eMedTV article describes the process of making a polio diagnosis. This page also includes a list of diseases that are sometimes mistaken for polio.
  • Diagnosing Polymyalgia Rheumatica
    As this eMedTV page explains, diagnosing polymyalgia rheumatica usually involves taking the patient's medical history and performing certain tests, such as rheumatoid factor. This page covers the process of making a polymyalgia rheumatica diagnosis.
  • Diagnosing Premature Menopause
    Diagnosing premature menopause usually involves a review of symptoms, and in some cases, blood tests. This eMedTV article discusses blood tests used to diagnose premature menopause, which measure the level of hormones (such as estradiol) in the body.
  • Diagnosing Primary Biliary Cirrhosis
    This part of the eMedTV archives discusses a number of tests that a doctor may use as part of diagnosing primary biliary cirrhosis, such as a physical exam, liver enzyme test, tests that look at cholesterol levels, ultrasound, and liver biopsy.
  • Diagnosing Pulmonary Embolism
    As explained in this eMedTV article, tests that doctors use when diagnosing a pulmonary embolism can include a chest x-ray and pulmonary angiography. This page offers an in-depth look at these and other tools used to confirm a pulmonary embolism.
  • Diagnosing Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy
    This eMedTV page explains the process used when diagnosing reflex sympathetic dystrophy, including a description of common tests. The diagnostic process can be complicated because the symptoms are common -- and some people improve without treatment.
  • Diagnosing Rheumatoid Arthritis
    This eMedTV page lists some of the tools that healthcare providers use to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis, such as a medical history, laboratory tests, and x-rays. This article also looks at why the disease is difficult to diagnose in its early stages.
  • Diagnosing Venereal Warts
    A visual inspection is usually the best method for diagnosing venereal warts. This segment of the eMedTV library describes the tests that can be used to diagnose venereal warts and lists other conditions that share similar signs or symptoms.
  • Diagnosis of Hepatitis C
    Making a hepatitis C diagnosis requires a physical exam and obtaining confirmation with a viral RNA test. As this eMedTV article explains, it's also important to rule out similar conditions, like hemochromatosis, when diagnosing this condition.
  • Diagnosis of Leprosy
    As this eMedTV page explains, in order for a doctor to make a diagnosis of leprosy, a patient's symptoms, medical conditions, and medications are considered. This page also explains tests that confirm the diagnosis and factors that can cause delay.
  • Diagnosis of Smallpox
    As this eMedTV page explains, your healthcare provider can tell if you have smallpox by considering your medical history, physical exam, and test results. This article takes you through the process of diagnosing smallpox.
  • Diagnosis of Testicular Cancer
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, a testicular cancer diagnosis usually involves a review of the patient's medical history, a physical exam, and various tests and procedures, such as blood tumor marker tests.
  • Diagnosis of Turner Syndrome
    A diagnosis of Turner syndrome is made with certain blood tests and is often made during prenatal testing. This eMedTV resource explains how a diagnosis of Turner syndrome is made, including a description of a special blood test called a karyotype.
  • Diagnosis of Vibrio Cholerae
    As this eMedTV article explains, your doctor may perform a physical exam and look at a stool sample in order to make a diagnosis of Vibrio cholerae (the cause of cholera). This page discusses the process of making a Vibrio cholerae diagnosis.
  • Diagnostic Laparoscopy
    Several gynecological problems can be diagnosed (and sometimes treated) using diagnostic laparoscopy. This eMedTV page gives an overview of the procedure, including how it is performed and what you should know about complications.
  • Diaper Dermatitis
    Diaper dermatitis is a rash that occurs when the skin under the diaper is irritated from stool or urine. This eMedTV article explores other causes of this condition, explains what the rash looks like, and describes various treatment options.
  • Diaper Rash
    A diaper rash most often occurs when the skin covered by a diaper becomes irritated from stool or urine. This eMedTV article explains what these rashes look like, explores other causes, and offers detailed treatment and prevention information.
  • Diaper Rash and Blisters
    With a severe diaper rash, blisters may develop within the red area or on the outside of the main rash. This eMedTV segment describes other symptoms that may occur with severe diaper rashes and lists possible signs of a yeast diaper rash.
  • Diaper Rash and Bumps
    For more severe cases of diaper rash, bumps or pus-filled blisters may develop. This Web page found on the eMedTV site lists some of the common signs and symptoms of both irritant diaper rashes and yeast diaper rashes.
  • Diaper Rash Cream
    There are currently many different types of ointments and creams for diaper rash treatment. This article on the eMedTV Web site lists some of the skin products commonly used for treating diaper rashes and explains where you can find them.
  • Diaper Rash Creams and Ointments
    In order to treat a diaper rash, ointments and creams may be used to reduce irritation and act as a barrier. This eMedTV segment explains the difference between creams and ointments, and describes the various types of these skin products available.
  • Diaper Rash Cure
    The key in treating a diaper rash is to limit exposure to the irritant and give the skin time to heal. This eMedTV page further explains how to cure diaper rash and includes tips on minimizing moisture, friction, and irritation in the affected area.
  • Diaper Rash Help
    Most cases of diaper rash can be treated at home and do not require medical attention. This eMedTV resource provides information on when you may require help for diaper rash treatment and lists some standard home remedies.
  • Diaper Rash Information
    Diaper rashes occur when the skin area covered by the diaper becomes irritated. This segment from the eMedTV library contains more information about diaper rash, including the details about the causes, symptoms, and treatments for the condition.
  • Diaper Rash Prevention
    In order to prevent diaper rash, it is important to change diapers often and clean your baby's bottom well. This eMedTV resource provides a list of general warnings and precautions on how to minimize your child's risk for developing diaper rashes.
  • Diaper Rash Signs and Symptoms
    In most cases, a diaper rash is a flat, red rash within the diaper area. This page on the eMedTV site lists some of the signs and symptoms of a diaper rash infected with yeast and explains how an irritant rash may look in more severe cases.
  • Diaper Rash Treatment
    The key to effective diaper rash treatment is to decrease exposure to the irritant (urine and stool). This eMedTV Web page offers tips for keeping your child's bottom clean and dry, and explains when a diaper rash may require medical attention.
  • Diaper Rash Vs. Yeast Infection
    Yeast overgrowth is a common result of a simple diaper rash that has gotten worse due to lack of treatment. This eMedTV resource provides information about yeast infection vs. diaper rash and further explains why a yeast diaper rash occurs.
  • Diarea
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, diarrhea is defined as loose, watery stools that occur more than three times in a day. This page covers symptoms that can accompany diarrhea and how it can be treated. Diarea is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diareah
    Food intolerance and intestinal disease are among the things that can cause a person to have diarrhea. This eMedTV Web page defines diarrhea and discusses its types, causes, and treatment options. Diareah is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diareaha
    People with diarrhea may pass more than a quart of watery stool a day. This eMedTV resource explains how long diarrhea typically lasts and explores situations in which medical attention is needed. Diareaha is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diareha
    The average adult experiences diarrhea about four times a year. This eMedTV segment defines diarrhea and explains how it can be treated, as well as what to do if your child develops diarrhea. Diareha is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarehea
    Diarrhea is frequent loose or liquid bowel movements. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes the two different type of diarrhea and explores the possible causes of these problems. Diarehea is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarehia
    Diarrhea occurs when you have loose, watery stools more than three times in one day. This eMedTV article further describes this symptom, including what may cause it and when to contact your doctor. Diarehia is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarhea
    This page on the eMedTV site gives an overview of diarrhea, which is defined as loose, watery stools that occur more than three times in a day. This page also links to more information about diarrhea. Diarhea is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarhee
    This eMedTV page discusses diarrhea, a symptom that causes loose, watery stools that occur more than three times in one day. This page also covers when to seek medical attention and possible treatment options. Diarhee is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarhia
    People who have diarrhea have loose, watery stools that occur more than three times in one day. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at diarrhea, including what causes it and when to contact your doctor. Diarhia is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarreaha
    Diarrhea is defined as loose, watery stools occurring more than three times a day. This eMedTV page explains how long a bout of diarrhea lasts and when you should seek medical attention for the problem. Diarreaha is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarreha
    Diarrhea, defined as loose and watery stools, is caused by various viral and bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment explores other causes of diarrhea and explains when it may require medical attention. Diarreha is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarrehea
    Diarrhea is defined as loose, watery stools. This article from the eMedTV library describes the different types of diarrhea, explores the causes of this symptom, and explains when treatment is necessary. Diarrehea is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarrha
    Diarrhea is a symptom that causes loose, watery stools more than three times in one day. This eMedTV Web segment explains what may cause diarrhea and describes how this symptom may be treated. Diarrha is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarrhea
    Diarrhea is a symptom in which watery, loose stools occur more than three times a day. This eMedTV article presents an overview of diarrhea, including details about its possible causes, how it may lead to dehydration, and when to see a doctor for it.
  • Diarrhea Causes
    Viral infections, bacterial infections, and parasites can all cause diarrhea. This eMedTV article discusses these and other causes of the condition, such as Crohn's disease, lactose intolerance, and medications such as digoxin.
  • Diarrhea Cure
    In most cases, the best cure for diarrhea is time. However, as explained in this portion of the eMedTV archives, there is no cure when the problem is a result of Crohn's disease; the condition may cause intermittent diarrhea throughout a lifetime.
  • Diarrhea Diet
    For people trying to treat or prevent diarrhea, diet is an important consideration. This eMedTV segment provides dietary tips for people recovering from acute diarrhea and offers suggestions for preventing traveler's diarrhea when traveling abroad.
  • Diarrhea During Pregnancy
    If you are a pregnant woman who has diarrhea, it is important to avoid becoming dehydrated. This eMedTV resource explains why diarrhea may occur while you are expecting, and includes tips for avoiding dehydration in the event that it happens to you.
  • Diarrhea in Children
    Children can become dehydrated quickly when they have diarrhea, which may lead to serious health problems. This eMedTV article discusses diarrhea in children, including details about what may cause it and tips on how to identify signs of dehydration.
  • Diarrhea Symptoms
    When people have diarrhea, symptoms that may accompany it may include nausea, bloating, and fever. This eMedTV article identifies other symptoms that may occur along with diarrhea, including those that may indicate a serious health problem.
  • Diarrhea Treatment
    In many cases, treatment for diarrhea may only involve replacing lost fluids to prevent dehydration. This eMedTV resource discusses treating diarrhea caused by bacterial infections, medical conditions (such as celiac disease), and other problems.
  • Diarrhee
    People with diarrhea often have frequent, watery bowel movements. This eMedTV resource describes the two different types of diarrhea and explains what treatment options are available. Diarrhee is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarrhia
    Diarrhea (loose, watery stools) can be serious for babies and older people if lost fluids are not replaced. This eMedTV article explains what treatments are available for both acute and chronic diarrhea. Diarrhia is a common misspelling of diarrhea.
  • Diarrohea
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, diarrhea is another name for loose, watery stools. This article further describes this symptom, including possible causes and treatment options. Diarrohea is a common alternate spelling of diarrhea.
  • Diastat
    Diastat is a prescription drug that is used in combination with other medications to treat seizures. This eMedTV article discusses the drug in more detail, including information on how it works, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Diastat Rectal Gel
    Diastat rectal gel is a medication used to treat seizures. This eMedTV Web resource briefly describes this medicine, exploring how it works and some of the factors that will affect your dose. Also included is a link to more information.
  • Diastolic Blood Pressure
    Diastolic blood pressure, represented by the bottom number in a blood pressure reading, is when your heart is resting. This page of the eMedTV library explains diastolic blood pressure and offers tips for keeping it low.
  • Diavan
    This eMedTV page covers Diovan, a prescription drug that treats several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels (like high blood pressure). This page covers Diovan uses, dosing, and side effects. Diavan is a common misspelling of Diovan.
  • Diazapam
    If you have anxiety or muscle spasms, your doctor may prescribe diazepam. This page on the eMedTV site provides detailed information about this prescription drug, as well as a link to more information. Diazapam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazapam Dosage
    For people with anxiety, the diazepam dose is usually 2 mg to 10 mg two to four times daily. This eMedTV segment also discusses diazepam dosing in children and the elderly. Diazapam dosage is a common misspelling and variation of diazepam dosing.
  • Diazapem
    Diazepam is a medicine approved to treat numerous conditions, including anxiety and seizures. This eMedTV resource explores other diazepam uses and describes the effects of this drug. Diazapem is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazepam
    Diazepam is a prescription drug used to treat seizures, muscle spasms, anxiety, and other conditions. This eMedTV article provides more information about the uses and effects of diazepam, and also covers diazepam dosing guidelines and side effects.
  • Diazepam (Valium) Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers important information on diazepam (Valium), a drug used to treat conditions such as anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal. This page also explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone.
  • Diazepam 10 mg Tablets
    It is recommended that people experiencing alcohol withdrawal start with diazepam 10 mg tablets. This eMedTV page further explains how dosing works for this medicine and includes recommendations for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, and muscle spasms.
  • Diazepam 2 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for diazepam, 2 mg tablets are the lowest strength. This Web page found on the eMedTV site includes dosing guidelines for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal.
  • Diazepam 5 mg Tablets
    After an initial dose for treating alcohol withdrawal, most people are switched to diazepam 5 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource also provides dosing guidelines when using this drug for the treatment of anxiety, seizures, and muscle spasms.
  • Diazepam Dosing
    For most people with seizures, the diazepam dosage is 2 mg to 10 mg two to four times daily. This eMedTV Web page also lists dosages for the treatment of other conditions (such as muscle spasms) and covers diazepam dosing in children and the elderly.
  • Diazepam Medication Information
    Diazepam is used for treating anxiety, seizures, muscle spasms, and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV Web page offers more information about the prescription medication diazepam, including details on how the drug works and what side effects may occur.
  • Diazepam Oral
    Diazepam is a medication used to treat anxiety, seizures, and certain other conditions. As this eMedTV page explains, there are three different forms of diazepam: oral liquid, tablets, and injections. The drug is usually taken three or four times a day.
  • Diazepam Overdose
    Immediate medical attention is necessary for a diazepam overdose, as it may lead to serious complications. This eMedTV page lists possible overdose symptoms (such as confusion and drowsiness) and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • Diazepam Side Effects Information
    Shakiness and blurred vision are among the possible side effects of diazepam. This eMedTV resource lists both common and serious side effects and describes what to do if you have any serious side effects (such as hostility, aggression, or rage).
  • Diazepam Tablets
    Diazepam is a prescription benzodiazepine medication that comes in tablet, liquid, and injectable forms. This eMedTV segment lists the various strengths of diazepam tablets and offers general information on when and how to take this medicine.
  • Diazide
    Dyazide is a prescription drug used for water retention and high blood pressure. This segment of the eMedTV archives provides a brief look at the drug and includes a link to more information. Diazide is a common misspelling of Dyazide.
  • Diazipam
    People with muscle spasms or alcohol withdrawal symptoms may benefit from taking diazepam. This eMedTV resource provides a brief overview of this drug and offers a link to more information. Diazipam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Diazpam
    A doctor may prescribe diazepam to treat anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasms, or seizures. This eMedTV article discusses these and other uses of diazepam, as well as when and how to take the drug. Diazpam is a common misspelling of diazepam.
  • Dibetes
    People with diabetes often feel tired, hungry, and thirsty. This section of the eMedTV library explains why these symptoms of diabetes occur and why it is crucial to effectively manage diabetes. Dibetes is a common misspelling of diabetes.
  • Dibetes Insipidus
    Diabetes insipidus is a disease that occurs when the kidneys are no longer able to filter urine normally. This eMedTV article describes the symptoms and types of the disease. Dibetes insipidus is a common misspelling of diabetes insipidus.
  • Dibetes Type 1
    People with type 1 diabetes take insulin daily (it's not necessarily the case for people with other types). This eMedTV page briefly discusses the different types of diabetes. Dibetes type 1 is a common misspelling and variation of diabetes types.
  • Dibetic
    This eMedTV Web article explains what a person may experience if they have diabetes. This page provides a brief overview of this chronic condition, and offers a link to more detailed information. Dibetic is a common misspelling of diabetic.
  • Dibetic Diet
    This eMedTV page discusses the importance of maintaining a healthy diabetic diet in controlling blood sugar levels, as well as problems that can occur if blood sugar isn't adequately controlled. Dibetic diet is a common misspelling of diabetic diet.
  • Diclegis
    Diclegis is a drug approved to treat nausea and vomiting caused by pregnancy. This eMedTV segment explores several topics relating to this drug, including how it works, how it is taken, effectiveness, and more.
  • Diclfenac
    People experiencing pain or who have arthritis may benefit from the prescription drug diclofenac. As this eMedTV Web page explains, diclofenac products can be used to reduce pain and inflammation. Diclfenac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofemac
    Diclofenac is a pain medication also approved to treat arthritis, migraines, and actinic keratosis. This eMedTV resource describes various diclofenac products and offers general warnings for the drug. Diclofemac is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofen
    Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used to treat arthritis and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page covers other uses and explains how the medicine works to reduce pain and inflammation. Diclofen is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofena
    The prescription pain reliever diclofenac can also be used to treat arthritis and migraines. This eMedTV page describes diclofenac products in more detail and lists potential side effects of this drug. Diclofena is a common misspelling of diclofenac.
  • Diclofenac
    Diclofenac is a prescription medication licensed to treat migraines, pain, arthritis, and actinic keratosis. This eMedTV article covers the medicine's uses in more detail, explains how it works, and describes the various forms that this drug comes in.
  • Diclofenac 100 mg
    As this eMedTV segment explains, for relieving osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis symptoms, your healthcare provider may recommend 100 mg of diclofenac once a day. This article briefly explains how dosing works for this medication.
  • Diclofenac 75 mg
    People being treated for pain often end up taking 75 mg of diclofenac (25 mg four times daily). This eMedTV article explores other approved diclofenac uses and explains how dosing works for the treatment of these other conditions.
  • Diclofenac Dangers
    Diclofenac products may not be safe for people who are allergic to aspirin or other NSAIDs. This eMedTV resource discusses other possible dangers of diclofenac use and lists some of the potentially serious side effects that may occur with this drug.
  • Diclofenac Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended dose of oral diclofenac for pain relief is 50 mg three times daily or 25 mg four times a day. This article also offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of arthritis, migraines, and other conditions.
  • Diclofenac Drug Information
    Diclofenac is a prescription medicine used to treat pain, arthritis, and other conditions. In this eMedTV page, you will find more information about the drug, including details on diclofenac's other approved uses and general dosing information.
  • Diclofenac Effects
    Diclofenac is a medication that is beneficial for treating pain, arthritis, and other conditions. In this eMedTV page, you will learn more about the effects of diclofenac and find out exactly how this medication works to reduce pain and inflammation.
  • Diclofenac for Pain
    For the treatment of pain, diclofenac is often prescribed by healthcare providers. This eMedTV resource describes how diclofenac works for relieving pain and inflammation, and explains how the drug can be used for "off-label" purposes.
  • Diclofenac Gel
    Diclofenac gel is a medicated skin gel commonly prescribed to treat osteoarthritis or actinic keratosis. This eMedTV article offers information on how to use the gel, explains how the medicine works, and lists some of its possible side effects.
  • Diclofenac Medication Information
    Diclofenac is approved for relieving pain and treating conditions such as migraines or arthritis. This eMedTV segment provides more information about the prescription medication, including details on what else diclofenac is used for and how it works.
  • Diclofenac Patch
    The diclofenac patch is a prescription pain medicine used to treat acute pain caused by sprains and strains. This eMedTV segment further explains what the patches are used for, how the drug works, and what side effects may occur with treatment.
  • Diclofenac Potassium
    Diclofenac potassium is a drug licensed to relieve pain, inflammation, and swelling. This eMedTV page lists conditions that can be treated with this medicine (like osteoarthritis) and discusses its dosing information and potential side effects.
  • Diclofenac Problems
    It is possible to develop certain problems with diclofenac, although most people tolerate the drug well. This eMedTV segment lists common side effects of diclofenac and also describes some of the more serious problems that may occur with the medicine.
  • Diclofenac Risks
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac may cause liver damage in some people. This eMedTV segment explores other potential risks of diclofenac and also describes some of the more common (and often mild) side effects of the drug.
  • Diclofenac Side Effects
    Common side effects of diclofenac oral products include vomiting, dizziness, and gas. This eMedTV segment lists other possible side effects, including side effects that may occur with other products (such as skin patches or eye drops).
  • Diclofenac Sodium
    Diclofenac sodium is a prescription drug used to treat symptoms of several types of arthritis. This eMedTV article explains the conditions the drug can treat (such as osteoarthritis and ankylosing spondylitis), side effects, dosing, and strengths.
  • Diclofenac Sodium Side Effects
    As this eMedTV article explains, people taking diclofenac sodium may sometimes experience potentially life-threatening symptoms like chest pain and slurred speech. This article lists common, rare, and serious diclofenac sodium side effects.
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