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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Celiac Disease Screening - Chickenpox Pictures

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Celiac Disease Screening to Chickenpox Pictures. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Celiac Disease Screening
    As explained on this eMedTV Web page, celiac disease screening involves using blood tests to check for the presence of antibodies in people who show no symptoms of the disease. Relatives of people with celiac disease may wish to undergo screening.
  • CellCept and Breastfeeding
    It is generally not recommended for women to take CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV article discusses whether the drug passes through human breast milk and describes some of the possible problems that may occur.
  • CellCept Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, dosing guidelines for CellCept will vary, based on your weight, age, and various other factors. This article describes other factors that may affect your dose and offers tips on taking this medicine.
  • CellCept Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page outlines some of the many different drug interactions that may occur with CellCept, including those that may lead to serious complications. Some of the products described in this article are antibiotics, oral contraceptives, and antacids.
  • CellCept Medication Information
    CellCept is a drug approved to prevent organ rejection after a liver, kidney, or heart transplant. This eMedTV article provides more information on CellCept, including how this prescription medication works, possible side effects, and safety issues.
  • CellCept Mycophenolate
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV library, mycophenolate is the active ingredient in CellCept, a drug used to prevent organ rejection in people who have had a kidney, heart, or liver transplant. This page also links to more detailed information.
  • CellCept Overdose
    This eMedTV resource explains that if you take too much CellCept, it can cause problems like vomiting and diarrhea. This page describes other possible overdose symptoms that may occur and discusses how your doctor may treat these reactions.
  • CellCept Uses
    If you have had a kidney, heart, or liver transplant, using CellCept can prevent organ rejection. This eMedTV Web selection examines what this medicine is used for, with detailed information on how it works and whether it is safe for use in children.
  • CellCept Warnings and Precautions
    CellCept may not be appropriate for some people, including those with a history of diabetes or cancer. This eMedTV article describes several warnings and safety precautions for CellCept, with details on potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • Cellulitis Diagnosis
    A cellulitis diagnosis may be made by examining the affected area. As this eMedTV resource explains, skin affected by cellulitis will be red, warm to the touch, swollen, and painful. This article explains the steps involved in diagnosing cellulitis.
  • Cellulitis Risk Factors
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, cellulitis risk factors include breaks in the skin, vein problems, swelling of the leg, and obesity. This article provides specific examples of risk factors for cellulitis, such as skin ulcers and eczema.
  • Cenestin Alternatives
    This eMedTV article explains that other conventional medications, coping strategies, and natural remedies are some of the alternatives to Cenestin. This page further describes Cenestin alternatives and explains when to consider these options.
  • Cenestin and Breastfeeding
    The hormones in Cenestin do pass through breast milk. This eMedTV segment explains that it is not typically recommended for women to take Cenestin and breastfeed at the same time, as this drug can affect the quality and quantity of breast milk.
  • Cenestin and Pregnancy
    Pregnant women should not use Cenestin. This eMedTV page further discusses Cenestin and pregnancy, explaining why there is no legitimate medical reason for pregnant women to use Cenestin, as it is only approved for postmenopausal women.
  • Cenestin Dosage
    For treating hot flashes or night sweats, the recommended starting Cenestin dose is 0.45 mg once daily. This eMedTV Web page also discusses Cenestin dosing guidelines for treating vaginal problems and provides tips for when and how to take the drug.
  • Cenestin Drug Information
    Are you looking for information on Cenestin? This eMedTV page contains basic information on this estrogen drug, including some of the menopause symptoms it is used to treat and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting it.
  • Cenestin Drug Interactions
    Thyroid medications, antibiotics, and grapefruit juice may cause negative interactions with Cenestin. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may cause Cenestin drug interactions and describes the complications that may occur.
  • Cenestin Overdose
    You should seek immediate medical attention if you believe you have taken too much Cenestin. This eMedTV Web article explains how a Cenestin overdose may cause nausea, vomiting, and other problems. This page also describes possible treatment options.
  • Cenestin Side Effects
    Breast pain, stomach pain, and infections are among the most common side effects reported with Cenestin. This eMedTV page lists other Cenestin side effects, including those that are serious and may require immediate medical care (such as chest pain).
  • Cenestin Uses
    Cenestin is used for treating certain menopause symptoms, such as hot flashes and vaginal dryness. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at these and other Cenestin uses, including possible off-label uses (such as preventing osteoporosis).
  • Cenestin Warnings and Precautions
    If you have a history of certain types of cancer, you may not be able to take Cenestin. This eMedTV page lists other important Cenestin warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before taking this drug.
  • Centrum Cardio and Breastfeeding
    It is not known if Centrum Cardio is safe for women who are breastfeeding. Centrum Cardio, as this eMedTV page explains, may affect certain hormones, which may cause problems. A prenatal vitamin may be a better choice for women who are breastfeeding.
  • Centrum Cardio and Pregnancy
    It is generally recommended that pregnant women avoid taking Centrum Cardio. This eMedTV segment contains more information on Centrum Cardio and pregnancy, and describes the problems that may occur if pregnant women use this multivitamin.
  • Centrum Cardio Dosage
    The standard Centrum Cardio dosage is one tablet taken twice daily with food. This selection from the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at Centrum Cardio dosing guidelines, and offers some tips on when and how to take this supplement.
  • Centrum Cardio Drug Interactions
    Certain antibiotics, thyroid medications, and bisphosphonates may interact with Centrum Cardio. This eMedTV article explains that these Centrum Cardio drug interactions may decrease the absorption of these medications into the body.
  • Centrum Cardio Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that although a Centrum Cardio overdose is not likely to cause life-threatening problems in most cases, it can cause iron poisoning (which can be extremely dangerous). This page also covers possible treatment options.
  • Centrum Cardio Safety
    Centrum Cardio can mask certain types of anemia and may interact with some medications. This eMedTV Web page describes other Centrum Cardio safety warnings and precautions, and explains who should avoid taking Centrum Cardio vitamins.
  • Centrum Cardio Side Effects
    Although most people do not have any problems taking Centrum Cardio, side effects are possible. This eMedTV page lists some of the potential side effects of Centrum Cardio (such as nausea and gas) and explains which side effects require medical care.
  • Cephalexin and Pregnancy
    This page of the eMedTV library explains that cephalexin is a pregnancy Category B medicine, meaning that it may be given to pregnant women if the benefits outweigh the risks. Other aspects of cephalexin and pregnancy are also discussed.
  • Cephalexin Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, cephalexin dosing for bacterial infections ranges from 250 mg to 1000 mg, taken four times a day. This page also explains the dosage for other conditions and factors that can affect the exact dose prescribed.
  • Cephalexin Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV segment describes various cephalexin drug interactions. Cephalexin can interact with drugs like amikacin, neomycin, and metformin to raise the amount of medicine in your body and make certain vaccines less effective, among other things.
  • Cephalexin Oral
    An oral medication, cephalexin is used for treating various types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web page covers other approved cephalexin uses, offers general dosing information for this drug, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Cephalexin Precautions and Warnings
    This page of the eMedTV archives covers cephalexin precautions and warnings, like what to tell your doctor before treatment, side effects, and who should not take the drug. It also lists precautions for people who are nursing or have kidney disease.
  • Cephapime
    Cefepime is a medication commonly prescribed to treat bacterial infections. This eMedTV page describes how this product works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Cephapime is a common misspelling of cefepime.
  • Cephatetan
    Available by prescription only, cefotetan is an antibiotic used to treat various bacterial infections. This eMedTV page describes how this drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor. Cephatetan is a common misspelling of cefotetan.
  • Cephazolin Sodium
    Cefazolin is a prescription antibiotic used to treat or prevent certain types of infections. This eMedTV article discusses how this drug works and lists potential side effects. Cephazolin sodium is a common misspelling of cefazolin sodium.
  • Cephelaxin
    Cephalexin is a prescription drug used to treat sinus infections and other types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV page describes how it works and explains how often this medicine is taken. Cephelaxin is a common misspelling of cephalexin.
  • Cephepime
    Cefepime is a prescription drug used to treat certain types of infections. This eMedTV segment describes how this drug works and outlines some potential side effects of the antibiotic. Cephepime is a common misspelling of cefepime.
  • Cephepime Antibiotic
    Cefepime is an antibiotic that can be prescribed to treat various infections. This eMedTV page lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before he or she gives you the drug. Cephepime antibiotic is a common misspelling of cefepime antibiotic.
  • Cephlaxin
    Cephalexin is a prescription antibiotic used for treating various types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV resource describes the drug in more detail and covers specific uses for this medicine. Cephlaxin is a common misspelling of cephalexin.
  • Cephotaxime
    Cefotaxime is a prescription antibiotic used to treat certain types of infections. This eMedTV resource discusses how this drug works and outlines some of the potential side effects. Cephotaxime is a common misspelling of cefotaxime.
  • Cephsil
    Cefzil, a prescription antibiotic, is used for treating certain types of infections. This eMedTV Web selection offers information on general dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more. Cephsil is a common misspelling of Cefzil.
  • Cephzil
    Cefzil is a prescription antibiotic licensed to treat various bacterial infections. This article from the eMedTV Web library describes how this drug works and explains what to discuss with your doctor. Cephzil is a common misspelling of Cefzil.
  • Ceptic Arthritis
    When a bacterial infection occurs within a joint, septic arthritis can develop. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of septic arthritis and lists risk factors for this condition. Ceptic arthritis is a common misspelling of septic arthritis.
  • Cerafim
    Sarafem, a prescription medicine, is used for treating premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). This eMedTV article describes Sarafem in more detail and explains how it works to relieve symptoms of PMDD. Cerafim is a common misspelling of Sarafem.
  • Ceraquil
    Seroquel is a prescription medicine licensed to treat schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how Seroquel works, and describes possible signs of an overdose. Ceraquil is a common misspelling of Seroquel.
  • Certolizumab Pegol Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the recommended starting dose of certolizumab pegol for Crohn's disease is 400 mg every two weeks for three doses. This resource offers more guidelines for taking the drug, including dosing for other conditions.
  • Certolizumab Pegol Information
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, certolizumab pegol is prescribed to treat rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. This article offers information on how the drug is given and what to discuss with your doctor before starting certolizumab pegol.
  • Cervarix and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, although Cervarix is not expected to cause problems in women who are nursing, your healthcare provider may recommend holding off on your vaccination. This article offers more details on breastfeeding and Cervarix.
  • Cervarix and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is generally recommended that pregnant women not receive Cervarix (Human Papillomavirus Bivalent [Types 16 and 18] Vaccine, Recombinant). This article discusses the safety of this vaccine in women who are pregnant.
  • Cervarix Dosage
    Cervarix is typically given as three separate doses over a six-month span. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at the dosing guidelines for Cervarix, including information on what to do if you are late on any of your injections.
  • Cervarix Drug Interactions
    Coumadin and Orencia are just a few of the medications that can cause Cervarix drug interactions. This eMedTV selection discusses these and other medicines that can react with the HPV vaccine, including the potentially negative results.
  • Cervarix Side Effects
    Pain at the injection site, muscle pain, and fatigue are among the commonly reported Cervarix side effects. This eMedTV segment offers a more detailed list of the vaccine's side effects, including serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Cervarix Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Cervarix is used to prevent cervical cancer and precancerous cervical lesions in females between the ages of 9 and 25. This article describes how the vaccine works and what it is used for, including off-label uses.
  • Cervarix Warnings and Precautions
    Although Cervarix does not contain any thimerosal, it does contain aluminum hydroxide. This eMedTV page talks about important Cervarix warnings and precautions to be aware of, explaining why the vaccine may not be suitable for all people.
  • Cervcal Cancer
    Women with an HPV infection may be more likely to develop cervical cancer. This eMedTV Web page lists other risk factors for cervical cancer and explains how to screen for this disease. Cervcal cancer is a common misspelling of cervical cancer.
  • Cervical Cancer Questions
    This eMedTV resource provides a detailed list of questions that a patient with cervical cancer may want to ask her doctor. This article deals with cervical cancer questions relating to surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and other topics.
  • Cervical Cancer Treatment by Stage
    The treatment options for a woman with cervical cancer depend on the stage of her cancer. This eMedTV page talks about cervical cancer treatment by stage. This page also talks about other factors that can influence the choice of treatment.
  • Cervical Dilation During Labor
    This video clip describes what happens during labor and delivery once your cervix has dilated.
  • Cervidil Administration
    This eMedTV article offers a brief description of administration techniques that will be used to insert Cervidil to help induce labor in certain women. This page explains how the drug works and covers the steps your doctor will take when giving this drug.
  • Cervidil and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Cervidil (dinoprostone vaginal insert) is used immediately prior to childbirth, so it is unlikely to be given to women who are nursing. This article takes a closer look at Cervidil and breastfeeding.
  • Cervidil and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment explains that although Cervidil (dinoprostone vaginal insert) is a pregnancy Category C drug, it is licensed for use in pregnant women only. This article describes the potential dangers and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Cervidil Dosage
    As discussed in this eMedTV segment, the dosing instructions for Cervidil are the same for every woman. This article focuses on when and how this medicine will be given. It also explains how long this vaginal insert will be left in the vagina.
  • Cervidil Drug Information
    Pregnant women who have a medical reason to be induced may receive Cervidil to help prepare for delivery. This eMedTV article contains more information on Cervidil, including how the drug works and safety concerns. A link to more details is also included.
  • Cervidil Drug Interactions
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV Web site, Cervidil is not expected to interact with most medicines, with the exception of oxytocin. This article covers why these drugs should not be used at the same time.
  • Cervidil Induction of Labor
    If you have a medical reason that you need to have labor induced, you may receive Cervidil. This eMedTV segment discusses reasons when labor induction with Cervidil may be needed and explains how the drug works to help "ripen" the cervix.
  • Cervidil Insert
    A healthcare provider may prescribe a Cervidil vaginal insert to help prepare the cervix for childbirth. This eMedTV segment explains how this vaginal insert is given, how it works, and when it is removed. A link to more details is also included.
  • Cervidil Labor
    If you are over 41 weeks pregnant or your health is at risk, you may need to induce labor with Cervidil. This eMedTV selection explains how the drug works to help dilate the cervix and lists other situations in which this vaginal insert is recommended.
  • Cervidil Medication
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Cervidil is a medication inserted high in the vagina to help dilate the cervix in preparation for labor and delivery. This article takes a quick look at how this drug works and provides a link to more details.
  • Cervidil Overdose
    As this eMedTV Web page discusses, an overdose of Cervidil (dinoprostone vaginal insert) may cause unusually strong uterine contractions that can lead to stress and fatigue for the baby. Other overdose symptoms and treatment options are also included.
  • Cervidil Side Effects
    Fainting and severe uterine pain may occur in some women who use Cervidil. This eMedTV resource examines the results of clinical studies that looked at side effects of Cervidil, with details on which problems require treatment.
  • Cervidil Uses
    Cervidil is prescribed to thin and soften the cervix in preparation for childbirth. This eMedTV Web selection focuses on why Cervidil is used only when induction is medically necessary. An explanation of how this vaginal insert works is also provided.
  • Cervidil Warnings and Precautions
    Women who have had a previous C-section or vaginal bleeding during the pregnancy should not use Cervidil. This eMedTV article examines important safety precautions to be aware of with Cervidil, including warnings of complications that may occur.
  • Cesarean Section -- Leaving the Hospital
    This video clip deals with the instructions you will be given when you are discharged from the hospital after your cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section -- The Day Of
    This multimedia clip offers information on what happens right before a cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section -- The Procedure
    This interactive video describes in detail what happens during a cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section Alternatives -- Large Baby
    This clip explains the alternatives to cesarean section for a woman with a large baby.
  • Cesarean Section Alternatives -- Medical Conditions
    This video discusses alternatives to c-section in women with certain medical conditions.
  • Cesarean Section Alternatives -- Multiple Pregnancy
    This video segment explains the alternatives to c-section for a woman with multiples.
  • Cesarean Section Alternatives for Problems With the Placenta
    This video clip explains why problems with the placenta may require a cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section Anesthesia
    Anesthesia helps prevent pain during a procedure, and is often administered by an injection in your back. This eMedTV page highlights the most common types of cesarean section anesthesia: spinal and epidural.
  • Cesarean Section Complications -- Major
    This clip describes complications that may occur to a mother and a baby during a C-section.
  • Cesarean Section Complications -- Minor
    Minor complications are possible with cesarean section, which this video clip describes.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Blood Clots
    This video clip talks about the possibility of blood clots after the procedure.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Abnormal Scarring
    This video clip discusses the scar you will have after the procedure.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Bleeding and Blood Vessel Injury
    Bleeding and blood vessel injury may occur during this procedure, which this media clip explains.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Final Thoughts
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  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Infection
    This video explains how to treat infections that may occur during a cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Organ Injury
    There is a risk of organ injury occurring during this procedure, which this media clip addresses.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Postpartum Depression After Childbirth
    This video summarizes common symptoms of postpartum depression.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Postpartum Hemorrhage From the Uterus
    This video clip discusses the risk of postpartum bleeding after the cesarean section.
  • Cesarean Section Risks -- Wound Breakdown
    This video explains why some wounds may not heal well after surgery.
  • Cesarean Section Risks as a Diabetic
    This video explains the risks as a diabetic that are associated with this procedure.
  • Cesarean Section Summary
    This video clip gives an overview of cesarean section.
  • Cesearan
    This eMedTV Web article offers a brief overview of cesarean section, a surgical procedure used to deliver a baby. This page also describes possible complications and provides a link to more information. Cesearan is a common misspelling of cesarean.
  • Cesia
    Cesia is a generic version of Cyclessa, a prescription birth control pill. This page on the eMedTV site provides a complete overview of Cesia, including how it works, when to take it, and what to discuss with your doctor before taking it.
  • Cesia Dosing
    There is one standard dosage of Cesia -- one pill daily, taken at the same time each day. This part of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at Cesia dosing, including an explanation of how missing pills can increase your risk of pregnancy.
  • Cetaximab
    Cetuximab is an anti-cancer drug given through an infusion process into a vein. This eMedTV resource describes this procedure, lists the conditions this drug can treat, and links to more information. Cetaximab is a common misspelling of cetuximab.
  • Ceterizin
    This eMedTV article explains how the medication cetirizine works to treat several allergy symptoms. This article also offers some tips for when and how to take the medicine and lists possible side effects. Ceterizin is a common misspelling of cetirizine.
  • Cetirizine and Pseudoephedrine
    Cetirizine and pseudoephedrine is an over-the-counter drug used to treat several allergy symptoms. This eMedTV article offers an overview of the combination drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects.
  • Cetirizine and Pseudoephedrine Dosage
    Cetirizine and pseudoephedrine tablets are taken by mouth twice a day, with about 12 hours between doses. This eMedTV Web page also provides dosing guidelines for children and tips on taking a cetirizine and pseudoephedrine dosage.
  • Cetirizine and Pseudoephedrine Medicine
    This eMedTV article deals with an allergy medicine called cetirizine and pseudoephedrine. Topics covered in this overview include the specific symptoms the drug can treat, possible side effects, and whether a prescription is needed.
  • Cetirizine Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended cetirizine dosage for most adults and children age six and over is cetirizine 10 mg once daily. This article offers several tips on cetirizine dosing, including how and when the drug should be taken.
  • Cetirizine Side Effects
    Common side effects of cetirizine include fatigue, dry mouth, and drowsiness. This part of the eMedTV Web site explores side effects in adults and children, including information on side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Cetraxal and Breastfeeding
    It is unclear if Cetraxal (ciprofloxacin ear drops) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV resource offers more detailed information on using this product if you are nursing, and also points out why it's important to talk to your healthcare provider.
  • Cetraxal and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe to use Cetraxal (ciprofloxacin ear drops) if you are pregnant. This part of the eMedTV site tells you what you need to know about using these ear drops during pregnancy, including the results of animal studies.
  • Cetraxal Dosage
    The antibiotic ear drop Cetraxal is typically applied twice a day for seven days. As this eMedTV Web page explains, this dose is the same for everyone. This article offers an in-depth discussion on Cetraxal dosing guidelines.
  • Cetraxal Drug Interactions
    At this time, no drug interactions have been reported with Cetraxal. This eMedTV article explains why reactions are unlikely with this antibiotic and talks about why it's still a good idea to tell your healthcare provider about your current medications.
  • Cetraxal Ear Drops
    If you have "swimmer's ear," you may benefit from Cetraxal. This eMedTV article takes a quick look at these prescription ear drops, explaining when and how they should be used. A link to more information on Cetraxal is also provided.
  • Cetraxal Medication Information
    This eMedTV Web article provides some basic information on Cetraxal, a medication used to treat otitis externa. This resource talks about how the ear drops are used and explains what to discuss with your healthcare provider prior to treatment.
  • Cetraxal Otic
    This eMedTV page gives an overview of Cetraxal, which is also known as ciprofloxacin ear drops or ciprofloxacin otic solution. Side effects and dosing are discussed in this article, and a link to more information is included.
  • Cetraxal Overdose
    As explained in this eMedTV page, the exact symptoms of an overdose with Cetraxal (ciprofloxacin ear drops) are unknown. This article offers more details on this topic, including potential symptoms of an oral overdose with Cetraxal's active ingredient.
  • Cetraxal Side Effects
    Headache, fungal ear infection, and ear pain are just a few of the common side effects of Cetraxal. This eMedTV segment provides a more detailed list of potential side effects, including symptoms that require immediate medical attention.
  • Cetraxal Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Cetraxal is mainly used to treat bacterial infections of the outer ear or ear canal. This article takes a closer look at what the drug is used for, how it works, and whether it can be given to children.
  • Cetraxal Warnings and Precautions
    If you are starting treatment with Cetraxal, be aware that it may cause temporary ear irritation. This eMedTV resource highlights other important warning and precautions for Cetraxal users, such as those involving using the drug during pregnancy.
  • Cetririzin
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, cetirizine is a medicine used to treat several allergy symptoms. This page discusses how cetirizine works and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Cetririzin is a common misspelling of cetirizine.
  • Cetrizin
    Cetirizine is used to treat several allergy symptoms, such as sneezing, itchy eyes, and a runny nose. This eMedTV page lists possible side effects of cetirizine and offers some general dosing information. Cetrizin is a common misspelling of cetirizine.
  • Cetrizine
    This eMedTV page gives an overview of cetirizine, a drug used to treat certain allergy symptoms. This page also lists some dosing guidelines and precautions to be aware of before taking the drug. Cetrizine is a common misspelling of cetirizine.
  • Cetuximab and Cancer
    The FDA has approved cetuximab as a cancer treatment in specific cases. This page of the eMedTV Web site describes the types of cancer this drug can treat, explains general dosing guidelines, and links to more information on this topic.
  • Cetuximab and Skin
    Because reactions of the skin are quite common with cetuximab, this eMedTV article describes some of the related side effects that may occur during treatment. Potentially serious skin reactions are also listed, and links to more information are provided.
  • Cetuximab Average Treatment Length
    As this eMedTV page explains, when taking cetuximab, the average treatment length depends on various factors, including the condition being treated. This page discusses this topic in some detail, with a link to more information on dosing guidelines.
  • Cetuximab Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that dosing for cetuximab starts at 400 mg per meter squared for the first week, followed by 250 each week thereafter. If you miss doses, contact your doctor to reschedule so your cancer treatment isn't adversely affected.
  • Cetuximab Drug Information
    This article from the eMedTV site provides some basic information on cetuximab, a drug used to treat certain kinds of cancer. This Web page lists these conditions and describes what to discuss with your healthcare provider prior to beginning treatment.
  • Cetuximab Side Effects
    When using cetuximab, side effects are likely, and may include skin reactions at the injection site. This eMedTV page lists reactions that were reported in clinical trials and describes potentially serious problems that may require prompt medical care.
  • CFS Information
    This eMedTV page provides information on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a condition characterized by profound fatigue that is not improved by rest. This article discusses possible symptoms, explains how often it occurs, and links to more information.
  • CFS Myths
    CFS myths circulating include the false notion that people with the condition lose their fingerprints. This eMedTV article debunks myths concerning chronic fatigue syndrome and recommends credible sources for information about CFS.
  • Chalera
    Cholera is a diarrheal illness caused by a bacterial infection. This eMedTV Web page further explores the causes of cholera, explains how common this illness is, and describes available treatment options. Chalera is a common misspelling of cholera.
  • Chalmydia
    Chlamydia is a bacterial STD that is passed during oral, vaginal, or anal sex. This eMedTV page describes how else chlamydia is spread and explains what complications are associated with the infection. Chalmydia is a common misspelling of chlamydia.
  • Changes in Leg Length With Hip Replacement
    You may notice changes in leg length following hip replacement surgery. This page of the eMedTV library explains why the length of a person's leg may be altered as a consequence of the surgery and how to reduce uncomfortable symptoms, should they occur.
  • Changing Routine (Combination Therapy)
    Sometimes, if your routine keeps changing, it can be hard to follow your treatment plan. This clip offers helpful tips.
  • Changing What You Eat (GERD Treatment)
    This video clip explains how changing what you eat may help relieve your GERD symptoms.
  • Changing Your Life
    Let's face it. Making the necessary lifestyle changes isn't easy. If it were, you would have done it long ago. However, needing to have a stent put in is often just the wake-up call people need in order to get serious about their health.
  • Channing Tatum
    Tatum attributes his battles with depression to his use of medications for ADHD and learning disabilities. While he freely acknowledges that such drugs are certainly beneficial for some people, when he was on them, he said, "it made me a zombieā€¦I would go through wild bouts of depression." if you are interested in alternative treatments for depression, ask your doctor about your options.
  • Chantix Alternatives
    Chantix alternatives can include other smoking cessation medications and counseling. This eMedTV Web page lists common medications that can be used instead of Chantix and explains how beneficial group counseling can be for quitting smoking.
  • Chantix and Dry Mouth
    Some people develop a dry mouth while taking Chantix, but it is not known whether it is caused by the drug. This eMedTV article further explores the link between Chantix and dry mouth, and offers some tips that may provide relief.
  • Chantix and Insomnia
    Insomnia is one of the more common side effects reported by people taking Chantix. This page on the eMedTV Web site further discusses the link between Chantix and insomnia, and includes a list of suggestions for improving sleep habits.
  • Chantix and Pregnancy
    Chantix may not be safe for use in pregnant women. This page from the eMedTV library offers more information on Chantix and pregnancy, including an explanation of the benefits and possible risks of using the drug while you are pregnant.
  • Cheap Lortab
    In an effort to find cheap Lortab, many people will search the Internet. This article from the eMedTV archives offers information about buying Lortab online and discusses the dangers of using Lortab that is purchased without a prescription.
  • Chickenpoks
    Chickenpox is a contagious disease that results in itchy blisters over the entire body. This eMedTV resource explores the cause of chickenpox and explains how the infection is transmitted. Chickenpoks is a common misspelling of chickenpox.
  • Chickenpot
    Chickenpox is a contagious infection that causes itchy blisters all over the body. This eMedTV Web page explains what causes chickenpox and describes how it is spread from person to person. Chickenpot is a common misspelling of chickenpox.
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