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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Cure for Plague - Daypro Side Effects

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Cure for Plague to Daypro Side Effects. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Current Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis
    Various treatments for multiple sclerosis are available, which this video describes.
  • Cushing's Disease Diagnosis
    A Cushing's disease diagnosis often involves urine tests, imaging tests (such as MRIs), and blood tests. This eMedTV article outlines steps involved in diagnosing Cushing's disease, including information about petrosal sinus sampling and other tests.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Causes
    In the case of Cushing's syndrome, causes of the disorder can include pituitary and adrenal tumors. This eMedTV resource describes possible causes of Cushing's syndrome, including glucocorticoid hormones and ectopic ACTH syndrome.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Diagnosis
    Making a Cushing's syndrome diagnosis often involves a physical exam and a cortisol level test. This eMedTV article discusses steps doctors use in diagnosing Cushing's syndrome, which often include a review of the patient's medical history.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Information
    If you are looking for information on Cushing's syndrome, this eMedTV resource is a good place to start. This article gives a brief description of this hormonal disorder, with details on possible symptoms, causes, and more.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Prognosis
    A Cushing's syndrome prognosis depends on what caused the hormonal disorder. As this eMedTV Web page explains, most cases of Cushing's syndrome can be cured; however, some people's recovery can be complicated by the illness that caused the disorder.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Research
    Cushing's syndrome research is being conducted to learn how to better diagnose the condition. This eMedTV segment explores some research now under way on Cushing's syndrome and discusses the possible benefits of participating in such research.
  • Cushing's Syndrome Treatment
    For people with Cushing's syndrome, treatment options may include surgery, radiotherapy, and drugs. This eMedTV article explains how the cause of excess cortisol production responsible for the disorder affects how Cushing's syndrome is treated.
  • Cut It Out
    Sometimes what you don't eat is more important than what you do eat. Avoiding pro-inflammatory foods is an important component in the fight against inflammation. Some of the worst offenders are saturated fats, trans-fats, and sugar. Most highly processed foods are also highly inflammatory, thanks to the high content of sugar or "bad" fats. So try exchanging that box of sugary breakfast cereal for a bowl of oatmeal to help reduce inflammation.
  • Cut the Carbs
    Cut the simple carbs, that is. Your brain and nervous system actually need carbs to function properly. But complex carbs are the better option, including legumes (beans, lentils, dried peas), fresh fruits and vegetables, and whole grains. Don't be fooled by processed foods that are labeled "whole grain." When a grain is processed even a small amount, it loses some nutritional value and gains more starch. Eat grains in their natural form as much as possible.
  • Cutivate and Breastfeeding
    Make sure to talk to your doctor before using Cutivate (topical fluticasone propionate) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and explains what the manufacturer of the drug recommends.
  • Cutivate and Pregnancy
    Women who are pregnant may not be able to use Cutivate (topical fluticasone propionate). This eMedTV Web page discusses the results of animal studies that were performed on this drug and describes the potential problems that may occur in a fetus.
  • Cutivate Cream
    Available by prescription, Cutivate Cream can treat various skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV article offers a complete overview of this prescription medicine, including how it works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Cutivate Cream and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for women to use Cutivate Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource takes a look at whether this medicine passes through breast milk and explains what your doctor may recommend.
  • Cutivate Cream and Pregnancy
    It is unclear if Cutivate Cream (fluticasone propionate cream) is safe during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment gives details on what happened when this medicine was used during animal studies and why this product is listed as a pregnancy Category C drug.
  • Cutivate Medication Information
    Available by prescription only, Cutivate is used for treating psoriasis, eczema, and other skin problems. This eMedTV article offers more information on Cutivate, including various forms of the medication, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Cutivate Ointment
    Cutivate Ointment is used to treat a wide variety of skin conditions that cause itching and inflammation. This eMedTV article provides a detailed overview of this product, with information on how it works, dosing guidelines, side effects, and more.
  • Cutivate Topical Ointment
    As this eMedTV page explains, Cutivate is an ointment that is applied topically to affected areas of the skin in order to treat conditions that cause inflammation. This page offers a brief overview of this drug, with a link to more detailed information.
  • Cyanobalamin Nasal Spray
    A healthcare provider may prescribe cyanocobalamin nasal spray to boost vitamin B12 levels. This eMedTV segment discusses some dosing instructions and links to more details. Cyanobalamin nasal spray is a common misspelling of cyanocobalamin nasal spray.
  • Cyanocobalamine Nasal Spray
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people who have low vitamin B12 levels may benefit from cyanocobalamin nasal spray. This page describes specific uses and side effects. Cyanocobalamine nasal spray is a common misspelling of cyanocobalamin nasal spray.
  • Cyanocobalomin Nasal Spray
    Available by prescription only, cyanocobalamin nasal spray is used to increase vitamin B12 levels. This eMedTV page takes a look at dosing information and side effects. Cyanocobalomin nasal spray is a common misspelling of cyanocobalamin nasal spray.
  • Cyclafem
    Cyclafem is a prescription drug used to prevent pregnancy. It comes in two different versions, which, as this eMedTV page explains, are actually generic types of Ortho-Novum. This page also describes how this contraceptive works, side effects, and more.
  • Cyclessa Birth Control Pills
    Cyclessa is a prescription drug used to prevent pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV library takes a quick look at this birth control pill, with information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this contraceptive.
  • Cyclobenzapine
    As this eMedTV page explains, cyclobenzaprine is used for the temporary treatment of muscle spasms caused by injuries or other muscle problems. This page also covers some general precautions. Cyclobenzapine is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclobenzaprin
    Cyclobenzaprine is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of certain types of muscle spasms. This eMedTV page further discusses cyclobenzaprine, including possible side effects and dosing tips. Cyclobenzaprin is a common misspelling of cyclobenzaprine.
  • Cyclosporine 100 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that your weight is one of the factors your doctor will consider when determining whether to prescribe 25 mg, 50, mg, or 100 mg of cyclosporine. This page lists the many different forms of cyclosporine.
  • Cyclosporine 50 Mg
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at when a doctor may prescribe the cyclosporine 50-mg capsules and intravenous injections. This article also lists the other forms and strengths of cyclosporine that are available and links to more details on this drug.
  • Cyclosporine and Blood Pressure Medication
    This eMedTV resource explains how combining cyclosporine with a blood pressure medication may cause a negative reaction. This page covers how this reaction may increase blood levels of the medicines or increase your risk for kidney problems.
  • Cyclosporine and Headache
    If you are taking cyclosporine, you may develop a headache. This eMedTV Web selection takes a brief look at other possible side effects of this medication, including details on when to contact your doctor. A link to more information is also included.
  • Cyclosporine and Psoriatic Arthritis
    A healthcare provider may prescribe cyclosporine "off-label" to treat severe cases of psoriatic arthritis. This eMedTV page explains how this medicine may help relieve symptoms of this condition and why this is not an officially approved use of the drug.
  • Cyclosporine and Vaccinations
    You should not receive live vaccinations while taking cyclosporine. This eMedTV Web selection lists some of the live vaccines that may cause problems with cyclosporine and provides a link to more details on possible interactions with this drug.
  • Cyclosporine Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, cyclosporine capsules, liquid solution, or injections may be prescribed to prevent an organ transplant rejection or to treat psoriasis or rheumatoid arthritis. This page takes a closer look at the various forms of this drug.
  • Cyclosporine Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, cyclosporine dosing guidelines will vary, depending on your weight, the condition being treated, and various other factors. This page explores other factors that may affect your dose and offers tips on taking this drug.
  • Cyclosporine for Psoriasis
    As this eMedTV article explains, some people with severe cases of plaque psoriasis may benefit from cyclosporine. This resource further discusses this use of cyclosporine, including how the medication works. A link to more information is also included.
  • Cyclosporine Hair Growth
    If you are taking cyclosporine, be aware that hair growth is a possible and common side effect of the drug. This eMedTV segment explains how often excessive facial or body hair growth occurs in people taking it, and also provides a link to more details.
  • Cyclosporine Immune Suppression
    You may experience immune suppression while taking cyclosporine, which can increase your risk of infections. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of the problems that may occur with a weakened immune system. A link to more details is also included.
  • Cyclosporine Mechanism of Action
    By suppressing the immune system, cyclosporine can help prevent organ transplant rejection. This eMedTV page explores how cyclosporine's mechanism of action can also help relieve the symptoms of certain cases of rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis.
  • Cyclosporine Ophthalmic Emulsion
    Cyclosporine ophthalmic emulsion is a prescription eye drop used to treat chronic dry eyes. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at this medicine, providing information on its dosing, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Cyclosporine Toxicity
    Seizures and vomiting are some of the possible symptoms of cyclosporine toxicity. This eMedTV Web page lists other signs that may indicate a person has overdosed on this drug. This page also includes a link to more details on a cyclosporine overdose.
  • Cyclosporine-Induced Hypertension
    You may experience cyclosporine-induced hypertension (high blood pressure) during treatment with this drug. This eMedTV article discusses the results of clinical studies done on this drug, including statistics on how frequently this side effect occurred.
  • Cyclosprine
    Cyclosporine is a drug licensed to prevent organ rejection after a transplant. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of other uses for this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Cyclosprine is a common misspelling of cyclosporine.
  • Cyclsporine
    Cyclosporine is a drug used to prevent organ rejection after a kidney, liver, or heart transplant. This eMedTV article describes other uses, covers some dosing information, and lists side effects. Cyclsporine is a common misspelling of cyclosporine.
  • Cylatron
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who have had surgery to remove malignant melanoma may help delay the cancer's return by using Sylatron. This page gives a brief overview of this drug. Cylatron is a common misspelling of Sylatron.
  • Cylexa
    Celexa is a prescription drug commonly used for treating depression. This eMedTV resource explains how Celexa works, describes the effects of the drug, and lists possible side effects that may occur. Cylexa is a common misspelling of Celexa.
  • Cyloxan
    Ciloxan is a prescription medicine used to treat bacterial conjunctivitis and corneal ulcers. This eMedTV Web selection explains how Ciloxan works and lists some of its potential side effects. Cyloxan is a common misspelling of Ciloxan.
  • Cymbalta 20 mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, Cymbalta 20 mg capsules are the lowest strength available for this medication. This page covers some general dosing guidelines for various conditions and describes the factors that may affect your Cymbalta dosage.
  • Cymbalta 60 mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Cymbalta 60 mg capsules are the strongest strength available for this medication. This page covers some general Cymbalta dosing guidelines for various conditions, such as depression, fibromyalgia, and anxiety.
  • Cymbalta Antidepressant
    Cymbalta is a prescription drug used for treating depression, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. This eMedTV article covers other uses of the antidepressant, explains how Cymbalta works, and lists potential side effects of this medication.
  • Cymbalta Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, Cymbalta capsules are a prescription medication used to treat conditions such as depression and fibromyalgia. Potential side effects and available strengths are discussed and a link to more information is provided.
  • Cymbalta for Depression
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, Cymbalta is a medication used to treat several conditions, including depression. This page further discusses using Cymbalta for depression, including information on how the medicine works and a link to learn more.
  • Cymbalta for Pain
    As this eMedTV article explains, doctors may prescribe the antidepressant Cymbalta for certain types of pain. This Web page covers the drug's approved uses, explains how it works, and lists possible off-label uses for Cymbalta.
  • Cymbalta Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, Cymbalta oral capsules are often prescribed to treat conditions such as depression, anxiety, and fibromyalgia. This page explains how this drug works, covers possible side effects, and lists available strengths.
  • Cymbalta Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using Cymbalta may include headaches, diarrhea, and nausea. This page of the eMedTV Web library describes other warnings, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Cymbalta Side Affects
    While most Cymbalta side effects are minor, some require medical attention. This eMedTV segment briefly describes these side effects of Cymbalta and links to more information. Cymbalta side affects is a common misspelling of Cymbalta side effects.
  • Cymbalta Side Iffects
    Common Cymbalta side effects include insomnia, nausea, and headache. This eMedTV article also explains which problems are potentially serious and require medical attention. Cymbalta side iffects is a common misspelling of Cymbalta side effects.
  • Cymbalta Substitute
    If you have side effects or if Cymbalta is not working for you, several alternatives are available. This eMedTV Web resource describes several Cymbalta substitutes, such as other medications, therapy, and natural alternatives.
  • Cymbalta Weight Change
    In clinical trials with Cymbalta, weight change was reported as a common side effect. As this eMedTV article explains, a number of people reported weight loss with this medication, but a small percentage also reported experiencing weight gain.
  • Cymbalta Withdrawall Symptoms
    Up to 44 percent of people who abruptly stop taking Cymbalta will experience withdrawal symptoms. This eMedTV resource explains Cymbalta withdrawal symptoms in more detail. Cymbalta withdrawall symptoms is a common misspelling of Cymbalta withdrawal.
  • Cymbalta Withdrawel
    This eMedTV page explains that although withdrawal symptoms are common when people stop taking Cymbalta, the symptoms can be minimized. Cymbalta withdrawel is a common misspelling of Cymbalta withdrawal.
  • Cymbicort
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Symbicort to help prevent asthma and COPD attacks. This eMedTV Web segment highlights possible side effects and offers some general precautions for the medication. Cymbicort is a common misspelling of Symbicort.
  • Cymblata
    This eMedTV resource explains how Cymbalta works to treat depression, neuropathic pain, and other conditions. This page also describes the factors that may affect your Cymbalta dosage. Cymblata is a common misspelling of Cymbalta.
  • Cymbolta
    This eMedTV page explains that Cymbalta can treat several conditions, such as depression, neuropathic pain, and generalized anxiety disorder. This article also lists some common side effects of Cymbalta. Cymbolta is a common misspelling of Cymbalta.
  • Cytomil
    Cytomel is a prescription medicine licensed to treat hypothyroidism and goiters. This part of the eMedTV archives explores other Cytomel uses and describes the medication in more detail. Cytomil is a common misspelling of Cytomel.
  • Cytotec 100 Mcg Tablet
    If you develop intolerable side effects while taking Cytotec 200 mcg, you may need a lower dosage. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at when a doctor may prescribe Cytotec 100 mcg tablets. A link to more details on this drug is also included.
  • Cytotec 200 Mcg
    The recommended dosage of Cytotec is 200 mcg taken four times daily. As explained in this eMedTV page, your amount may be lowered if you develop intolerable side effects. A link to more information on dosing instructions is also provided.
  • Cytotec Abortion
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Cytotec to certain women who want to terminate a pregnancy. This eMedTV article offers a brief description on when Cytotec is used to cause an abortion and provides a link to more details on uses of the drug.
  • Cytotec and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Cytotec (misoprostol) passes through breast milk and might cause side effects in a nursing infant. This article provides a closer look at why taking Cytotec while breastfeeding may not be safe in some cases.
  • Cytotec and Pregnancy
    A woman should not take Cytotec (misoprostol) if she is pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant. As this eMedTV page explains, women must have a pregnancy test before they take this drug and use an effective form of birth control during treatment.
  • Cytotec Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, your Cytotec dose will depend on how you respond to this medication. This page discusses how your doctor will determine if you need a lower dosage and lists tips on how to avoid certain side effects.
  • Cytotec Drug Information
    Cytotec can prevent stomach ulcers in people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, as this eMedTV page explains, your doctor needs information on your medical issues and other drugs you are taking to ensure safe treatment.
  • Cytotec Drug Uses
    Adults who are taking certain pain relievers and have a risk for ulcers may use Cytotec. This eMedTV segment discusses more specific reasons this drug may be recommended, as well as how it works. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Cytotec for Induction of Labor
    Women who must have a labor induction may receive Cytotec to help cause uterine contractions. This eMedTV article explains, however, that this is considered an "off-label" (unapproved) use for the drug and may cause dangerous complications in some women.
  • Cytotec Heavy Bleeding
    If you use Cytotec to induce labor or end a pregnancy, you may have an increased risk for heavy bleeding. This eMedTV page explains how heavy bleeding following Cytotec use may indicate a tear in the lining of the uterus, which can cause complications.
  • Cytotec Indications
    As discussed in this eMedTV resource, Cytotec is a prescription medication used to prevent stomach ulcers in adults taking certain pain relievers. This page takes a closer look at Cytotec indications, including possible "off-label" (unapproved) uses.
  • Cytotec Information
    If you are taking certain pain relievers and are at risk for ulcers, your doctor may prescribe Cytotec. This eMedTV page contains more information on Cytotec, including how it works, side effects, and dosing tips. A link to more details is also included.
  • Cytotec Medication Information
    A doctor may prescribe Cytotec to prevent ulcers in adults taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This eMedTV resource explores Cytotec, with information on how this medication works, when to take it, and how to avoid potential side effects.
  • Cytotec Side Effects
    Abdominal (stomach) pain and diarrhea are the most commonly reported Cytotec side effects. This eMedTV segment describes other reactions that occurred during clinical trials, with detailed lists of common, rare, and potentially serious problems.
  • Cytotec Vaginal Use
    When used vaginally, Cytotec can help stimulate contractions to induce labor or cause an abortion. This eMedTV resource further explores this "off-label" (unapproved) use for Cytotec and provides a link to learn more about the uses for this drug.
  • Cytotek
    Cytotec is a drug licensed to prevent stomach ulcers in people taking certain pain relievers. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Cytotek is a common misspelling of Cytotec.
  • Cytoxin
    Cytoxan is a chemotherapy medication used for treating leukemia, lymphomas, and other types of cancer. This eMedTV segment covers other uses for the drug and explains what side effects may occur. Cytoxin is a common misspelling of Cytoxan.
  • Dabigatran FDA Approval
    Dabigatran is specifically designed to prevent strokes and blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation. This eMedTV page further discusses what dabigatran is used for, including details on its recent approval by the FDA and how it works.
  • Dabigatran Therapy
    As this eMedTV page explains, dabigatran therapy can help prevent strokes and blood clots in people with atrial fibrillation. This article also covers some important information to be aware of before beginning treatment and links to more details.
  • Dacarbazin
    A doctor may prescribe dacarbazine to treat Hodgkin's disease or malignant melanoma in adults. This eMedTV article examines this chemotherapy drug, including how it is given and potential side effects. Dacarbazin is a common misspelling of dacarbazine.
  • Dacarbazine
    Dacarbazine can help treat malignant melanoma and Hodgkin's disease. This eMedTV Web selection presents an overview of this chemotherapy drug, including how it works, dosing information, safety precautions, and links to more details.
  • Dacarbazine 200 Mg
    Available in the form of an intravenous injection, dacarbazine comes in two strengths (200 mg and 100 mg). This eMedTV page discusses the factors that affect your dosage and offers some tips on receiving this drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Dacarbozine
    As this page of the eMedTV Web site explains, certain types of cancer may be treated with dacarbazine. This page describes specific uses, lists potential side effects, and covers dosing tips. Dacarbozine is a common misspelling of dacarbazine.
  • Daily Levitra
    Rather than taken daily, Levitra is taken one hour prior to sexual activity. This page of the eMedTV archives provides a brief overview of dosing guidelines for Levitra, including the usual starting dose and factors that affect the amount prescribed.
  • Dalfampridine
    Dalfampridine is a medication prescribed to treat walking difficulties caused by multiple sclerosis. This eMedTV resource describes this product in detail, further exploring its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Daliresp
    Daliresp is a medicine prescribed to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This eMedTV page offers an overview of this drug, including details on how it works, results from clinical trials on its effectiveness, and potential side effects.
  • Daltiparin
    A healthcare provider may prescribe dalteparin to help prevent or treat blood clots. This eMedTV Web article highlights possible side effects and offers some general precautions for the medication. Daltiparin is a common misspelling of dalteparin.
  • Damiana Herb Information
    This page of the eMedTV library briefly discusses damiana, an herbal remedy that can supposedly help relieve a wide range of conditions. This segment lists a few of those uses and describes important safety concerns, with a link to more information.
  • Dangers of Arthrotec
    Kidney damage, anemia, and strokes are some of the potential dangers with Arthrotec. This eMedTV segment lists other possible problems that may occur with this drug, and explains why it should be taken only for the shortest amount of time possible.
  • Dangers of Depo-Provera Shot
    Depo-Provera can cause a number of serious complications, including seizures and blood clots. This eMedTV resource further explores the potential dangers of receiving the Depo-Provera shot, including important details on who should not use this drug.
  • Dangers of Glipizide
    If you have liver or kidney problems, it may not be safe for you to take a normal dosage of glipizide. This eMedTV page briefly explores the dangers of glipizide, including safety issues to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment.
  • Dangers of Methadone
    You may not be able to safely use methadone if you have certain medical problems, such as kidney disease. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential methadone dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with this medication.
  • Dangers of Ritalin
    Although Ritalin may help treat ADHD and narcolepsy, this medication is not free of complications. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at possible dangers of Ritalin use, including potentially serious side effects and consequences of abusing this drug.
  • Dangers of Tdap Vaccine
    Tdap may cause potentially serious side effects, such as severe arm swelling or a high fever. This eMedTV resource explores other potential dangers of Tdap vaccine and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before receiving the vaccine.
  • Dantrium 100 Mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, taking 100 mg of Dantrium three or four times a day may help treat muscle spasticity or a rare condition called malignant hyperthermia. This resource describes uses of this drug, various forms, and general dosing information.
  • Dantrium 25 Mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe 25-mg Dantrium capsules to treat muscle spasticity caused by certain neurological conditions. This article takes a brief look at some dosing guidelines for this drug and offers a link to more details.
  • Dantrium Dosage
    A person's Dantrium dose is highly individualized, based on which product they are using and other factors. This eMedTV page explains how your dosage is determined and describes some of the factors that may affect your specific amount.
  • Dantrium Intravenous 20 Mg
    This eMedTV page explains that if you have a rare condition called malignant hyperthermia, your doctor may prescribe 20 mg of Dantrium given intravenously. This page explores what this drug is used for and how it is given. It also links to more details.
  • Dantrium Side Effects
    People using Dantrium may develop side effects, such as fatigue, dizziness, and general ill feelings. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at some of the commonly reported reactions to this drug, as well as serious complications that may also occur.
  • Dantrium Uses
    This eMedTV resource discusses how Dantrium works to treat muscle spasticity and malignant hyperthermia. This article closely examines what Dantrium is used for, whether it is safe for use in children, and when it may be prescribed for unapproved reasons.
  • Dantrolen
    As this eMedTV resource explains, adults and children with certain muscle problems may benefit from dantrolene. This article describes specific uses and lists some of the potential side effects. Dantrolen is a common misspelling of dantrolene.
  • Dantrolene for Pain
    If you have certain types of muscle pain, dantrolene may be of some relief. This eMedTV Web selection further describes this unapproved use for the drug and provides a link to more detailed information on other possible approved and unapproved uses.
  • Dantroline
    Dantrolene is prescribed for people who have muscle spasms or a condition known as malignant hyperthermia. This eMedTV page explores this prescription drug, including uses and possible side effects. Dantroline is a common misspelling of dantrolene.
  • Daptacel Vaccine Information
    Daptacel is used to provide protection against tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), and diphtheria. This eMedTV segment offers more information about the Daptacel vaccine, including details on how it works and when to get your child vaccinated.
  • Daravon
    Darvon is a prescription medication that is used to treat mild to moderate pain. This page from the eMedTV library explains how often Darvon should be taken and lists potential side effects of the drug. Daravon is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darone
    Darvon is a prescription narcotic pain medication. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes Darvon in more detail, lists some of its potential side effects, and links to more information about the drug. Darone is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darvacette
    Darvocet is a prescription pain reliever that contains a narcotic drug. This eMedTV resource describes Darvocet in more detail and provides general warnings and precautions for this medication. Darvacette is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvan
    Available only by prescription, Darvon is used to treat pain. This selection from the eMedTV archives explains when and how to take Darvon and lists some of the potential side effects of the drug. Darvan is a common misspelling of Darvon.
  • Darvicet
    Darvocet is a narcotic drug that can be prescribed to help relieve mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV article offers general warnings for this drug and lists some of its potential side effects. Darvicet is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvocet A500
    The recommended starting dosage for Darvocet A500 is one tablet every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV article also offers dosing guidelines for Darvocet-N 50 and Darvocet-N 100, and includes warnings on limiting your acetaminophen intake.
  • Darvocet Abuse
    There are many dangers associated with Darvocet abuse and addiction. As this article from the eMedTV Web site explains, taking more Darvocet than recommended can result in breathing problems, extreme drowsiness, coma, and even death.
  • Darvocet and Pregnancy
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment contains more information on pregnancy and Darvocet, and describes some of the problems that may occur if a pregnant woman uses this drug.
  • Darvocet and Soma
    It is generally recommended that you do not combine Darvocet and Soma (a muscle relaxant). This eMedTV resource describes the problems that may occur if these drugs are taken together and lists other medications that may cause an interaction.
  • Darvocet Dangers
    A Darvocet overdose (either accidental or intentional) can be lethal within 15 minutes. This page on the eMedTV Web site covers other Darvocet dangers and describes some of the common side effects that have been reported with this medication.
  • Darvocet Generic Names
    There are currently both brand-name and generic versions of Darvocet. Generic names of this medication, as this eMedTV resource explains, include propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen, propoxyphene/APAP, and propoxyphene-N/APAP.
  • Darvocet Indications
    Darvocet is a prescription narcotic drug used for relieving mild to moderate pain (with or without a fever). This eMedTV article discusses Darvocet indications in more detail and explains whether there are any recommended "off-label" uses for this drug.
  • Darvocet Information
    Darvocet is a prescription medicine used for relieving mild to moderate pain. This eMedTV segment provides more Darvocet information, including a list of potential side effects of the drug and information on general warnings and precautions.
  • Darvocet Ingredients
    Darvocet (propoxyphene/acetaminophen) contains numerous ingredients. As this eMedTV resource explains, the two main Darvocet ingredients are propoxyphene napsylate and acetaminophen (although the drug is also made up of various inactive ingredients).
  • Darvocet Oral
    There are three types of Darvocet oral tablets (Darvocet-N 50, Darvocet-N 100, and Darvocet A500). This eMedTV article explains how Darvocet works for relieving pain and describes the various components of this medication.
  • Darvocet Pain Medicine
    This eMedTV Web page talks about Darvocet, a pain medicine. This article offers an overview of how Darvocet works, lists what strengths this drug comes in, and discusses some of its potential side effects.
  • Darvocet Pain Reliever
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Darvocet (a pain reliever) contains both a narcotic and acetaminophen. This article covers the effects of Darvocet, describes how the medication works, and explains what you should be aware of before using a narcotic.
  • Darvocet Pills
    Generally, Darvocet pills are taken every four hours as needed for pain. This article from the eMedTV site describes the effects of Darvocet, lists potential side effects of the drug, and offers some precautions and warnings for this medicine.
  • Darvocet Risks
    Darvocet is a controlled substance that has a significant potential to be abused. This portion of the eMedTV site discusses other Darvocet risks, lists possible side effects of the drug, and offers general warnings and precautions for this medicine.
  • Darvocet Safety
    Darvocet should be prescribed cautiously to people with depression or suicidal tendencies. This eMedTV segment contains other important Darvocet safety information, including a list of side effects or complications that may occur with this drug.
  • Darvocet Tablets
    There are three different types of Darvocet tablets (Darvocet-N 50, Darvocet-N 100, and Darvocet A500). This eMedTV resource offers dosing recommendations for these various products and explains how often this painkiller should be taken.
  • Darvocet Withdrawal Symptoms
    Potential Darvocet withdrawal symptoms include insomnia, diarrhea, and insomnia. This page from the eMedTV archives offers information on why withdrawal occurs and explains how you can help limit withdrawal symptoms from Darvocet.
  • Darvocet Withdrawl
    Symptoms of Darvocet withdrawal may include shakiness, insomnia, and diarrhea. This article on the eMedTV Web site explains why people may experience withdrawal from this drug. Darvocet withdrawl is a common misspelling of Darvocet withdrawal.
  • Darvocett
    Darvocet is a pain medication that is classified as a controlled substance. This eMedTV segment covers specific uses of the drug and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using it. Darvocett is a common misspelling of Darvocet.
  • Darvon 65 Mg Capsules
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe Darvon to treat mild to moderate pain. For Darvon 65-mg capsules, the usual dosing schedule is one capsule every four hours as needed for pain relief. This page offers other dosing tips for this drug.
  • Darvon Dosage
    The recommended Darvon dosage is typically one capsule taken every four hours as needed for pain. This eMedTV page takes a look at the factors that may affect your dosage, and lists some general dosing tips to be aware of when taking this drug.
  • Darvon Medication Information
    This selection from the eMedTV archives provides important information on Darvon, a prescription pain medication. This segment discusses the drug's potential for abuse, its approved uses, and dosing. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Darvon Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Darvon include dizziness, drowsiness, and nausea. This eMedTV page gives an overview of possible side effects, listing common ones as well as potentially serious side effects that may require medical care.
  • Darvon-N
    Darvon-N is a medication prescribed to relieve pain. This eMedTV page offers an in-depth look at this drug, including information on how it works to treat mild-to-moderate pain, possible side effects, dosing tips, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Dasatenib
    Dasatinib is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to slow down the progression of certain types of leukemia. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of specific uses for this drug and links to more details. Dasatenib is a common misspelling of dasatinib.
  • Dasatinib and Coughing
    If you are taking dasatinib, you may develop coughing as a side effect. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at this and other possible side effects, including details on when to contact your doctor. A link to more information is also included.
  • Datrol
    Detrol is a prescription medication used for treating an overactive bladder. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at Detrol, including possible side effects and general precautions. Datrol is a common misspelling of Detrol.
  • Daypro Dosage
    The recommended dose of Daypro for treating pain and inflammation seen with osteoarthritis is 1200 mg a day. This eMedTV resource also discusses dosing for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and offers tips and precautions for taking the drug.
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