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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Cure for Plague - Daypro Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Cure for Plague to Daypro Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Cure for Plague
    The best cure for plague is early treatment, as this eMedTV article explains. If a patient is diagnosed and treated early, there is an 85 percent chance of recovery. Since a vaccine is no longer available, prevention keeps the disease from spreading.
  • Cure for Polio
    The only cure for polio is time; in most cases, the body is able to effectively kill the poliovirus. As this eMedTV Web page explains, polio prevention is available in the form of a vaccine. This page explains how prevention is the best "cure."
  • Cure for Restless Legs Syndrome
    While restless legs syndrome (RLS) has no cure, there are still things that can be done. This eMedTV segment offers suggestions, such as treating any underlying conditions and getting better quality sleep, for reducing symptoms of RLS.
  • Cure for Shingles
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is currently no cure for shingles. However, early treatment with antiviral drugs can reduce the length and severity of a shingles attack. This page talks about these antiviral drugs and the new shingles vaccine.
  • Cure for Spina Bifida
    As this eMedTV segment explains, there is no spina bifida cure. However, there are treatments that can prevent and manage complications. This article talks about these treatment options, which include surgery and ongoing medical care.
  • Cure for Staph Infection
    The treatment options for a staph infection include warm compresses and antibiotics, among others. This eMedTV selection describes the ways in which a staph infection can be cured and explains why it's important to practice good hygiene during treatment.
  • Cure for the Common Cold
    Despite marketing claims to the contrary, there is no cure for the common cold. As explained in this eMedTV article, claims have been made for zinc, vitamin C, and echinacea -- but none of these can actually get rid of the common cold.
  • Cure for Viral Pneumonia
    As this eMedTV page explains, viral pneumonia cannot be cured with antibiotics. However, there are still things you can do to help treat it. This article takes a look at how this type of pneumonia is treated, with details on how long it usually lasts.
  • Cure Leprosy
    In order to cure leprosy, doctors prescribe antibiotics that kill the bacteria responsible for the disease. This eMedTV article discusses the three most commonly used antibiotics and explains what happened to people prior to their development.
  • Cures for Down Syndrome
    There are no cures for Down syndrome because the condition begins in the chromosomes. The information in this eMedTV page outlines current research investigating cures for Down syndrome, as well as more effective interventions and treatment options.
  • Cures for Giardia
    Cures for Giardia often consist of medications that treat the infection. As this eMedTV page explains, in addition to prescribed drugs, drinking plenty of fluids generally is successfully in treating cases of giardiasis.
  • Cures for Leprosy
    This eMedTV article lists the most common antibiotics used as cures for leprosy: rifampin, dapsone, and clofazimine. It also explains the success rate with these drugs and what happened to people prior to their development.
  • Cures for Osteoporosis
    There are no true cures for osteoporosis, as this eMedTV article explains. However, you can minimize your risk of developing the condition. This page describes ways to reduce your risk, including eating a healthy diet and quitting smoking.
  • Cushing's and Cortisol
    There is a relationship between Cushing's and cortisol. As explained in this eMedTV segment, exposure to an excess of cortisol for an extended period can lead to Cushing's syndrome. This article discusses cortisol and Cushing's syndrome.
  • Cushing's Disease
    Cushing's disease is a hormonal condition caused by a pituitary tumor resulting in an excess of cortisol. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this disease, including information about its symptoms, its diagnosis, and its treatment.
  • Cushing's Disease Treatment
    Surgery, medication, and radiation therapy are common treatment options for Cushing's disease. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at these treatments, including information about second opinions, side effects, and clinical trials.
  • Cushing's Syndrome
    Cushing's syndrome is a rare disorder that occurs when the body produces excessive levels of cortisol. This eMedTV article discusses causes and symptoms, as well as how the disease is diagnosed and treated, and factors that affect prognosis.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Symptoms
    For people with Cushing's syndrome, symptoms may include extreme weight gain and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article discusses more signs and symptoms of the condition and explains which ones are more common in adults.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Testing
    This eMedTV article covers tests used to diagnose Cushing's syndrome and identify its cause, such as the 24-hour urinary free cortisol level test. Doctors use testing to determine if excess levels of cortisol are present and why.
  • Cushings Desease
    In a person with Cushing's disease, a pituitary tumor produces an excess of cortisol. This eMedTV Web page briefly defines this disease and explains how it can be diagnosed and treated. Cushings desease is a common misspelling of Cushing's disease.
  • Cutaneous Anthrax
    Cutaneous anthrax is a type of infection in which bacteria enter a cut or abrasion. As this eMedTV resource explains, this is the most common form of anthrax, accounting for about 95 percent of all cases of the disease, but it responds well to treatment.
  • Cutivate
    Cutivate products are prescribed for various skin conditions, such as dermatitis, psoriasis, and eczema. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this medicine, including how it works, possible side effects, and a list of the different forms.
  • Cutivate Lotion
    Cutivate Lotion is a topical steroid prescribed to treat a skin condition called dermatitis. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at this medicine, including how it works, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Cyclesa
    Cyclessa is a drug that is used to prevent pregnancy. This article on the eMedTV site offers a brief overview of this birth control pill and provides a link to more detailed information. Cyclesa is a common misspelling of Cyclessa.
  • Cyclessa
    Cyclessa is a prescription birth control pill. This selection from the eMedTV archives offers an in-depth look at the drug, including detailed information on its uses, dosing guidelines, warnings, possible side effects, and more.
  • Cyclobenzaprene
    Cyclobenzaprine is a drug licensed to treat muscle spasms due to injuries or other muscle problems. This eMedTV article offers general precautions for taking this product. Cyclobenzaprene is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclobenzaprine
    Cyclobenzaprine is a prescription drug that is licensed for the treatment of muscle spasms. This eMedTV Web page describes cyclobenzaprine in more detail, explaining what types of muscle spasms the drug can treat and listing potential side effects.
  • Cyclobenzaprine Hydrochloride (HCl) Information
    This eMedTV article contains some basic drug information on cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride (HCl), a muscle relaxant. Side effects, warnings, and dosing guidelines are covered in this selection, and a link to more details is included.
  • Cyclobenziprine
    As this eMedTV page explains, cyclobenzaprine is prescribed to treat muscle spasms. This page offers a brief overview of cyclobenzaprine and discusses the factors that may affect your dosage. Cyclobenziprine is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclocort
    Cyclocort is a topical medicine prescribed to treat certain skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV Web page presents an overview of this steroid, including specific uses, details on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Cyclophosphamide
    Cyclophosphamide is a chemotherapy drug that may be used to treat various cancers (such as leukemia). This eMedTV article explores other uses of the drug, and also discusses dosing guidelines and possible side effects.
  • Cycloset
    Cycloset is a prescription medication used for controlling blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explores how the drug may work, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Cycloset Medication Information
    Cycloset is a prescription medicine used for controlling blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Cycloset, including guidelines on how to take the medication and important warnings for the drug.
  • Cyclosporin
    Cyclosporine helps prevent organ rejection in people who have had a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This eMedTV page takes a look at this prescription drug, including other uses and side effects. Cyclosporin is a common misspelling of cyclosporine.
  • Cyclosporine
    Cyclosporine is a drug used to prevent organ rejection and to treat psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV article gives a detailed overview of this prescription medicine, including how it works, dosing tips, and possible side effects.
  • Cyclosporine Side Effects
    If you are taking cyclosporine and experience unusual bleeding or problems breathing, seek medical care. This eMedTV resource describes the side effects that occurred during clinical trials on cyclosporine, including common and serious problems.
  • Cyctic Fibrosis
    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease affecting the mucus and sweat glands. This eMedTV article offers a brief description of this disease and provides a link to more information. Cyctic fibrosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • More About Cylaris
    People who are trying to lose weight may decide to use Cylaris, an herbal weight loss supplement. This eMedTV article takes a look at various aspects of Cylaris, such as how it works, its safety and effectiveness, and possible side effects.
  • Cylaris Weight Loss Pills
    This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of Cylaris, a pill designed for weight loss. This segment lists some of the ingredients in this product, describes how it may work, and includes a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Cymbacort
    A doctor may prescribe Symbicort to help prevent asthma and COPD symptoms from occurring. This eMedTV segment gives a brief description of Symbicort and explains why the drug is not used to "treat" asthma. Cymbacort is a common misspelling of Symbicort.
  • Cymbalta
    Cymbalta has been approved to treat various conditions, such as neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, anxiety, and depression. This eMedTV page explains how the drug affects certain chemicals in the brain, lists potential side effects, and offers tips.
  • Cymbalta 30 mg Capsules
    As this portion from the eMedTV Web archives explains, a doctor may prescribe Cymbalta 30 mg capsules once or twice a day to treat conditions such as anxiety or depression. This page also describes factors that may affect your dosage.
  • Cymbalta and Alcohol
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains why people may want to avoid combining Cymbalta and alcohol. This article also explains what healthcare providers recommend to those people who choose to drink alcohol while taking the medication.
  • Cymbalta and Fibromyalgia
    People with fibromyalgia can now take Cymbalta to help relieve symptoms. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses the results of recent studies on this medication and discusses some of the other uses for this prescription antidepressant.
  • Cymbalta and Insomnia
    Insomnia appears to be one of the more common side effects of Cymbalta. This portion of the eMedTV library examines Cymbalta and insomnia, explaining some symptoms of insomnia and highlighting some tips on how to improve your sleep habits.
  • Cymbalta and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take Cymbalta when pregnant. This eMedTV segment explains that based on animal studies of Cymbalta and pregnancy, the FDA classifies Cymbalta as a pregnancy Category C medicine because it does affect animal fetuses.
  • Cymbalta and Weight Gain
    This portion of the eMedTV library discusses the results of clinical trials on Cymbalta, explaining that an increase in weight is a possible side effect of the medication. This page also lists some suggestions for controlling weight gain with Cymbalta.
  • Cymbalta Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use Cymbalta if you have certain medical conditions, such as bipolar disorder. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential Cymbalta dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with this medication.
  • Cymbalta Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that your dosage of Cymbalta is usually determined by the medical condition you are being treated for, other drugs you are taking, and other medical conditions you may have. This page also offers tips on taking this drug.
  • Cymbalta Drug Information
    Cymbalta is an antidepressant commonly used to treat depression, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. This eMedTV resource offers more Cymbalta drug information, including a list of possible side effects and important warnings and precautions.
  • Cymbalta Medication
    This eMedTV article presents a brief introduction to Cymbalta, a medication used to treat several different conditions, from depression to diabetic neuropathy. This segment includes some general dosing guidelines and includes a link to more information.
  • Cymbalta Medicine for Anxiety
    As this eMedTV page explains, Cymbalta works to treat anxiety by affecting certain chemicals in the brain. This page further discusses using this medicine for anxiety, as well as how Cymbalta works to increase the amount of the chemicals.
  • Cymbalta Overdose
    If you have overdosed on Cymbalta, you may have symptoms such as vomiting or seizures. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at what can happen with an overdose of this medication and explains why it's so important to seek medical attention.
  • Cymbalta Side Effects
    Some of the most common Cymbalta side effects can include headaches, diarrhea, and insomnia. This eMedTV segment also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious side effects of the drug, such as hallucinations and suicidal thoughts.
  • Cymbalta Tablets
    There are no Cymbalta tablets; the antidepressant is only available in capsule form. This article from the eMedTV library explains what Cymbalta is used for and provides general dosing guidelines for the treatment of these various conditions.
  • Cymbalta Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Cymbalta can be prescribed to adults with depression, generalized anxiety disorder, or certain other conditions. This page describes how the medication works and also explores an off-label use of Cymbalta.
  • Cymbalta Withdrawal
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that withdrawal from Cymbalta can occur if a person abruptly stops taking the medication. This page also outlines some withdrawal symptoms and explains what you can do to minimize them.
  • Cymbalta Withdrawl
    Withdrawal symptoms can occur if Cymbalta is stopped too abruptly. This eMedTV Web page describes Cymbalta withdrawal symptoms in more detail, including how they can be minimized. Cymbalta withdrawl is a common misspelling of Cymbalta withdrawal.
  • Cyprexa
    Zyprexa is a drug used for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at Zyprexa and provides a link to more detailed information on the drug. Cyprexa is a common misspelling of Zyprexa.
  • Cypro
    Cipro is a medicine that is commonly used for the treatment of bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment explains how this prescription antibiotic works, when it is taken, and potential side effects. Cypro is a common misspelling of Cipro.
  • Cystic Fibosis
    This eMedTV resource defines cystic fibrosis, a disease that affects a person's mucus and sweat glands. This page describes the condition and its symptoms, treatment, and prognosis. Cystic fibosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic Fibroses
    As this eMedTV article explains, cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease. It mostly affects the mucus and sweat glands. Fortunately, treatment of this disease has improved in recent years. Cystic fibroses is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic Fibrosis
    In the United States, cystic fibrosis is a common genetic disease that mainly affects Caucasians. This eMedTV segment provides a complete overview of cystic fibrosis, including information on the causes, symptoms, and treatments of this disease.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, making a cystic fibrosis diagnosis involves taking the patient's medical history, performing a physical examination, and ordering tests (particularly a sweat test). Prenatal testing is also discussed.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Gene
    As this eMedTV article explains, the full name of the gene for cystic fibrosis is the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A defect in this gene what causes the gene, and this page explains how it is inherited.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy
    As this eMedTV article explains, gene therapy for cystic fibrosis does more than treat symptoms; it targets the cause of the disease. This page covers the challenges, history, and effects of this type of gene therapy.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Genetic Testing
    As this eMedTV article explains, genetic testing for cystic fibrosis usually involves a DNA-based blood test. Although this type of test is highly accurate, it should not be used alone to diagnose cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Information
    This eMedTV resource provides some basic information on cystic fibrosis, a condition that affects the production of mucus and the action of the sweat glands. It describes some of the effects cystic fibrosis has in the body, with a link to learn more.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Sweat Test
    The cystic fibrosis sweat test measures the amount of salt in your sweat. As this eMedTV article explains, it is the most useful test for making a diagnosis. This page discusses the sweat test in detail and includes a link to other information.
  • Cystic Fibrosis Symptoms
    Common cystic fibrosis symptoms include frequent coughing, salty-tasting skin, and dehydration. This eMedTV article discusses these signs and symptoms in detail. This article also lists some of the medical conditions that can result from these symptoms.
  • Cystic Firbosis
    Cystic fibrosis is a disease that affects a person's mucus and sweat glands. This eMedTV Web page offers a description of this condition and provides a link to more information. Cystic firbosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic Fribrosis
    An inherited disease, cystic fibrosis often affects the lungs, pancreas, and liver. This eMedTV article further describes this condition, including information on its effects and treatment. Cystic fribrosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystic Fybrosis
    This page on the eMedTV Web site explores cystic fibrosis, a disease of the mucus and sweat glands. This page covers organs affected by the disease and some of its common symptoms. Cystic fybrosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Cystitis Interstital
    Interstitial cystitis is a condition characterized by chronic bladder pain and discomfort. This eMedTV page offers statistics on the illness and a list of symptoms and treatments. Cystitis interstital is a common misspelling of interstitial cystitis.
  • Cystocele
    Also known as a fallen bladder, a cystocele occurs when the bladder droops into the vagina. This eMedTV article discusses this condition in detail, including information on what causes it, how it is treated, and more.
  • Cystoscopy
    A cystoscopy allows your doctor to see the inside of your bladder and urethra. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this procedure, which is used when a person experiences certain urinary problems.
  • Cytomel
    Cytomel is a medication used as a thyroid replacement for people with an underactive thyroid. This eMedTV Web page explains how Cytomel works and offers a more in-depth look at the drug's effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Cytomel Side Effects
    Potential Cytomel side effects include diarrhea, shakiness, and increased appetite. This eMedTV resource provides a list of other possible side effects of Cytomel and describes common signs of an allergic reaction, which could occur with this drug.
  • Cytotec
    Cytotec is licensed to prevent stomach ulcers in people who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This eMedTV Web page contains an overview of this medicine, including how it works, side effects, dosing instructions, and more.
  • Cytoxan
    A doctor may prescribe Cytoxan to treat various types of cancer, such as leukemia and breast cancer. This eMedTV resource lists other types of cancer that can be treated with Cytoxan, explains how the drug works, and offers dosing information.
  • Cytoxan Chemotherapy Information
    Are you looking for information on Cytoxan? This eMedTV article presents a brief overview of this drug, which is used for chemotherapy as well as a treatment for a certain kind of kidney disease. It discusses the drug's uses and possible side effects.
  • Cytoxan Side Effects
    Side effects of Cytoxan can include nausea or vomiting, temporary menstrual changes, and diarrhea. This eMedTV page covers other possible side effects, including serious problems that require medical attention (such as blood in the stool).
  • Dabigatran
    Dabigatran is a "blood thinner" used to prevent blood clots and strokes. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at this prescription drug, including details on possible side effects, how it works, dosing tips, and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Daily Cialis
    When taking Cialis, you have the choice of taking it every day or on an as-needed basis. This part of the eMedTV site discusses the daily use of Cialis, explaining the factors that will affect the amount your healthcare provider prescribes.
  • Daily Viagra
    Viagra is not taken on a daily basis. Viagra is typically taken one hour before sexual activity, as needed. This eMedTV article also covers some general dosing guidelines for this erectile dysfunction medication, including recommended amounts.
  • Dalmain
    This page on the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at the prescription drug Dalmane, noting in particular its uses (focused mainly on insomnia), effects, and general precautions and warnings. Dalmain is a common misspelling of Dalmane.
  • Dalmane
    Dalmane is a prescription drug that has several effects on the body, including causing sleepiness. This eMedTV Web page provides a general overview of the medication, noting in particular its side effects, strengths, and dosing guidelines.
  • Dalmane Abuse
    Some people who take Dalmane may abuse the drug or become dependent on it. This eMedTV article explains that the medication should usually be taken for short periods (one or two weeks or less) to reduce the chances of Dalmane abuse.
  • Dalmane Side Effects
    Dizziness, drowsiness, and heartburn are among the possible side effects of Dalmane. This eMedTV page also lists some less common side effects seen with this drug (for example, sweating), as well as several serious side effects (like depression).
  • Dalteparin
    Available by prescription, dalteparin is a type of "blood thinner" used to treat and prevent blood clots. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on its specific uses, how it works, and potential side effects.
  • Damiana
    The damiana plant allegedly helps treat several conditions, although how it does this is not known. This eMedTV page provides a detailed overview of this herbal remedy, including its various uses, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Damiana Side Effects Review
    Because not enough studies have been done on damiana, side effects are currently unknown. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses the possibility of side effects in more detail, explaining what to watch for and when to contact your doctor.
  • Dangerous Side Effects and Revlimid
    Liver damage and bleeding problems are some of the dangerous side effects that may occur with Revlimid. This eMedTV segment describes other potential complications and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Dangers of Botox
    Botox injections in the area near the eyes can sometimes cause vision changes. This article from the eMedTV Web site explores other potential dangers of Botox and describes some of the most common side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Dangers of Chromium Picolinate
    It may be dangerous to take chromium picolinate if you have diabetes or liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV Web page discusses other dangers of chromium picolinate, including precautions that people should be aware of before taking the supplement.
  • Dangers of Colchicine
    You may not be able to use colchicine if you have certain conditions (such as kidney or liver problems). This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at the potential dangers of colchicine and explains what you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Dangers of Hoodia
    No adequate studies concerning the safety of hoodia have been performed and published. This eMedTV Web page explores other potential dangers of hoodia and offers information on who should consult their doctors before using this herbal supplement.
  • Dangers of Lipitor
    There are not many potential dangers of Lipitor; most people tolerate this medication well. As this eMedTV page explains, when Lipitor side effects do occur, in most cases, they are minor and either do not require treatment or can be treated easily.
  • Dangers of Nicorette Gum
    You may not be able to use Nicorette Gum safely if you have certain conditions, such as diabetes. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at the potential dangers of Nicorette Gum and explains what you should be aware of before starting treatment with it.
  • Dangers of Phenylalanine
    The only people who need to be concerned about the dangers of phenylalanine are those with PKU. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains why this is the case and why otherwise normal, healthy adults do not need to be worried about phenylalanine.
  • Dangers of Taking Sandimmune
    Certain dangers are associated with taking Sandimmune, such as kidney damage. This eMedTV article explores a few of the risks this drug presents, stresses the importance of reporting anything "odd" to your doctor, and links to more information.
  • Dantrium
    Available by prescription, Dantrium is a drug licensed to treat muscle spasticity due to certain conditions. This eMedTV article presents a description of important features of this medicine, including how it works, how it is used, side effects, and more.
  • Dantrolene
    Dantrolene is a muscle relaxant prescribed to treat muscle spasticity and malignant hyperthermia. This eMedTV Web page gives a comprehensive overview of this prescription medication, including dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Dapro
    Daypro is commonly prescribed for people with certain forms of arthritis. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works, how it is taken, and its various uses. A link to more information is also included. Dapro is a common misspelling of Daypro.
  • Daptacel
    Daptacel is a routine childhood vaccine approved to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough. This eMedTV segment describes how the vaccine works, explains when your child should get vaccinated, and lists possible side effects of the product.
  • Darbepoetin Alfa
    Darbepoetin alfa is a drug that is prescribed to treat anemia due to chronic kidney failure or chemotherapy. This eMedTV page explains how the medicine works, offers dosing information, and explains what you should know before starting treatment.
  • Darvacet
    Darvocet is a prescription pain medicine specifically approved to treat mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV page describes Darvocet in more detail and lists some of the potential side effects of this drug. Darvacet is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvaset
    Darvocet is a narcotic drug often prescribed to treat mild-to-moderate pain. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how often Darvocet should be taken and offers general warnings for this medicine. Darvaset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darveset
    The prescription pain medication Darvocet is used to relieve mild to moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV archives explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this narcotic drug. Darveset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darviset
    Darvocet is a prescription narcotic drug commonly used to treat mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV Web page explains how often it should be taken and lists potential side effects of the medication. Darviset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvocet
    Darvocet is a medication that is approved for the treatment of mild-to-moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV library explains how the drug works, describes the effects of this medicine, and provides a list of potential side effects.
  • Darvocet Addiction
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) is a drug that can be habit-forming. This eMedTV resource lists possible signs of Darvocet addiction and explores the physical, emotional, and social consequences of addiction.
  • Darvocet and Hair Loss
    Hair loss does not appear to be a side effect of Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen). This page from the eMedTV archives offers more information on Darvocet and hair loss, and explains what you should do if this side effect does occur.
  • Darvocet and Valium
    It is generally recommended that you do not combine Darvocet and Valium. This eMedTV Web page explains what may happen if these two drugs are taken together and provides a list of other medications that may interact with Darvocet.
  • Darvocet Contraindications
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) should not be given to people who are suicidal or addiction prone. This eMedTV article discusses other Darvocet contraindications and offers general warnings and precautions for this medication.
  • Darvocet Dosage
    For Darvocet A500, the recommended dosage is one tablet every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV article also offers Darvocet dosage recommendations for Darvocet-N 50 and Darvocet-N 100, and includes tips for using this medication.
  • Darvocet Drug Information
    Darvocet is a narcotic pain medication that is classified as a controlled substance. This eMedTV page contains other important Darvocet drug information, including an explanation of what you should discuss with your doctor before using this medicine.
  • Darvocet in Early Pregnancy
    At this time, it is not known whether Darvocet is safe for use during pregnancy. As this section of the eMedTV library explains, it is assumed that the risk for birth defects due to this medicine is greatest when you take Darvocet in early pregnancy.
  • Darvocet Medication for Pain
    Darvocet is a prescription pain medication that contains a narcotic and acetaminophen. As this eMedTV segment explains, doctors may prescribe Darvocet for pain that is short-term (such as pain after a dental procedure) or long-term.
  • Darvocet N
    There are three different types of Darvocet (Darvocet-N 50, Darvocet-N 100, and Darvocet A500). This eMedTV resource describes the effects of Darvocet, offers general dosing information, and explores the risks of using controlled substances.
  • Darvocet Schedule
    There are various "schedules" of controlled substances, ranging from Schedule I to Schedule V. As this eMedTV page explains, with Darvocet, Schedule IV has been assigned (meaning it has less abuse potential compared to Schedule I, II, or III drugs).
  • Darvocet Side Effects
    Common side effects of Darvocet include nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness. As this eMedTV page explains, while most side effects of the drug are mild, some are potentially serious and require medical attention (such as hives or difficulty breathing).
  • Darvocet Vs. Vicodin
    Many people do not know the difference between Darvocet versus Vicodin. This eMedTV resource explores some of the similarities and differences between Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) and Vicodin, and explains which drug is stronger.
  • Darvocet Withdrawal
    Withdrawal symptoms may occur if you stop taking Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) too abruptly. This eMedTV Web page lists common symptoms of withdrawal from Darvocet and explains what steps your doctor may take to limit these symptoms.
  • Darvocet-N 100
    For Darvocet-N 100, the recommended dosage is one tablet every four hours as needed for pain. This page on the eMedTV Web site also includes Darvocet dosing guidelines for the other two forms of the drug (Darvocet-N 50 and Darvocet A500).
  • Darvocet-N 50
    The recommended dosage for Darvocet-N 50 is two tablets every four hours as needed. As this eMedTV page explains, the maximum recommended dose is 12 tablets per day. This article also covers dosing guidelines for Darvocet-N 100 and Darvocet A500.
  • Darvocete
    Darvocet is a pain killer approved for treating mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV page describes the effects of the drug and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using it. Darvocete is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvon
    Darvon is a prescription pain medication. This article from the eMedTV Web site provides an in-depth look at the drug, including information on its effects, abuse potential, possible side effects, dosing information, general precautions, and more.
  • Darvon Medication for Pain
    Darvon is prescribed to treat mild to moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV Web site explores this pain medication, describing some of Darvon's side effects and safety concerns. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Darvon vs. Vicodin
    This eMedTV page explores Darvon vs. Vicodin, explaining some of the similarities and differences between these pain medications. This page discusses why doctors may not prescribe Darvon in many situations and how Vicodin is a "stronger" pain reliever.
  • Darvon Without a Prescription
    It is not safe to buy Darvon without a prescription. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains how buying this drug without a prescription may increase your risk of getting a dangerous product and describes how to obtain a legitimate prescription.
  • Darvoset
    Darvocet is a prescription narcotic drug that is taken every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV article discusses its uses in more detail and describes the various components of this medicine. Darvoset is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Dasatinib
    Dasatinib is a medicine prescribed to slow down the progression of certain types of cancer. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this medication, with detailed information on how to take it, how it works, general safety concerns, and more.
  • DASH Diet
    The DASH eating plan (also known as the DASH diet) has been shown in several research studies to lower blood pressure. This section of the eMedTV library describes the DASH diet in detail and provides a sample eating plan.
  • DASH Diet for Blood Pressure
    People with high blood pressure may want to try the DASH diet (dietary approaches to stop hypertension). This eMedTV article provides a sample of the DASH diet for blood pressure and offers tips on how to incorporate it into your lifestyle.
  • DASH Eating Plan
    The DASH eating plan, as this eMedTV article explains, is low in saturated fat and high in fiber, protein, and magnesium, and has been proven to lower blood pressure. This article discusses the plan in detail and provides a sample to get you started.
  • Datrana
    Daytrana is a prescription drug that is used to treat ADHD in children and adolescents. This page on the eMedTV Web site offers a brief overview of Daytrana and includes a link to more information. Datrana is a common misspelling of Daytrana.
  • Daycare
    Safety, cost, and location are some of the factors to consider when searching for a daycare for your baby. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other factors to consider during your search, including potential dangers.
  • Daycare Providers
    Some parents may prefer to hire an individual daycare provider rather than use a daycare center. This eMedTV page offers several tips for finding a private childcare provider, including a list of questions to ask your potential caregiver.
  • Daypro
    Daypro is a drug often prescribed to treat pain and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. This eMedTV Web page offers more details on the medication, including its specific uses, effects, and general dosing information.
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