Health Channels
Tools & Services
Use eMedTV's tools and services to receive up-to-date health information, tips, answers, and more.
Savings Card
Our free DiscountRx savings card can help you and your family save money on your prescriptions. This card is accepted at all major chain pharmacies, nationwide. Get Your Card Now.
HealthSavvy
Stay up-to-date on the health topics that interest you. Sign up now for our free HealthSavvy service.
DiscountRX
Looking to save on your prescriptions? eMedTV may be able to help. Sign up for our medication discount program.
Baby Builder
Browse our database of over 75,000 names to create baby names you can share with your family and friends.
BMI Calculator
Enter your height and weight to get your BMI and what it means for you and your health.

eMedTV Articles A-Z

Chickenpox Prevention - Cholesterol and Heart Attack

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Chickenpox Prevention to Cholesterol and Heart Attack. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Chickenpox Prevention
    Getting the varicella vaccine is the most effective method of preventing chickenpox. This eMedTV article offers a detailed explanation of this preventive measure and discusses who should and shouldn't get the vaccine.
  • Chickenpox Transmission
    The most common type of chickenpox transmission occurs through direct contact with an infected individual. This eMedTV segment takes a look at different chickenpox transmission methods, including through sneezing and coughing.
  • Chickenpox Twice
    Although rare, it is possible for someone to be infected with chickenpox twice. This section from the eMedTV site talks about this possibility. This page also explains how people who are immunocompromised are more likely to get chickenpox twice.
  • Chickenpox Vaccine
    The chickenpox (varicella) vaccine is the best way to prevent chickenpox. This eMedTV article provides an overview of the vaccine and its effectiveness. This page also provides information on the side effects and safety of the vaccine.
  • Chickenpox Vaccine and Pregnancy
    Women who are pregnant or attempting to become pregnant should avoid the chickenpox vaccine. This part of the eMedTV archives provides detailed information about the chickenpox vaccine and pregnancy.
  • Chickenpox Vaccine Information
    Wondering if there is a vaccine for chickenpox? As this eMedTV Web page explains, the answer is yes. This segment provides a brief overview of this vaccine, with a look at its effectiveness and a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Chickenpox Vaccine Side Effects
    Common side effects of the chickenpox vaccine can include soreness, fever, and a mild rash. This eMedTV page provides detailed information on other possible side effects of the vaccine, including problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Chickenpoxs
    Chickenpox is a highly contagious disease that results in a blister-like rash. This eMedTV article describes how the chickenpox virus is transmitted and explains when medical attention is needed. Chickenpoxs is a common misspelling of chickenpox.
  • Chikenpox
    Chickenpox is a disease characterized by blister-like rashes, itching, tiredness, and fever. This eMedTV page covers how chickenpox is transmitted and lists some of the serious symptoms of this condition. Chikenpox is a common misspelling of chickenpox.
  • Child Autism
    This portion of the eMedTV archives provides an overview of child autism, including statistics on its frequency. There is no cure for this condition, which is a brain disorder that affects the ability to think, communicate, and interact socially.
  • Child Leukemia
    As this eMedTV segment explains, an estimated 2,000 children a year are diagnosed with leukemia. This Web page describes the most common types, lists possible risk factors, and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Child Paxil
    Paxil is a prescription drug used to treat various conditions within the brain. As this eMedTV page explains, the medication should not be given to a child. Paxil studies have shown that the drug is not effective for treating depression in children.
  • Childbirth -- Presentation Introduction
    This video summary describes what you can expect during the birthing process.
  • Childbirth -- Presentation Summary
    This video offers some final thoughts regarding childbirth.
  • Childbirth Education
    As this eMedTV article explains, preparing for childbirth involves learning about the different stages of labor, among other things. This resource takes a closer look at childbirth education, with a link to learn more.
  • Childbirth Information
    Are you looking for information on childbirth? This page from the eMedTV site gives a brief overview of what happens during a typical vaginal birth. Also included is a link to more in-depth discussions on childbirth.
  • Childbirth Medications
    This multimedia clip describes several medications that may be used during childbirth.
  • Childbirth Pain Management
    This video describes epidurals and other anesthesia for use during childbirth.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Abnormal Presentation
    This video describes the various positions a baby may be in prior to delivery.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Allergic Reaction to Medication
    This video explains why allergic reactions to medicines occur and how likely they are.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Failure to Progress Through Labor
    This video clip explains what happens if there is a failure to progress through labor.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Infection of Mother or Child
    This video clip describes possible infections that can occur to the mother or child during birth.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Major
    Certain major complications can occur with childbirth, as this multimedia clip explains.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Stress to the Baby
    This interactive video explains what will happen if stress to the baby occurs during labor and delivery.
  • Childbirth Risks -- Tears
    This video discusses what it means to tear during childbirth.
  • Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia is a cancer of the white blood cells. This part of the eMedTV Web site covers this condition in detail, with information on symptoms, treatment options, prognosis, and more.
  • Childhood AML
    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can affect both children and adults. This eMedTV segment offers an overview of childhood AML, including information on symptoms, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment options.
  • Childhood Asthma
    Cases of childhood asthma have increased dramatically over recent years. This portion of the eMedTV library offers a detailed explanation of the effects this condition can have on children and lists treatment options that are currently available.
  • Childhood Depression
    Children who are depressed may suffer from low-self esteem and have a hard time getting along with others. This eMedTV Web page provides detailed information about childhood depression, including its types, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment.
  • Childhood Disintegrative Disorder
    Childhood disintegrative disorder is a rare type of autism spectrum disorder. As this eMedTV page explains, it is characterized by a profound loss of vocabulary, motor skills, and social skills. It usually occurs between the ages of three and four.
  • Childhood Dosing for MiraLAX
    Using MiraLAX to treat constipation in children is considered an "off-label" (or unapproved) use. This eMedTV Web article offers some general information on childhood dosing guidelines to follow for treating constipation.
  • Childhood Leukemia
    Childhood leukemia is a form of cancer in which blood-forming tissue produces abnormal blood cells. This eMedTV article describes the types of leukemia most common among children, including information about risk factors and symptoms.
  • Childhood Leukemia Symptoms
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, symptoms of childhood leukemia commonly include fatigue, fever, and frequent infections. This article provides a list of symptoms occurring with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML).
  • Childhood Obesity Statistics
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that obesity in children has increased by four times over the past 40 years. This article discusses statistics on childhood obesity, as well as current obesity trends.
  • Childhood Schizophrenia
    Although rare, childhood schizophrenia can be much more difficult to treat than in adults. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed overview of this condition, with information on causes, symptoms, treatment options, and the role genetics plays.
  • Children and Heart Murmurs
    When heart murmurs occur in children, they are usually harmless. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at this topic, explaining how abnormal murmurs in children may be treated with medications or surgery.
  • Children With Down Syndrome
    Down syndrome can result in certain medical or developmental issues in children. This eMedTV article describes these issues in detail and explores the value of early intervention for children with Down syndrome.
  • Children With Klinefelter Syndrome
    As this eMedTV page explains, children with Klinefelter syndrome are similar to other children, except they usually have difficulties in language acquisition and development. This page provides tips for parents of children with this condition.
  • Children With Osteogenesis Imperfecta
    Because children with osteogenesis imperfecta can easily be injured, this eMedTV article explains that it's important to take certain precautions when handling them. This page offers tips on bathing, clothing, and handling children with this disorder.
  • Children's Tylenol
    Children's Tylenol is a nonprescription drug approved for treating minor pain in children ages 2 to 11. This eMedTV page further explains what this medication is used for and offers information on dosing, warnings, and possible side effects.
  • Children's Tylenol Dosage
    Your child's age and weight are the main factors in determining his or her Children's Tylenol dosage. This eMedTV segment provides a dosing chart for this group of medications and explains when and how to give your child his or her dose.
  • Chingles
    Shingles, which is caused by reinfection with the chickenpox virus, is most common in people over age 50. This eMedTV page lists other risk factors for shingles and describes various treatment options. Chingles is a common misspelling of shingles.
  • Chingles Vaccine
    The shingles vaccine, which is given to people over age 50, is given as a single injection. This eMedTV page explains what you should discuss with your doctor before getting vaccinated. Chingles vaccine is a common misspelling of shingles vaccine.
  • Chiropractic
    This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at chiropractic care, which entails hands-on therapy called manipulation. Licensing requirements, the goals of treatment, and various statistics are also provided.
  • Chiropractic Back Pain
    This eMedTV article provides a look at chiropractic back pain treatment, including the theories behind it and its effectiveness, which is still under debate -- both inside and outside of the profession. Links to related information are also included.
  • Chlamedia
    Chlamydia is an STD that can lead to serious reproductive problems if left untreated. This eMedTV segment explains what causes chlamydia, lists symptoms of the infection, and covers treatment options. Chlamedia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlamidea
    Chlamydia is an STD that is caused by infection with a certain type of bacteria. This eMedTV article briefly covers some symptoms of the disease and discusses its treatment. Chlamidea is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlamidia
    Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease that often has no symptoms. This portion of the eMedTV library describes how the disease is transmitted and how it is typically treated. Chlamidia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlamidia Symptoms
    A burning sensation while urinating is a common chlamydia symptom. As this eMedTV article explains, however, most people with chlamydia have no symptoms. Chlamidia symptoms is a common misspelling and variation of symptoms of chlamydia.
  • Chlamidie
    Chlamydia is the most commonly reported bacterial sexually transmitted disease in the United States. This eMedTV Web page lists possible symptoms of chlamydia and describes associated complications. Chlamidie is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlamidya Symptoms
    Common chlamydia symptoms may include painful urination and abnormal discharge from the penis or vagina. This eMedTV segment explains what may happen if the infection is left untreated. Chlamidya symptoms is a common misspelling of chlamydia symptoms.
  • Chlamydia
    Chlamydia is an STD that is often unknowingly passed to others through sexual contact. As this eMedTV Web article explains, there are usually no symptoms. However, the disease is often fully curable if diagnosed and treated early.
  • Chlamydia Complications
    Chlamydia complications that occur as a result of an untreated infection can ultimately lead to infertility. This eMedTV page explains how chlamydia complications are associated with other serious risks, such as increased chances of developing HIV.
  • Chlamydia in Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, chlamydia can lead to complications if you are pregnant. This article further discusses pregnancy and chlamydia, including information on potential dangers for the mother and the child.
  • Chlamydia Info
    Are you looking for info on chlamydia? Check out this segment of the eMedTV archives. It describes the cause of this disease, lists common symptoms, and stresses the importance of prompt diagnosis and treatment, with a link to learn more.
  • Chlamydia Information
    This article from the eMedTV library presents some basic information on chlamydia, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. This page discusses possible symptoms, how it is treated, and why it often goes unreported.
  • Chlamydia Signs and Symptoms
    Typical chlamydia signs and symptoms include discharge from the penis or vagina, and pain during urination. This eMedTV article offers a list of chlamydia signs and symptoms in both men and women.
  • Chlamydia Symptoms
    If chlamydia symptoms appear at all, they are often mild and occur within 1 to 3 weeks after being infected. This eMedTV Web page contains a list of other symptoms and explains what happens when chlamydia is left untreated.
  • Chlamydia Testing
    As this eMedTV segment explains, testing for chlamydia should be conducted at least annually to lower risks of getting or transmitting the STD. This article takes a look at testing for this disease and describes the dangers of untreated infections.
  • Chlamydia Transmission
    As this eMedTV page explains, you can transmit chlamydia through oral, vaginal, or anal sex. This eMedTV article talks in more detail about how this STD is transmitted and discusses who is at higher risk of developing it.
  • Chlamydia Treatment
    Prompt chlamydia treatment can cure the infection and lower risks of developing serious complications. As this eMedTV article explains, the most effective treatment is antibiotics, such as azithromycin or doxycycline, which should be taken until gone.
  • Chlamydie
    Chlamydia is a bacterial infection that is transmitted during vaginal, anal, and oral sex. This eMedTV page further explores the causes, transmission, and treatment of this sexually transmitted disease. Chlamydie is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlamydien
    More than two million Americans are infected with the sexually transmitted disease chlamydia each year. This eMedTV Web page lists symptoms of chlamydia and explains how the infection is spread. Chlamydien is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlaymidia
    Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted bacterial infection that typically causes no symptoms. This part of the eMedTV library lists potential symptoms of chlamydia and explains what causes the infection. Chlaymidia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlesterol
    Cholesterol is used by your body to hold cells together and to make hormones and other substances. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of cholesterol and provides a link to more information. Chlesterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Chlestrol
    This eMedTV segment takes a look at cholesterol, which is a waxy substance found in all your body's cells. This article explains how cholesterol is tested and also offers a link to more information. Chlestrol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Chlmydia
    Chlamydia, a common sexually transmitted disease, often causes no symptoms. This eMedTV segment explores various problems associated with chlamydia and explains what treatment options are available. Chlmydia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chloesterol
    Your body needs cholesterol in order to work properly. However, as this eMedTV page explains, too much cholesterol in the body can cause problems. This article offers an introduction to cholesterol. Chloesterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Chlonadine
    People with high blood pressure may benefit from the prescription drug clonidine. This eMedTV segment explores other approved uses for the medicine and lists some possible side effects. Chlonadine is a common misspelling of clonidine.
  • Chlora
    Cholera is an acute illness caused by an infection with the Vibrio cholerae bacterium. This eMedTV resource explains how cholera is transmitted and explains what treatment options are available. Chlora is a common misspelling of cholera.
  • Chlorambucil
    Chlorambucil can help reduce symptoms in people with lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV Web page features an overview of this prescription medication, including how it works, dosing tips, safety precautions, and links to more details.
  • Chlorambucil 2 Mg
    Available in the form of a tablet, chlorambucil comes in one strength (2 mg) and is taken once daily. This eMedTV resource discusses the factors that affect your dosage and offers some tips on taking this drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Chlorambucil Dosage
    This eMedTV article contains details on how your healthcare provider will determine the appropriate chlorambucil dosage for you. This page also explains what to expect during this chemotherapy treatment, with some tips on how to properly take this drug.
  • Chlorambucil Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who take chlorambucil may develop low levels of blood cells, mouth sores, fever, and other side effects. This page also warns of potentially serious side effects, which need to be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • Chlorambucil Tablets
    A doctor may prescribe chlorambucil tablets to treat lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This eMedTV segment describes some general dosing guidelines for this prescription drug. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Chlordiazepox
    Chlordiazepoxide is a drug often used to treat symptoms of alcohol withdrawal and anxiety. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Chlordiazepox is a common misspelling of chlordiazepoxide.
  • Chlordiazepoxide
    Chlordiazepoxide is a prescribed medication that is licensed to treat anxiety and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV article offers a detailed overview of this medication, explaining how it works, possible side effects, tips on taking it safely, and more.
  • Chlordiazepoxide Hydrochloride Information
    This segment of the eMedTV library provides a brief overview of chlordiazepoxide hydrochloride, with information on what this drug is used for, how it works, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before beginning treatment.
  • Chlorodiazepoxide
    Chlordiazepoxide is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat anxiety and alcohol withdrawal. This eMedTV page briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more information. Chlorodiazepoxide is a common misspelling of chlordiazepoxide.
  • Chloropheniramine
    Chlorpheniramine is a medicine licensed to treat allergies, hives, and the common cold. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works and lists possible side effects to be aware of. Chloropheniramine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chloroquin
    Chloroquine is a drug commonly prescribed for malaria and extraintestinal amebiasis. This part of the eMedTV library gives a brief description of this medication and includes a link to more details. Chloroquin is a common misspelling of chloroquine.
  • Chloroquin Phosphate
    If you are trying to prevent malaria, your doctor may recommend a medication called chloroquine phosphate. This eMedTV segment briefly describes this drug and how it is taken. Chloroquin phosphate is a common misspelling of chloroquine phosphate.
  • Chloroquine
    Available by prescription, chloroquine is an antimalarial drug that can also be used to treat amebiasis. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at this medication, including safety precautions, dosing guidelines, and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Chloroquine Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, your dosage of chloroquine will depend on factors such as whether you are taking it to treat or to prevent malaria. This page further discusses dosing guidelines and lists several important tips for taking this drug.
  • Chloroquine Side Affects
    Common side effects of chloroquine include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This portion of the eMedTV site gives an introduction to possible adverse reactions to this drug. Chloroquine side affects is a common misspelling of chloroquine side effects.
  • Chloroquine Treatment for Malaria
    If you have malaria, your treatment may involve a drug called chloroquine. This article from the eMedTV Web site gives a brief description of treating malaria with this medication, including a link to more details on the topic.
  • Chlorothiazide
    Chlorothiazide is a prescription drug that is used to treat water retention and control high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains how the medication works, offers dosing information, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Chlorphen
    Chlorpheniramine is a medication approved to treat the common cold, allergies, and hives. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how the medication works and describes its effects. Chlorphen is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorphenamine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine found in many allergy and cold medications. This eMedTV page describes how the drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before taking it. Chlorphenamine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorpheneramine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine often used to treat allergies, hives, and the common cold. This eMedTV article describes how the drug works and offers general warnings for the product. Chlorpheneramine is a common misspelling of chlorpheniramine.
  • Chlorpheniramine
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine drug approved to treat the common cold, allergies, and hives. This eMedTV resource explains how the medication works, offers general dosing information, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Chlorpheniramine 4 mg Tablets
    A typical dosage for immediate-release chlorpheniramine 4 mg tablets is one tablet every four to six hours. This eMedTV resource also provides dosing guidelines for extended-release chlorpheniramine products and explains how dosing works for children.
  • Chlorpheniramine 8 mg
    Two strengths are available for extended-release chlorpheniramine: 8 mg and 12 mg capsules or tablets. This eMedTV Web page contains chlorpheniramine dosing guidelines for children and adults for both immediate-release and extended-release products.
  • Chlorpheniramine for Allergies
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine drug found in many prescription and over-the-counter products. As this eMedTV page explains, many people use chlorpheniramine for allergies, but the drug is also approved for treating the common cold and hives.
  • Chlorpheniramine for the Common Cold
    Chlorpheniramine is an antihistamine used in numerous prescription and non-prescription medications. As this eMedTV article explains, the drug is approved for several uses; you may use chlorpheniramine for the common cold, allergies, or hives.
  • Chlorpheniramine Liquid
    There are currently three different forms of chlorpheniramine: liquid, tablets, and capsules. This page from the eMedTV archives offers information on what chlorpheniramine is used for and describes the specific effects of this medication.
  • Chlorpheniramine Maleate
    Chlorpheniramine maleate is an antihistamine used in many prescription and over-the-counter drugs. This eMedTV segment discusses specific uses, explains how the medicine works, lists possible side effects to be aware of, and more.
  • Chlorpheniramine Maleate Dosage
    Depending on the particular form of chlorpheniramine maleate, dosing guidelines will vary. This part of the eMedTV library explains what a typical dosage is for adults taking either immediate-release or extended-release chlorpheniramine products.
  • Chlorpheniramine Overdose
    An overdose of chlorpheniramine may cause drowsiness, flushing, and rapid breathing. This eMedTV Web page lists other possible symptoms of an overdose and describes the steps that a healthcare provider may take to treat these symptoms.
  • Chlorpheniramine Side Effects
    Common side effects of chlorpheniramine include nausea, headaches, and diarrhea. This article on the eMedTV Web site also lists some of the less common but potentially serious side effects of this medication that require medical attention.
  • Chlorpheniramine Tablets
    There are several basic forms of chlorpheniramine: tablets, capsules, and liquid. This article from the eMedTV site describes chlorpheniramine in more detail, explaining how the medication works and its various effects, with links to more information.
  • Chlorpromazine
    Chlorpromazine is a drug used to treat nausea or vomiting, schizophrenia, tetanus, and other conditions. This eMedTV article lists other uses for the prescription drug, explains how it works, and offers some general dosing information.
  • Chlorpromazine Hydrochloride
    This page of the eMedTV library presents a brief look at chlorpromazine hydrochloride, a drug that is used to treat a wide variety of conditions. This segment lists the different uses, provides some basic dosing guidelines, and addresses side effects.
  • Chlorquin
    This eMedTV page gives a basic overview of chloroquine, a prescription malaria drug. This article discusses possible side effects and includes a link to more detailed information. Chlorquin is a common misspelling of chloroquine.
  • Chlorquine
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, chloroquine is used to treat malaria and extraintestinal amebiasis -- it can also be used to prevent malaria. This article gives a brief overview of this drug. Chlorquine is a common misspelling of chloroquine.
  • Chlorthalidone
    Chlorthalidone is a diuretic that can be used to treat fluid retention and high blood pressure. This eMedTV page takes a detailed look at the prescription drug, noting in particular how it works, how and when to take it, and its possible side effects.
  • Chlorthalidone Side Effects
    A few chlorthalidone side effects include dizziness, vomiting, and constipation. This eMedTV resource describes other side effects seen with the drug, including a list of those that should be reported right away to your healthcare provider.
  • Chlosteral
    Cholesterol, a waxy substance, is found in all of the cells in your body. This eMedTV Web page discusses the importance of cholesterol and explains how often your cholesterol should be checked. Chlosterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Chlymadia
    Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease that often causes no symptoms. This eMedTV resource describes how chlamydia is spread and explains how the infection is treated. Chlymadia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlymedia
    Chlamydia is commonly known as a "silent" disease because it often causes no symptoms. This eMedTV article explains how chlamydia is transmitted and what treatment options are available. Chlymedia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlymidia
    Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted diseases caused by a bacterial infection. This eMedTV resource discusses the cause of chlamydia and explains what symptoms may occur. Chlymidia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Chlymydia Symptoms
    Potential chlamydia symptoms include abnormal discharge and painful urination. As this eMedTV page explains, early symptoms usually appear within one to three weeks of infection. Chlymydia symptoms is a common misspelling of chlamydia symptoms.
  • Choesterol Diet
    While the body needs cholesterol to function properly, too much can cause problems. This eMedTV article explains the benefits of a low cholesterol diet. Choesterol diet is a common misspelling and variation of low cholesterol diet.
  • Cholera
    Cholera, an acute illness characterized by diarrhea, is caused by an infection in the intestines. This eMedTV resource provides an overview of the causes, transmission, and prevention of this illness, and also links to other resources on this topic.
  • Cholera -- The Disease
    As this eMedTV resource explains, cholera is a bacterial disease that can lead to diarrhea and vomiting. This segment presents a brief overview of this condition, with information on how it is transmitted, the usual treatment, and mortality rates.
  • Cholera Bacteria
    A certain type of bacteria is responsible for causing most cases of cholera. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives a brief description of Vibrio cholerae and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Cholera Causes
    As this eMedTV page explains, cholera is caused by two types of bacteria. This article takes an in-depth look at how these bacteria are usually transmitted through contaminated feces or by eating undercooked shellfish.
  • Cholera Cure
    With early treatment, a cholera cure is possible in more than 99 percent of patients. As this eMedTV Web page explains, fluids (and possibly antibiotics) are the key to treating this disease. This page also talks about how you can prevent cholera.
  • Cholera Diagnosis
    As this eMedTV article explains, diagnosing cholera involves taking the patient's medical history, performing a physical exam, and taking a stool sample. This Web page takes a closer look at how the condition is diagnosed.
  • Cholera Epidemic
    Poverty, poor sanitation, and large populations can lead to an epidemic of cholera. This eMedTV page discusses where epidemics are taking place, why they are difficult to overcome, and what needs to be improved before they can be stopped.
  • Cholera Facts
    Anyone who travels worldwide should know some basic facts about cholera (an acute diarrheal illness). This eMedTV segment presents cholera facts, including information about the cause, transmission, treatment, and prevention of cholera.
  • Cholera Information
    Are you looking for information on cholera? This eMedTV Web page is a great place to start. It explains how the disease is transmitted, possible symptoms, and treatment, with a link to an in-depth article on this topic.
  • Cholera Signs and Symptoms
    As this section of the eMedTV site explains, signs and symptoms of cholera can include vomiting, diarrhea, and increased heart rate. This article talks about these and other symptoms, with details on the potential complications of cholera.
  • Cholera Symptoms
    Possible symptoms of cholera include watery diarrhea, vomiting, and muscle cramps. This eMedTV segment describes the signs and symptoms of this illness, as well as symptoms that can occur as a result of fluid loss, such as severe dehydration.
  • Cholera Transmission
    The most common form of cholera transmission is eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water. This eMedTV Web page explains how food becomes contaminated and how it is unlikely for transmission to occur through casual contact.
  • Cholera Treatment
    In general, cholera treatment involves fluid replacement and, in some cases, antibiotics. This eMedTV Web page explains how these methods work. When administered promptly, they can lower the mortality rate of cholera to less than 1 percent.
  • Cholera Vaccine
    As this eMedTV article explains, there is no vaccine for cholera available in the United States, but there are two vaccines that are used in other countries. This page explains why the vaccine is generally not recommended for travelers.
  • Cholera Virus
    Cholera in humans is caused by bacteria, not a virus. However, a virus can cause cholera in pigs. This eMedTV Web page discusses the cholera virus in pigs and explains how the bacterium can get into food or water and infect humans.
  • Cholero
    Cholera, an acute diarrheal illness, is not a major threat in the United States. This eMedTV article explains how cholera is spread and describes various treatment options that are currently available. Cholero is a common misspelling of cholera.
  • Cholessterol
    Cholesterol is a type of substance that is necessary for the human body to function properly. This eMedTV page describes the various types of cholesterol and explains how your body uses them. Cholessterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestarol
    The body uses cholesterol to hold cells together and to make certain substances in the body. This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at cholesterol, and provides a link to more detailed information. Cholestarol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholesteral
    Cholesterol is a common substance found throughout the body that helps it to function properly. This eMedTV page describes the test healthcare providers use to measure cholesterol in the blood. Cholesteral is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholesteral Diet
    As this eMedTV article explains, a low cholesterol diet involves eating more of certain foods (such as vegetables) and eating less of others (such as saturated fats). Cholesteral diet is a common misspelling and variation of low cholesterol diet.
  • Cholesteral Drugs
    There are five major types of cholesterol drugs. This eMedTV article lists these types of cholesterol drugs (such as statins) and provides a link to more information. Cholesteral drugs is a common misspelling of cholesterol drugs.
  • Cholesteral Levels
    A healthy cholesterol level is one that is under 200 mg/dL. This eMedTV page explains the types of cholesterol levels (such as LDL or HDL cholesterol) and how to interpret them. Cholesteral levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Cholesteral Medications
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are five types of cholesterol medications, and they can be combined to enhance the effects and decrease the risks of high cholesterol. Cholesteral medications is a common misspelling of cholesterol medications.
  • Cholesteral Numbers
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, cholesterol numbers are used to determine the cholesterol levels in your bloodstream -- for example, numbers over 240 mg/dL are considered high. Cholesteral numbers is a common variation of cholesterol numbers.
  • Cholesteral Ratio
    When a person has a cholesterol blood test, the results may show a cholesterol ratio (or several ratios). This eMedTV page offers an overview of the various types of cholesterol ratios. Cholesteral ratio is a common misspelling of cholesterol ratio.
  • Cholesterol
    Cholesterol, found in every cell in your body, is needed to hold cells together, among other things. This eMedTV article explains the types of cholesterol and how too much in your blood can increase your risk of developing heart disease.
  • Cholesterol and Heart Attack
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, one of the risk factors for heart attacks is high cholesterol. This article discusses this topic in detail and explains how high cholesterol can increase your risk.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2016 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.