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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Achondroplasia Treatments - Acyclovir Cream

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Achondroplasia Treatments to Acyclovir Cream. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Achondroplasia Treatments
    Options are available to treat the signs, symptoms, or health conditions associated with achondroplasia. This eMedTV article gives a summary of treatments for achondroplasia and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Achondroplastic Dwarfism
    Achodroplastic dwarfism is a bone growth disorder that affects 1 in 15,000 to 40,000 births. This eMedTV article explores the causes and symptoms of achondroplastic dwarfism and lists the health conditions associated with this disorder.
  • Achromycin
    Achromycin is a type of antibiotic used for treating certain bacterial infections and acne. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at how the drug works, its possible side effects, and potential interactions with other medicines.
  • Acia
    Acai products are high in antioxidants and are claimed to provide numerous health benefits. This eMedTV resource explores the possible benefits and discusses the effectiveness of this product. Acia is a common misspelling of acai.
  • Acia Berries
    The acai berry is high in antioxidants and is a popular ingredient in many health foods and drinks. This eMedTV page covers the benefits of acai and explores how it may work for various conditions. Acia berries is a common misspelling of acai berry.
  • Acia Berry
    The acai berry is claimed to provide numerous different health benefits. This eMedTV Web page describes various acai products, explains what they are used for, and explores their effectiveness. Acia berry is a common misspelling of acai berry.
  • Acia Berry Juice
    Products containing acai berry (juice blends and supplements) are claimed to provide many health benefits. This eMedTV page explores the benefits and effectiveness of these products. Acia berry juice is a common variation and misspelling of acai berry.
  • Acia Juice
    Acai juice blends and supplements are claimed to be useful for treating various medical conditions. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of acai berries and covers specific uses. Acia juice is a common variation and misspelling of acai berry.
  • Aciclovir
    This eMedTV segment discusses acyclovir, a drug that is used to treat chickenpox, shingles, and genital herpes. This article offers a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Aciclovir is a common misspelling of acyclovir.
  • Acid Reflux Desease
    Acid reflux disease (or GERD) occurs when stomach acid flows up into the esophagus more often than normal. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of this condition. Acid reflux desease is a common misspelling and variation of GERD.
  • Acifex
    Aciphex is a prescription drug used to treat duodenal ulcers, GERD, and other conditions. This page on the eMedTV site lists other Aciphex uses and explains how the drug works to decrease stomach acid. Acifex is a common misspelling of Aciphex.
  • Acion
    Aceon is a high blood pressure drug licensed for use in adults and children ages six and older. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and offers details on its effects and dosing guidelines. Acion is a common misspelling of Aceon.
  • Aciphax
    Aciphex is a drug often prescribed to treat ulcers, GERD, and erosive esophagitis. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of this drug and also includes a link to more in-depth information. Aciphax is a common misspelling of Aciphex.
  • Aciphex
    Aciphex is a medication that decreases the amount of acid in the stomach. As this eMedTV article explains, it is used to treat GERD, duodenal ulcers, and other conditions. This resource takes an in-depth look at Aciphex and its uses.
  • Aciphex and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, if your doctor recommends breastfeeding while taking Aciphex, be sure to watch for any signs of problems or unusual changes in your baby. This article also stresses discussing the issue with your doctor.
  • Aciphex and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, the FDA considers Aciphex (rabeprazole) a pregnancy Category B drug, meaning it's generally considered safe for women who are expecting. This article takes a closer look at the safety of taking this product during pregnancy.
  • Aciphex Dosing
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended Aciphex dosage for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms is 20 mg once a day for four weeks. This page talks about the dosing of Aciphex for treatment of several medical conditions.
  • Aciphex Drug Interactions
    Digoxin and ketoconazole are two medications that may cause drug interactions with Aciphex. This portion of the eMedTV library describes these and other possible reactions that people should be aware of while taking Aciphex.
  • Aciphex Generic
    You can now buy one version of Aciphex (rabeprazole sodium) in generic form. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at the generic version, with details on how it compares to brand-name Aciphex, who makes it, and more.
  • Aciphex Medication
    This eMedTV resource provides information on Aciphex, a medication prescribed to treat various conditions, such as GERD and duodenal ulcers. This page gives a brief overview of possible side effects and what your doctor needs to know.
  • Aciphex Overdose
    In animal studies, very large doses of Aciphex led to coma, watery diarrhea, and other symptoms. This eMedTV Web page offers more details on what you can expect from an overdose of Aciphex, including information on treatment options.
  • Aciphex Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV resource includes Aciphex precautions and warnings that people who are taking Aciphex should be aware of. For example, if you have liver disease, your doctor may use caution when treating you with Aciphex.
  • Aciphex Side Effects
    Common Aciphex side effects include headache, sore throat, and diarrhea. This part of the eMedTV archives talks about possible side effects of Aciphex. However, it is important to note that not everyone will experience Aciphex side effects.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle
    Aciphex Sprinkle is a prescription drug licensed for the treatment of GERD. This eMedTV Web selection contains more details on this medication, with information on how it works, when and how to take it, and side effects that may occur.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle and Breastfeeding
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, it may be advisable to avoid using Aciphex Sprinkle (rabeprazole sprinkle) while breastfeeding. This article discusses whether the drug passes through breast milk and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Aciphex Sprinkle (rabeprazole sprinkle) is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This page explores this topic in more detail, including animal research that has been done and what your doctor may recommend.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the Aciphex Sprinkle dose you receive will be based on several factors, such as your weight and your response to the drug. This page covers how this drug is taken and offers tips on how to get the most out of each dose.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to take certain supplements, medications, or other products with Aciphex Sprinkle. This eMedTV page examines how drug interactions with Aciphex Sprinkle can cause serious side effects. It also discusses how to avoid these problems.
  • Aciphex Sprinkle Medication Information
    This eMedTV page explains that before you can take Aciphex Sprinkle, your doctor will need information on your medical history and other medications you are taking. More details are covered, such as how the drug is taken and what it is used for.
  • Acitretin
    Acitretin is a prescription medication licensed to treat severe psoriasis in adults. This eMedTV resource gives an overview of this medicine, describing possible side effects, general dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Acivex
    Aciphex is a medicine licensed to treat conditions within the stomach, intestines, and esophagus. This eMedTV segment further explains what Aciphex is used for and lists potential side effects of the drug. Acivex is a common misspelling of Aciphex.
  • Ackne
    This part of the eMedTV library discusses acne, a common skin disease characterized by several pimples occurring in the same area. This article covers the causes, symptoms, and prevention of this disease. Ackne is a common misspelling of acne.
  • ACL Reconstruction
    ACL reconstruction is a surgery in which a torn anterior cruciate ligament is replaced with an ACL graft. This eMedTV page describes the procedure in detail, lists various types of grafts that are available, and explains the benefits of the surgery.
  • ACL Repair
    If you have a torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament), reconstruction surgery may be necessary. This eMedTV page offers information on how a torn ACL is repaired and whether it is a safe and effective surgery. A link to more details is also included.
  • ACL Surgery
    During an ACL surgery, a torn ligament in the knee is removed and replaced with a graft. This eMedTV Web page explains the procedure in detail, including the different types of grafts, where they come from, and what to expect.
  • ACL Surgery Recovery
    A crucial part of ACL surgery recovery is plenty of rest in the initial week, followed by physical therapy. This eMedTV page explains what to expect during recovery, including follow-up visits, possible symptoms, and when physical therapy begins.
  • Aclidinium
    Inhaling aclidinium twice daily can help treat certain types of long-term breathing problems. This eMedTV article presents a comprehensive overview of this prescription drug, including specific uses, details on how it works, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Aclovate
    Aclovate is a medicine prescribed to treat certain skin conditions in adults and children age one and older. This eMedTV resource presents an overview of this topical steroid, including specific uses, how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Aclovate and Pregnancy
    The skin medicine Aclovate (alclometasone) may not be the best choice for women who are pregnant. This eMedTV Web selection examines the research that has been done, including how it may increase the risk for birth defects and other serious problems.
  • Aclovate Ointment
    A doctor may prescribe Aclovate ointment or cream to treat skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema. This eMedTV article describes how this skin medicine works to relieve itching and inflammation. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Acne
    Acne occurs when several oil gland follicles become clogged with sebum, dead skin cells, and bacteria. This eMedTV page discusses the types, causes, and treatment of this condition, and offers tips for prevention, as well as proper care of your skin.
  • Acne and Propecia
    In studies of people taking Propecia, acne was not reported as either a common or rare side effect. This eMedTV Web page discusses acne and Propecia, and also describes the clinical trials used to document possible Propecia side effects.
  • Acne Cream Differin
    Your doctor may prescribe Differin cream for acne treatment. This page from the eMedTV Web archives further describes the effects of Differin, explains how this particular acne medicine works, and links to more detailed information.
  • Acne Information
    This segment of the eMedTV library provides some basic information on acne. It describes what causes this condition, lists the different types, discusses the recommended treatment, and addresses a few myths, with a link for those who want to learn more.
  • Acne Medications
    As this eMedTV article explains, topical acne drugs are often recommended for those with mild acne. Prescription medications may be prescribed for people with more severe acne. This resource offers an in-depth look at the medications used for acne.
  • Acne Myths
    There are many myths that link acne to things like poor hygiene, stress, and certain foods. This eMedTV resource debunks some of the more popular acne myths and includes a link to more information about true acne causes.
  • Acne Prevention
    You may be able to prevent acne breakouts through good skin care and avoiding excessive sun exposure. This eMedTV article discusses these and other acne prevention methods in detail and also includes a link to an article on treatment options.
  • Acne Research
    As this eMedTV article explains, scientists conducting acne research are studying potential new treatments for the condition, including drugs and laser treatment. Other areas of research are also discussed and links to more information are provided.
  • Acne Skin Care
    As this eMedTV page explains, proper skin care for acne includes gently washing your skin with a mild cleanser twice a day, shaving carefully, and avoiding excessive sun exposure. This page lists a number of ways to care for skin that is prone to acne.
  • Acne Treatment
    Over-the-counter lotions, prescription creams, oral medications, and surgery are all acne treatments. This eMedTV Web page describes each form of treatment in more detail, including what types of acne they are best suited for.
  • Acoustic Neuroma
    An acoustic neuroma is a noncancerous, slow-growing tumor that grows from certain nerves of the inner ear. This eMedTV article discusses this serious condition in detail, including its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and more.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Surgery
    The goal of acoustic neuroma surgery is to maintain hearing while removing the entire tumor. This eMedTV article discusses this procedure in detail, including possible alternatives and addresses possible complications and the recovery process.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Surgery Recovery
    The length of a person's acoustic neuroma surgery recovery depends on a few factors, but generally requires 4 to 6 days in the hospital. The information in this eMedTV article covers the process of acoustic neuroma surgery recovery in detail.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Symptoms
    Ringing in the ear, high-tone hearing loss, dizziness, are some of the early symptoms of acoustic neuroma. This eMedTV article explores the different acoustic neuroma symptoms and explains what to do if they occur.
  • Acoustic Neuroma Treatment
    Acoustic neuroma treatment options can include surgical removal of the tumor, radiation, or watchful waiting. The various acoustic neuroma treatment options are described in this eMedTV article and links to additional information are provided.
  • Acoustic Neuromas
    This eMedTV page explains how acoustic neuromas (tumors that develop from nerves in the inner ear) can lead to hearing loss, dizziness, and headaches. Treatment options and a possible genetic link are also discussed.
  • Acromegalia
    Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder characterized by abnormal growth of the hands and feet. As this eMedTV page explains, acromegaly is usually caused by a benign tumor of the pituitary gland. Acromegalia is more commonly known as acromegaly.
  • Acromegalie
    As this page from the eMedTV Web site explains, acromegaly occurs when the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone. This article also covers possible causes and symptoms of acromegaly. Acromegalie is a common misspelling of acromegaly.
  • Acromegaly
    Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results when the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone. This eMedTV article discusses this condition in detail, including information on possible symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Acromegaly Symptoms
    A person with acromegaly may experience abnormal growth and swelling of the hands and feet. This eMedTV page covers the most common signs and symptoms of acromegaly and includes information on why acromegaly is sometimes confused with other conditions.
  • Acromeglia
    Acromegaly is caused when the pituitary gland produces too much growth hormone. This eMedTV Web article takes a further look at acromegaly, including possible causes and symptoms. Acromeglia is a common misspelling of acromegaly.
  • Actanel Side Effects
    Common side effects of Actonel include stomach pain and back pain. This segment of the eMedTV library provides information on these and other side effects of Actonel. Actanel side effects is a common misspelling of Actonel side effects.
  • Actemra
    Actemra is a drug approved to treat arthritis. This eMedTV article explains this prescription medication in more detail, including how it works, how often it is injected, possible side effects, and more.
  • Actenol
    Actonel is a prescription medicine approved for several osteoporosis-related uses. This eMedTV resource covers some specific uses for the medication and lists side effects that may occur during treatment. Actenol is a common misspelling of Actonel.
  • Acteq
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a doctor may prescribe Actiq to treat breakthrough cancer pain. This page also lists possible side effects of the drug and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Acteq is a common misspelling of Actiq.
  • Actifed
    Actifed is a non-prescription medication used to treat allergies and the common cold. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at this drug, including information on how it works, potential side effects, and possible safety concerns.
  • Actifed Dosage
    Actifed is typically taken once every four hours, not to exceed six tablets in 24 hours. This eMedTV Web segment provides more information on the recommended Actifed dosage, including tips on when and how to effectively use this medication.
  • Actifed for Children
    When using Actifed in children, you should not give the medication to a child under 12 years old. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses Actifed uses in children and adults, including information on the symptoms the drug is used to treat.
  • Actifed Medicine
    This eMedTV article explains that Actifed, a medicine that contains a decongestant and an antihistamine, is used to treat symptoms of allergies and the common cold. This page further discusses possible side effects and dosing tips for Actifed.
  • Actifed Old Formula
    The version of Actifed currently sold in the United States is different from the old Actifed formula. This eMedTV article explains why the old formula is no longer available in brand-name form; however, generic versions are still available.
  • Actifed Original Formula
    As this eMedTV page explains, the version of Actifed currently sold in stores today is different from the original Actifed formula. Although the original formula is no longer available in brand-name form, generic versions of Actifed are still available.
  • Actifed Side Effects
    A few common side effects of Actifed include headaches, nervousness, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web resource offers an in-depth look at other possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that require prompt medical care.
  • Actifed Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, Actifed tablets are a non-prescription medicine used to treat symptoms of allergies or the common cold. This page offers a brief overview of Actifed, including how it works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Actinel
    Available by prescription, Actonel is a drug that is licensed to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Actinel is a common misspelling of Actonel.
  • Actinol
    Actonel is a prescription medicine licensed to prevent and treat osteoporosis. This eMedTV Web page describes Actonel in more detail and explores various uses of this medication. Actinol is a common misspelling of Actonel.
  • Action of Cipro
    As this eMedTV page explains, the specific actions of Cipro include interfering with bacteria's ability to grow and multiply. This article takes a brief look at how Cipro works to treat bacterial infections and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Action of Digoxin
    By blocking a certain enzyme in the body, digoxin can help treat heart failure or atrial fibrillation. This eMedTV Web selection further discusses the actions of this medication, explaining how digoxin works to make the heart more efficient.
  • Action of Irinotecan
    By blocking the action of certain enzymes, irinotecan can help treat colon or rectal cancer. This eMedTV article describes how this chemotherapy drug works to prevent cancer cells from dividing. A link to more details is also included.
  • Action of Univasc
    This eMedTV selection explains how Univasc works by describing the drug's actions within the body. This article also offers some basic dosing guidelines and provides a link to more detailed information on the medication.
  • Actiq
    Actiq is a type of lozenge that is prescribed to treat breakthrough cancer pain. This page from the eMedTV Web library provides an in-depth look at this narcotic pain medication, including how it works, when to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Actiq Lollipop
    Available in the form of a lozenge with a handle ("lollipop"), Actiq treats breakthrough cancer pain. This eMedTV Web article offers a brief overview of this pain medication, including how to use it effectively. A link to more details is also included.
  • Actiq Manufacturer
    Cephalon, Inc., is the company that makes brand-name Actiq. This eMedTV Web article also offers a listing of manufacturers who make generic versions of Actiq, and includes links to more in-depth information.
  • Actiq Medication
    As a prescription pain medication, Actiq is approved for treating breakthrough cancer pain. This page of the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at Actiq, including information on what it is used for and how it may not be suitable for everyone.
  • Actiq Usage
    Actiq is a lozenge used for treating breakthrough cancer pain. This eMedTV article discusses Actiq usage in more detail, including how to use this medication in the safest manner possible. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Active Ingredient in Cipro
    Ciprofloxacin is the active ingredient in Cipro -- it works by interfering with bacteria's ability to grow. This eMedTV page explores this antibiotic, including how it works and why it can't treat viral infections. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Active Ingredient in MiraLAX
    As this eMedTV article explains, polyethylene glycol 3350 (PEG-3350) is the active ingredient in MiraLAX. In fact, PEG-3350 is the only ingredient in MiraLAX, because this laxative does not contain any inactive ingredients.
  • Active Tuberculosis
    Active tuberculosis is the more serious form of tuberculosis. As this eMedTV page explains, it affects 8 million people worldwide each year. Active tuberculosis occurs when the immune system is unable to stop the tuberculosis bacteria from growing.
  • Activella
    Activella is a hormone replacement therapy medication available by prescription. This eMedTV article explains what the drug is used for, offers dosing information, and lists potential side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Actonal
    Actonel is a prescription drug used to treat and prevent osteoporosis. This eMedTV article lists other approved uses for Actonel, describes how the medicine works, and explains how often it is taken. Actonal is a common misspelling of Actonel.
  • Actonel
    Actonel is a prescription drug that is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. As this eMedTV page explains, it can also treat corticosteroid-related osteoporosis in men and women. Information on dosing and side effects is also provided.
  • Actonel and Depression
    Is there a link between Actonel and depression? As this eMedTV article explains, depression occurred in up to 6.8 percent of people taking the drug in clinical studies. This article explains why it is still unclear if depression is actually a side effect.
  • Actonel and Hair Loss
    As this eMedTV segment explains, hair loss does not appear to be a side effect of Actonel. This article takes a closer look at this topic, providing information on clinical studies and explaining what to do if hair loss occurs while taking the drug.
  • Actonel Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, your Actonel dosage will be based on factors such as the condition being treated and whether you prefer to take the drug daily, weekly, or monthly. Helpful tips are also provided for those taking the drug.
  • Actonel for Osteoporosis
    This selection of the eMedTV archives takes a look at using Actonel for osteoporosis. This page briefly explains how this medication works, other conditions it can treat, and when it is typically prescribed. A link to more information is also included.
  • Actonel Side Effects
    Back pain, bladder infection, and joint pain are among the most common Actonel side effects. This eMedTV resource offers a detailed list of both common and rare side effects, as well as side effects with Actonel that may require immediate attention.
  • Actonil
    Actonel is a drug that is approved to treat osteoporosis and Paget's disease. This eMedTV segment provides a general overview of the drug and also includes a link to more detailed information. Actonil is a common misspelling of Actonel.
  • Actoplus Met
    Actoplus Met is a combination medicine that is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This eMedTV article describes the drug in detail and explains how it works, lists some possible side effects, and offers general dosing information.
  • Actoplus Met 15 Mg/500 Mg
    Most people looking to control type 2 diabetes with Actoplus Met start with 15 mg/500 mg or 15 mg/850 mg. This eMedTV article discusses factors that can affect a person's recommended dose and how often they should take it, with a link to more information.
  • Actoplus Met XR
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed look at Actoplus Met XR, a combination diabetes drug with two different active ingredients that work together to control blood sugar. This page explains how it works and discusses side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Actos
    Actos is a prescription medicine that is licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains how Actos works and further explores the effects and potential side effects of this diabetes medication.
  • Actos (Pioglitazone) Diabetes Medicine
    This eMedTV article provides a brief description of the diabetes medicine Actos (pioglitazone). This article explains how Actos works to help improve insulin sensitivity and decrease blood sugar levels, and also discusses the effectiveness of this drug.
  • Actos 15 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, a dose of 15 mg of Actos tablets once daily may be prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This article further discusses Actos dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to take this medication.
  • Actos 30 mg
    This eMedTV article explains that if you have type 2 diabetes, a doctor may prescribe 30 mg of Actos once daily. This page also offers some tips on taking this medication and describes some of the factors that may affect your dosage.
  • Actos 45 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, 45 mg is the highest available strength of Actos tablets. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses Actos dosing guidelines, including tips on using this medication and a list of factors that may affect your dosage.
  • Actos and Diabetes Control
    As this eMedTV page discusses, clinical studies have shown that using Actos to control diabetes is an effective treatment option for some people. This article also explains how this medication works and what to tell your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Actos and Weight Gain
    Side effects may occur with Actos, and weight gain is a problem that is commonly reported. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how common weight gain is with Actos and discusses the dangers of rapid weight gain and fluid retention.
  • Actos Diabetic Drug Information
    This eMedTV page offers important information on the diabetes drug Actos. This medicine can be used by itself or with other drugs to treat type 2 diabetes. This page also explains who may not be able to use this medicine and lists possible side effects.
  • Actos Drug Info
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers important information on Actos, a prescription drug used for treating type 2 diabetes. This Web page also explains why Actos may not be suitable for some people and lists possible side effects.
  • Actos for Diabetes
    Actos is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes because it can help control blood sugar levels. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, lists an off-label use for it, and discusses the use of Actos for diabetes treatment in children.
  • Actos Oral
    There is only one form of Actos -- oral tablets. This eMedTV Web page explains what Actos is used for, lists available strengths, and describes potential side effects of this medicine. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Actos Pills
    Available in the form of a pill, Actos is an oral medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page offers more detail on how this drug works, available strengths, and some general safety concerns to review with your healthcare provider.
  • Actos Plus Met
    Actoplus Met is available by prescription for type 2 diabetes treatment. This eMedTV resource explores aspects of the medication, including how it works, its effects, and possible side effects. Actos Plus Met is a common misspelling of Actoplus Met.
  • Actose
    Actos is a diabetes medicine specifically licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how Actos works, describes the effects of the drug, and lists potential side effects to look out for. Actose is a common misspelling of Actos.
  • Acufen
    Ocufen is a prescription medicine used to keep the pupil from becoming too small during eye surgery. This eMedTV Web selection explains how Ocufen works and lists some of its potential side effects. Acufen is a common misspelling of Ocufen.
  • Acupril
    Accupril is a prescription drug used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure symptoms. This eMedTV segment examines dosing, strengths, side effects, and storage methods for this medicine. Acupril is a common misspelling of Accupril.
  • Acupuncture and Depression
    Acupuncture may be useful as a complementary treatment for depression. This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of acupuncture and depression, noting in particular that acupuncture shouldn't be used in place of conventional treatment options.
  • Acupuncture for Migraines
    Some people with migraines may experience as much benefit from acupuncture as from traditional drugs. This eMedTV page discusses the results of research studies on preventing migraines with acupuncture, including tips on finding a practitioner.
  • Acustic Neurinoma
    An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that comes from an overproduction of cells that support certain nerves of the inner ear. This eMedTV page describes the 2 types of acoustic neuroma. Acustic neurinoma is a common misspelling of acoustic neuroma.
  • Acustic Neuroma
    Acustic neuroma is a common misspelling of acoustic neuroma. An acoustic neuroma is a benign tumor that develops from certain nerves of the inner ear. The eMedTV library contains in-depth information about acoustic neuroma and related topics.
  • Acutaine
    This eMedTV page explains that Accutane is a prescription medication approved to treat severe nodular acne. This page also covers some general precautions and provides a link to more detailed information. Acutaine is a common misspelling of Accutane.
  • Acutane
    Accutane is a medicine prescribed for the treatment of severe nodular acne. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Accutane, including possible side effects, dosing tips, and general precautions. Acutane is a common misspelling of Accutane.
  • Acutane Side Effects
    Common side effects of Accutane include fatigue, nausea, and water retention. This eMedTV page describes other Accutane side effects, including those that require medical care. Acutane side effects is a common misspelling of Accutane side effects.
  • Acute Appendicitis
    Acute appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix) is considered a medical emergency. This eMedTV article covers topics such as the causes, symptoms, treatment, and complications associated with the condition.
  • Acute Glaucoma
    Although acute glaucoma occurs in less than 10 percent of glaucoma cases, it can cause rapid loss of vision. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at this serious condition and its causes, symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Acute Leukemia
    Acute leukemia is a cancer that starts in blood-forming tissue and progresses very quickly. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at this condition, including possible causes, symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia
    Acute lymphocytic leukemia accounts for about 3,800 new cases of leukemia each year. This section of the eMedTV archives describes this type of leukemia, which is the most common type of leukemia in young children but can also affect adults.
  • Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Death Statistics
    This eMedTV page offers statistics on acute lymphocytic leukemia, explaining how the highest number of deaths is in people under 20 years old. This article also explains who the disease is most likely to affect.
  • Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Statistics
    Acute lymphocytic leukemia statistics show the overall five-year relative survival rate was 64.6 percent. This eMedTV website includes more statistics about the incidence, lifetime risk, and death rates with acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute Pancreatitis
    Acute pancreatitis occurs suddenly, lasts for a short period of time, and usually gets better. This eMedTV article provides an in-depth look at acute pancreatitis by discussing the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition.
  • Acute Pancreatitis Complications
    Complications of acute pancreatitis can include lung problems, infections, and kidney failure. This part of the eMedTV library discusses in detail these and other problems that can occur with acute pancreatitis.
  • Acute Pancreatitis Symptoms
    Upper abdominal pain, vomiting, and a rapid pulse are some of the signs and symptoms of acute pancreatitis. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at the possible symptoms of this condition, including severe symptoms.
  • Acute Pancreatitis Treatment
    A hospital stay is usually required following an attack of acute pancreatitis. This segment of the eMedTV Web site explains in detail how treatment for acute pancreatitis is designed to support vital bodily functions and prevent complications.
  • Acute Pharyngitis
    A sore throat that lasts for a brief period of time is known medically as acute pharyngitis. This eMedTV Web resource provides more detailed information on this throat condition, including various causes and possible symptoms.
  • Acute Sinusitis
    Acute sinusitis refers to sinus inflammation that has been going on for fewer than four weeks. This eMedTV segment provides an overview of this type of sinus infection, with detailed information on symptoms, causes, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Acute Sinusitis Symptoms
    With acute sinusitis, symptoms can range from facial pain to headache to thick, yellow-green mucus. This eMedTV Web page discusses other possible signs and symptoms, including a discussion on when a sinus infection requires medical attention.
  • Acute Sinusitis Treatment
    If you have acute sinusitis, you may find relief with ibuprofen, nasal irrigation, and nasal sprays. This eMedTV resource describes several treatments for acute sinusitis, with details on why it's important not to take certain nasal sprays for too long.
  • Acyclivor
    Acyclovir is an antiviral medication licensed to treat shingles, chickenpox, and genital herpes. This eMedTV Web page explains how acyclovir works and offers general warnings for this drug. Acyclivor is a common misspelling of acyclovir.
  • Acyclover
    Acyclovir is a prescription medicine approved to treat genital herpes, chickenpox, and shingles. This eMedTV resource explores these acyclovir uses in more detail and explains how the drug works. Acyclover is a common misspelling of acyclovir.
  • Acyclovir
    Acyclovir is a prescription medicine that is used to treat shingles, chickenpox, and genital herpes. This eMedTV article offers an overview of the drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Acyclovir Cream
    Acyclovir cream is licensed to treat cold sores in adults and adolescents (age 12 or over). This eMedTV page offers an overview of the medicine, providing information on how the cream works, potential side effects, and tips for taking the medication.
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