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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Coreg Uses - Cure for Pink Eye

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Coreg Uses to Cure for Pink Eye. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Corgard
    Corgard is a prescription drug approved for the treatment of high blood pressure and angina. This eMedTV Web page describes how the medication works, explains what side effects may occur, and offers dosing information for the medicine.
  • Corguard
    Corgard is a medication used to treat angina and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article describes Corgard in more detail, explains how it works, and offers general warnings and precautions for the drug. Corguard is a common misspelling of Corgard.
  • Corisoprodol
    Carisoprodol is a muscle relaxant used to relieve discomfort caused by muscle spasms. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of carisoprodol and offers general dosing information for the drug. Corisprodol is a common misspelling of carisoprodol.
  • Cormax
    Cormax is prescribed to treat a variety of skin problems, such as dermatitis, eczema, and psoriasis. This eMedTV resource explains how this steroid works to treat skin inflammation, lists possible side effects, and explains how to use this product.
  • Cormax Cream
    As this eMedTV article explains, Cormax cream has been discontinued, and the medicine is only available as an ointment or topical solution. This page describes uses of this drug and how to apply it. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Cormax Ointment
    A doctor may prescribe Cormax ointment to treat psoriasis, poison ivy, or other skin problems. This eMedTV Web page offers some details on what this medication is prescribed for, how it works, and dosing tips. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Cormax Scalp Solution
    If you have a skin condition like eczema on your scalp, you may benefit from Cormax topical solution. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of what this medicine is used for and how to use it. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Cornary Artery Disease
    Coronary artery disease, the number-one killer of both men and women in America, is largely preventable. This eMedTV page lists some specific tips on preventing the condition. Cornary artery disease is a common misspelling of coronary artery disease.
  • Coronary Angioplasty
    If you have blocked coronary arteries, you may benefit from a procedure called angioplasty. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this topic, with information on how an angioplasty is performed, possible complications, and more.
  • Coronary Artery Disease
    Coronary artery disease is the most common type of heart disease. This section of the eMedTV library provides an overview of this form of heart disease, including information about risk factors, symptoms, treatment options, and prevention strategies.
  • Coronary Atherectomy
    With an atherectomy, coronary arteries are cleared of blockages, and sometimes a stent is placed as well. This eMedTV resource briefly describes what happens during this procedure and lists possible complications to be aware of.
  • Correg
    Coreg is a prescription medicine that is used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV segment features a brief overview of Coreg and a link to more detailed information. Correg is a common misspelling of Coreg.
  • Cortaslim
    CortiSlim is a weight-loss supplement that may suppress the appetite and increase metabolism. This eMedTV page briefly explores CortiSlim's effectiveness and provides a link to more detailed information. Cortaslim is a common misspelling of CortiSlim.
  • CortiSlim
    CortiSlim is a weight loss product that is available without a prescription. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a list of various CortiSlim products, describes how the products may work, and discusses their safety and effectiveness.
  • CortiSlim Diet Pills
    This part of the eMedTV site discusses CortiSlim, a line of diet pills taken for weight loss. This article provides a brief overview of how they are thought to work, as well as a list of potential side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • Cosept
    People who have high eye pressure due to certain medical conditions may benefit from treatment with Cosopt. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of this drug, with a link to more information on it. Cosept is a common misspelling of Cosopt.
  • Cosopt
    Cosopt is a combination medication used to treat a certain kind of glaucoma as well as ocular hypertension. This eMedTV segment provides detailed information on this prescription eye drop, such as dosing, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Cosopt and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that even though Cosopt is a pregnancy Category C drug, it could still be recommended if the benefits outweigh the risks. This article also describes what happened when this medicine was used in pregnant animal studies.
  • Cosopt Eye Drops
    High eye pressure due to glaucoma or ocular hypertension can be treated with Cosopt eye drops. This eMedTV Web segment provides a brief overview of this prescription drug, including how it works, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Cosopt Side Effects
    Although the medication is generally well tolerated, some people do experience side effects with Cosopt. This eMedTV resource lists commonly reported reactions to this drug, as well as potentially serious side effects that require medical care.
  • Could Ciprodex Be Used for the Eyes?
    If you are wondering if Ciprodex could be used for the eyes, this eMedTV article has the answer. This resource takes a quick look at why Ciprodex ear drops should not be used in the eyes or on the skin, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Could You List the Foods That Are Highest in Cholesterol?
    This selection from the eMedTV library provides a simple list of foods that are highest in cholesterol. It also provides some easy tips to help you remember which foods are high and low in cholesterol and discusses other healthy food choices.
  • Could Zoladex Shots Cause Anemia?
    Fatigue, pale skin, and headaches are possible signs of anemia that may occur while using Zoladex. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at whether shots of Zoladex could cause anemia and links to a more detailed list of possible side effects of this drug.
  • Coumaden
    Coumadin is an anticoagulant drug used for treating and preventing blood clots. This eMedTV article explains how treatment works and offers general warnings and precautions for the medicine. Coumaden is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumadin
    Coumadin is an anticoagulant drug often prescribed to treat or prevent blood clots. This article on the eMedTV site describes the effects of this medication, explains how it works, and lists the various forms and strengths that it comes in.
  • Coumadin and Alcohol
    Coumadin interacts with many different foods and beverages. As this eMedTV page explains, there is a known interaction between Coumadin and alcohol. This article explains how excessive alcohol use can affect this drug's effectiveness.
  • Coumadin and Ibuprofen
    Ibuprofen is almost always listed among the medications that interact with Coumadin. As this eMedTV article explains, combining Coumadin and ibuprofen can increase the risk of bleeding and increase INR (a test used to monitor Coumadin).
  • Coumadin Blood Thinner
    Although often called a blood thinner, Coumadin does not actually thin the blood. This article from the eMedTV archives explains what Coumadin is used for, describes how it works, and offers general warnings and precautions for this medication.
  • Coumadin Diet
    Coumadin is known to interact with many different foods and beverages. This page from the eMedTV archives describes the various components of a Coumadin diet and explains whether there are certain foods to avoid during the treatment process.
  • Coumadin Drug Interactions
    Many different drugs in several different categories can interact with Coumadin. Drug interactions, as this eMedTV page explains, can lead to life-threatening consequences, such as increasing your risk of strokes, blood clots, and internal bleeding.
  • Coumadin Foods
    Many foods interact with Coumadin; foods that are high in vitamin K could cause problems. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses the interaction between Coumadin and vitamin K, and explores the potential dangers of these food interactions.
  • Coumadin Information
    Coumadin is an anticoagulant drug approved for treating and preventing blood clots. This page from the eMedTV library offers more Coumadin information, including important warnings and precautions that you should be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Coumadin Medication Information
    Coumadin is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment and prevention of blood clots. This eMedTV resource provides more Coumadin medication information, including details on how it works and important warnings and precautions for the drug.
  • Coumadin Oral
    Coumadin is a medication licensed to treat and prevent blood clots. As this eMedTV segment explains, there are two forms of Coumadin: oral tablets and injection (although this form is rarely used). This article describes the drug in more detail.
  • Coumadin Overdose
    Unlike with many other medications, even a slight overdose of Coumadin can be extremely dangerous. This eMedTV segment discusses the most important effect of taking too much Coumadin and explores the different ways that an overdose can occur.
  • Coumadin Side Affects
    Potential Coumadin side effects include fatigue, diarrhea, or dizziness. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects, including serious ones that require medical attention. Coumadin side affects is a common misspelling of Coumadin side effects.
  • Coumadin Side Effects
    Vomiting, bloating, and fatigue are some of the bothersome but usually not serious side effects of Coumadin. This eMedTV Web page also lists potentially life-threatening Coumadin side effects that should be reported immediately to your doctor.
  • Coumadin Therapy
    While Coumadin can be a life-saving drug, it can also cause life-threatening side effects. As this eMedTV article explains, in order to minimize these risks during Coumadin therapy, your doctor will monitor you on a regular basis using blood tests.
  • Coumadin Toxicity
    While Coumadin can be a life-saving medication, it can cause significant toxicity. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists some of the signs of Coumadin toxicity, explores the potential dangers of these problems, and explains how they can be treated.
  • Coumadin Versus Warfarin
    Many people want to know the difference between Coumadin versus warfarin. As this eMedTV page explains, there is no difference. Warfarin and Coumadin are different names for the same medication (warfarin is simply the generic name for Coumadin).
  • Coumadine
    Coumadin is a prescription drug licensed to prevent or treat blood clots. This eMedTV page describes how the drug works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Coumadine is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumadon
    Coumadin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat various types of blood clots. This eMedTV Web page covers these uses in more detail and describes the effects of this anticoagulant drug. Coumadon is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumdin
    Coumadin is a prescription anticoagulant drug used to prevent and treat blood clots. This eMedTV segment describes this medication in more detail and offers information on how it works. Coumdin is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumeden
    Many doctors will prescribe Coumadin to treat or prevent blood clots. This eMedTV article offers important warnings and precautions for Coumadin and explains what you should expect while taking this drug. Coumeden is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumedin
    Coumadin is a prescription medication used to treat and prevent blood clots. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Coumedin is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumiden
    Coumadin is a medicine commonly used for preventing or treating blood clots. This article on the eMedTV Web site offers some general information on what to expect while taking this anticoagulant drug. Coumiden is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Coumidin
    Coumadin is a prescription medicine approved to prevent and treat blood clots. This eMedTV article explains how this medication works and offers general warnings and precautions for this anticoagulant. Coumidin is a common misspelling of Coumadin.
  • Covaryx
    Covaryx is a prescription testosterone-and-estrogen drug used to treat night sweats or hot flashes. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at Covaryx and its uses, including the drug's effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Cow Pox
    Cowpox is a viral infection most commonly spread through direct contact with an infected cow's teat. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of the condition and links to more information. Cow pox is a common misspelling of cowpox.
  • Cow Pox Disease
    Cowpox is a viral infection that is most often found among wild rodents in Europe. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of cowpox, which is a disease rarely seen in humans. Cow pox disease is a common misspelling and variation of cowpox.
  • Cowpox
    Cowpox is a rare disease that is commonly spread through direct contact with an ulcer on a cow's teat. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at this condition and its causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Cozaar
    Cozaar is a medication that is used to treat high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at Cozaar and its specific uses, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Cozaar and Depression
    Depression is a rare but possible side effect that occurs in less than 1 percent of patients taking Cozaar. This eMedTV Web page discusses Cozaar and depression, including an overview of the possible symptoms of depression.
  • Cozaar and Weight Gain
    As this eMedTV page explains, weight gain is a rare but possible side effect that can occur in people taking Cozaar for diabetic nephropathy. This article covers Cozaar and weight gain, including tips on dealing with gradual weight gain.
  • Cozaar Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended starting dosage of Cozaar for diabetic nephropathy treatment is 50 mg once daily. This article also offers dosing recommendations for high blood pressure control and helpful tips for taking the medicine.
  • Cozaar Medication
    This page of the eMedTV site presents some basic information on Cozaar, a medication used for both diabetic nephropathy and high blood pressure. This segment explains how the drug works, dosing guidelines, side effects, and more.
  • Cozaar Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, people taking Cozaar to treat high blood pressure may experience Cozaar side effects such as infection, dizziness, or back pain. This page covers the side effects of Cozaar that can occur in different types of patients.
  • Cozar
    Cozaar is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV page explains the specific uses of Cozaar and offers general dosing information for the drug. Cozar is a common misspelling of Cozaar.
  • Cozzar
    Cozaar is a drug that is prescribed for high blood pressure control and diabetic nephropathy treatment. This eMedTV page further explains what Cozaar is used for and lists potential side effects of the drug. Cozzar is a common misspelling of Cozaar.
  • Cracking Joints
    Some studies show that cracking joints doesn't cause any harm. But as this eMedTV article explains, you should see a healthcare provider if the cracking causes pain. This page describes in detail what makes joints pop or crack.
  • Creon
    Available by prescription only, Creon is approved to treat pancreatic enzyme deficiencies. This eMedTV article presents more information on this medication, including who it is approved for, how to take it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Creon Enzymes
    Taking Creon with each meal can help replace certain enzymes that become low due to certain medical issues. This eMedTV article takes a look at how the drug works, lists dosing tips, and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • CREST
    CREST is an acronym that spells out some of the common symptoms of systemic scleroderma. This selection from the eMedTV library goes into greater detail about these symptoms, and also includes information on the different types of scleroderma.
  • CREST Syndrome
    Limited scleroderma is sometimes known as CREST syndrome (CREST is an acronym for its common symptoms). This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this condition, explaining how it can occur anywhere in the body, but tends to affect the extremities.
  • Crestar
    Crestor is a prescription medication approved to treat high cholesterol. This page on the eMedTV site describes Crestor in more detail, explores the effects of the drug, and explains how it works. Crestar is a common misspelling of Crestor.
  • Crester
    Crestor is a drug used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV segment briefly discusses the prescription medicine, noting in particular its effects and possible side effects. Crester is a common misspelling of Crestor.
  • Crestor
    Crestor is generally prescribed for treating high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This section of the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at the drug, with information on its uses, dosing guidelines, potential side effects, and more.
  • Crestor 10 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, a Crestor 10 mg tablet once daily is the recommended starting dosage for most people treating high cholesterol. This article also discusses certain factors that may increase or decrease your Crestor dosage.
  • Crestor 20 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths of Crestor on the market, the 20 mg tablets are in the middle of the range. This eMedTV Web article explains how Crestor can help treat high cholesterol, and offers tips on when and how to use this medication.
  • Crestor 40 mg
    Of the three strengths of Crestor, the 40 mg dosage is the strongest one available. This eMedTV article explains how Crestor tablets can help treat high cholesterol, offers tips on using this medicine, and describes possible side effects.
  • Crestor 5 mg
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Crestor 5 mg tablets are the lowest dosage available in this particular medication. This page describes general dosing guidelines for this strength of the medication, and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Crestor and Alcohol
    In certain situations, it may not be harmful to take Crestor while consuming moderate amounts of alcohol. This eMedTV page further discusses alcohol and Crestor, including information on what to do if you do decide to drink while taking this medication.
  • Crestor and Grapefruit
    In most cases, Crestor and grapefruit can be consumed together without any significant interactions or undesirable effects. This eMedTV page explains why Crestor is not affected by grapefruit and why other statin drugs are.
  • Crestor and Muscle Pain
    Up to 12.7 percent of people taking Crestor experience muscle pain, a possible symptom of myopathy or rhabdomyolysis. This page of the eMedTV library explores Crestor and muscle pain in detail, including the potential complications of rhabdomyolysis.
  • Crestor Drug Information
    Crestor is a prescription drug used to treat several conditions related to heart disease. This eMedTV Web page provides a brief overview of Crestor drug information, including uses, possible side effects, precautions, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Crestor High Cholesterol Medicine
    Crestor is a prescription medication used for treating several conditions, including high cholesterol. This eMedTV page offers an overview of how Crestor is used as a high cholesterol medicine, including information on how the drug works.
  • Crestor Medication Information
    Crestor is a drug prescribed to treat several conditions, such as high triglycerides and high cholesterol. This eMedTV page offers an overview of Crestor medication, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Crestor Medicine
    People with high cholesterol may be given Crestor, a statin medication. This eMedTV page gives a brief overview of this prescription medicine, explaining how Crestor is taken and some of the side effects that it may cause.
  • Crestor Oral
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Crestor oral tablets may be prescribed to treat several conditions, such as high triglycerides and high cholesterol. This page also describes possible side effects, general precautions, and available strengths.
  • Crestor Side Affects
    Common Crestor side effects may include nausea, joint pain, and headache. This eMedTV page also lists potentially serious side effects of Crestor that require medical attention. Crestor side affects is a common misspelling of Crestor side effects.
  • Crestor Side Effects
    Common side effects of Crestor include muscle tenderness, constipation, and nausea. This selection from the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at the possible side effects of this drug, including what to do if you have problems while taking it.
  • Crestor vs. Lipitor
    While Lipitor and Crestor are similar in many ways, there are some differences between the two drugs. This eMedTV resource offers important information about one versus the other and lists some of their primary differences and similarities.
  • Crixivan
    Crixivan is a medication that is commonly prescribed for treating HIV and AIDS. This article on the eMedTV site explains what you should know before taking this drug, describes how it works, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Crizotinib
    Crizotinib is prescribed to help slow down the progression of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. This eMedTV article presents more details on this medication, with information on how to take it, potential side effects, general safety concerns, and more.
  • Croans Disease
    Crohn's disease, which occurs when the digestive tract becomes inflamed, is usually incurable. This eMedTV page lists symptoms, possible treatment options, and links to more information. Croans disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Crohn's and Pregnancy
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, pregnant women with Crohn's disease are most likely to have flare-ups in the first trimester and right after giving birth. This Web page features a more in-depth discussion of this topic.
  • Crohn's Cure
    There is no proven cure for Crohn's disease. However, as this eMedTV Web page explains, there are strategies that can help relieve symptoms, such as changing one's diet, taking medications, and avoiding stress.
  • Crohn's Disease
    A type of irritable bowel syndrome, Crohn's disease can cause inflammation in the digestive tract. This eMedTV article explains how Crohn's disease affects the digestive system. Symptoms and progression of the disease are also discussed.
  • Crohn's Disease and Research
    Several drugs are currently being tested as possible treatments for Crohn's disease. This eMedTV resource discusses the research being conducted on Crohn's disease, with details on specific medications, such as natalizumab and budesonide.
  • Crohn's Disease Causes
    Researchers have not yet found the exact cause or causes of Crohn's disease. This selection from the eMedTV archives discusses possible causes of this disease, such as infections, heredity, and immune system abnormality.
  • Crohn's Disease Diet
    Crohn's disease cannot be cured with a special "Crohn's disease diet." However, as this eMedTV article explains, eating a well-balanced diet and avoiding certain foods may help alleviate symptoms of Crohn's disease.
  • Crohn's Disease Info
    Looking for info on Crohn's disease? This article from the eMedTV library gives a quick overview of this inflammatory bowel disease, listing some of its most common symptoms. Information is also included on how the illness is diagnosed and treated.
  • Crohn's Disease Information
    A person with Crohn's disease will typically have chronic diarrhea. This eMedTV Web page offers some basic information about Crohn's disease, with details on when it is typically diagnosed and treatment options that can bring relief.
  • Crohn's Disease Medications
    Examples of drugs used to treat Crohn's disease include sulfasalazine, prednisone, and azathioprine. This eMedTV segment features an in-depth look at medications for Crohn's disease, including how they work and possible side effects.
  • Crohn's Disease Surgery
    As this eMedTV article explains, surgery for Crohn's disease may involve procedures such as a strictureplasty, a resection, or a colectomy. This Web page describes the different types of surgery and explains how, unfortunately, surgery is not a cure.
  • Crohn's Disease Symptoms
    The most common Crohn's disease symptoms are chronic diarrhea and abdominal pain. This eMedTV article explains that while signs and symptoms of Crohn's disease are sometimes mild, there are also some severe symptoms (for example, a fever).
  • Crohn's Disease Treatment
    Relief from Crohn's disease symptoms may include medications, surgery, and lifestyle and dietary changes. This eMedTV page explores these options for Crohn's disease treatment in detail and discusses the risks of not treating the condition.
  • Crohn's Symptoms
    For most people with Crohn's, symptoms include such things as diarrhea and abdominal pain (or stomach pain). This eMedTV page describes several symptoms and complications that may occur with Crohn's disease, such as intestinal blockages.
  • Crohn's Treatment
    Dietary changes, medications, and even surgery are often recommended to treat Crohn's disease. This eMedTV resource discusses these options, including the goals of treatment, such as controlling inflammation and relieving symptoms of the disease.
  • Crohns Desease
    Crohn's disease is characterized by inflammation along the digestive tract. This portion of the eMedTV library further describes this condition and provides a link to more information. Crohns desease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Cromalin
    Cromolyn is a prescription drug that is used for treating allergies and asthma. This eMedTV Web page describes cromolyn in more detail and briefly describes how the drug works. Cromalin is a common misspelling of cromolyn.
  • Cromalin
    Cromolyn is a drug used to treat asthma and allergies. This article on the eMedTV Web site briefly discusses the medication and provides a link to more detailed information. Cromalin is a common misspelling of cromolyn.
  • Cromium Picolinate
    This eMedTV page explains that chromium picolinate may help with certain conditions, but more research is necessary. This page also covers possible side effects of chromium picolinate. Cromium picolinate is a common misspelling of chromium picolinate.
  • Cromolyn
    Cromolyn is a prescription medicine often used for the treatment of asthma and allergies. This eMedTV resource lists the various forms of cromolyn that are available, explains how the medicine works, and offers general dosing information.
  • Cromolyn Inhalation
    Cromolyn inhalation is a prescription drug that is used to prevent asthma attacks. This page on the eMedTV site explains how the medication works, offers suggestions on when and how to use the two different forms, discusses side effects, and more.
  • Crones Desease
    Crohn's disease is characterized by patches of inflammation along the digestive tract. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of this condition and provides a link to more information. Crones desease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Crones Diease
    Crohn's disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease. As this eMedTV segment explains, it is characterized by inflammation along the digestive tract, often resulting in diarrhea. Crones diease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Crones Diese
    Characterized by inflammation in the digestive tract, Crohn's disease is incurable -- but it can be treated. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of this condition and its prognosis. Crones diese is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Crones Disease
    Crohn's disease is a condition characterized by inflammation in the digestive tract, resulting in diarrhea. This eMedTV page describes the condition, including information on who it affects. Crones disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • Crones Disease Info
    Crohn's disease is characterized by inflammation that primarily affects the small intestine and colon. This eMedTV page briefly describes the condition, including symptoms. Crones disease info is a common misspelling and variation of Crohn's disease.
  • Crones Disease Symptoms
    This eMedTV segment discusses severe Crohn's disease symptoms (such as unusual fatigue or weakness), as well as common symptoms of the disease (including chronic diarrhea). Crones disease symptoms is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease symptoms.
  • Cronic Back Pain
    Chronic back pain is defined as back pain that persists for more than three months. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of back pain and provides a link to more information. Cronic back pain is a common misspelling and variation of back pain.
  • Cronic Constipation
    People with chronic constipation may have painful bowel movements of dry, hard stool. This eMedTV Web page discusses constipation and offers tips for relieving it. Cronic constipation is a common misspelling and variation of constipation.
  • Cronic Fatigue
    Chronic fatigue occurs when exhaustion or lack of energy lasts for over six months. This eMedTV resource describes the role of certain diseases, hormone levels, and stress in chronic fatigue. Cronic fatigue is a common misspelling of chronic fatigue.
  • Cronic Fatigue Syndrom
    Having chronic fatigue syndrome means more than just being tired. As this eMedTV page explains, this condition is marked by profound tiredness that doesn't improve with rest. Cronic fatigue syndrom is a common misspelling of chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Cronic Fatigue Syndrome
    This eMedTV article explains that chronic fatigue syndrome is a complex condition that currently has no cure. This page also links to more information about the condition. Cronic fatigue syndrome is a common misspelling of chronic fatigue syndrome.
  • Cronic Insomnia
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, a person with chronic insomnia has difficulty sleeping for at least three nights a week, for one month or longer. Cronic insomnia is a common misspelling of chronic insomnia.
  • Cronic Tiredness
    This page of the eMedTV Web site briefly defines chronic fatigue, which can be a symptom of many different conditions, but is often associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. Cronic tiredness is a common misspelling and variation of chronic fatigue.
  • Crons Disease
    Crohn's disease is a condition that causes the digestive tract to become inflamed. This eMedTV article further describes this disease and provides a link to more detailed information. Crons disease is a common misspelling of Crohn's disease.
  • CRP Test for Heart Disease
    As this eMedTV article explains, a CRP (C-reactive protein) test is a simple blood test that is used to show the presence of inflammation in the body. This segment talks about the possible use of a CRP test for heart disease.
  • CRPS
    This segment of the eMedTV archives presents a brief overview of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), a condition characterized by chronic pain and increased skin sensitivity, among other things. This page also describes other symptoms and treatment.
  • Crushing OxyContin Information
    If OxyContin (oxycodone ER) is crushed, it can be very dangerous and could lead to an overdose. As this eMedTV page explains, chewing or crushing the tablets destroys the special slow-release feature of the tablets.
  • Cryselle
    Cryselle is a prescription-only generic birth control pill. This page from the eMedTV library describes how it works, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of the side effects that may occur with this form of birth control.
  • Crystar
    A doctor may prescribe Crestor to help lower cholesterol levels. This eMedTV Web page further explains what Crestor is used for, describes how it works, and links to more information about the drug. Crystar is a common misspelling of Crestor.
  • Ctyic Fibrosis
    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease of the mucus and sweat glands. As this eMedTV article explains, the condition primarily affects the lungs, pancreas, sinuses, and sex organs. Ctyic fibrosis is a common misspelling of cystic fibrosis.
  • Curcumin
    Curcumin supposedly has several medicinal benefits, such as helping with high cholesterol and cancer. This eMedTV page offers an overview of curcumin, including how it may treat several health conditions, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Curcumin Dosage
    There are no clearly established dosing guidelines for curcumin, as research is still in the early stages. This eMedTV article describes the dosages that were used in some studies and explains how to choose a supplement that is right for you.
  • Curcumin Side Effects
    Nausea and diarrhea are among the possible side effects of curcumin. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that some side effects of the supplement can also be more serious and may require medical attention, such as any signs of bleeding.
  • Cure for Achondroplasia
    Although there is no achondroplasia cure, treatments are available to relieve signs and symptoms. This eMedTV article discusses the lack of a cure for this condition and links to other articles on achondroplasia.
  • Cure for Anthrax
    Typically, anthrax is cured with antibiotics. As explained in this eMedTV article, anthrax treatment has a 99 percent success rate when used in cases of cutaneous anthrax; however, the success rate for other types of the disease is lower.
  • Cure for Bubonic Plague
    If a person becomes infected, the best cure for bubonic plague is early treatment. This eMedTV resource offers statistics on the cure rate provided by such treatment and also explains the three techniques used to prevent plague in high-risk areas.
  • Cure for Cholera
    With early and adequate treatment, a cure for cholera is possible in greater than 99 percent of cases. This eMedTV page explains that the cure for cholera typically includes antibiotics and oral or intravenous fluid replacement.
  • Cure for Ebola
    There is no cure for Ebola. Once symptoms of the disease begin, doctors can only offer supportive care. This eMedTV Web segment discusses current treatments for Ebola and explains that a vaccine is being tested that could prevent infections.
  • Cure for Genital Warts
    There is currently no medical or natural cure for genital warts or the disease that causes them (HPV). This eMedTV article focuses on the need for a genital warts cure and what happens if the condition is left untreated.
  • Cure for Gout
    While you may find products on the Internet that claim to cure gout, there is currently no cure. But as this eMedTV page explains, you can take steps to help prevent gout (like maintaining a healthy weight), as well as keep it under control.
  • Cure for Heart Disease
    This eMedTV Web page explains that, while there is no heart disease cure, you can help prevent it or minimize its effects by adopting a healthier lifestyle, which includes regular exercise, routine checkups, and maintaining a healthy weight.
  • Cure for Hepatitis B
    The only cure for hepatitis B, once infection with the virus has occurred, is time. This eMedTV Web page explains that the body can usually kill the virus. This page also lists high-risk situations to avoid as part of hepatitis B prevention.
  • Cure for Hepatitis C
    No cure for hepatitis C is currently available. However, as this eMedTV Web page explains, certain medicines may help the body destroy the virus and reduce swelling and scarring of the liver. Keep in mind that these drugs are not a guaranteed cure.
  • Cure for Mumps
    The best cure for mumps -- aside from not getting it in the first place -- is time. This eMedTV article explains that management for associated symptoms is often the only treatment needed; it also discusses in detail the mumps vaccine.
  • Cure for Pink Eye
    Pink eye that is caused by a virus or allergies cannot be "cured," although symptoms are treated. As this eMedTV page explains, however, there is a bacterial pink eye cure. Using antibiotic drops or ointments for a week or so often resolves the condition.
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