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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Brethine Dosage - Buying Xenical Without an Rx

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Brethine Dosage to Buying Xenical Without an Rx. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Brethine Dosage
    Adults and children over the age of 16 usually start with a Brethine dosage of 5 mg three times daily. This eMedTV page also provides Brethine dosing recommendations for children ages 12 to 15 -- and offers some general tips on taking the medication.
  • Brethine Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV site presents some basic information on Brethine, a drug used to treat both asthma and emphysema. This page explains how often this medicine is taken, how it works to treat these conditions, and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Brethine Drug Interactions
    Among the drugs that can potentially interact with Brethine are MAOIs and certain diuretics. This eMedTV resource describes how Brethine drug interactions can decrease the effectiveness of some drugs or increase your risk of serious side effects.
  • Brethine Uses
    Brethine is used for treating emphysema or asthma in adults and children ages 12 and older. As this eMedTV page explains, the drug can also be used "off-label" to treat other conditions. Off-label Brethine uses can include treating preterm labor.
  • Brethine Warnings and Precautions
    Brethine may have a stimulatory effect on the heart and blood pressure. This part of the eMedTV library provides other important Brethine warnings and precautions, including other potential side effects that may occur during treatment with the drug.
  • Brevibloc Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is ideal for a doctor to start with a low dose of Brevibloc and gradually increase the dose as needed. However, there may not be enough time for such a strategy since Brevibloc is often used in emergency situations.
  • Brevibloc Interactions
    Warfarin, reserpine, and morphine are some of the medicines that may cause drug interactions with Brevibloc. This eMedTV Web page describes the potential effects of these interactions and lists other drugs that may cause an interaction.
  • Brevibloc Medication Information
    Are you looking for information on Brevibloc? This eMedTV page presents a brief overview of this medication, with information on how it works, the conditions it can treat, and why the drug is primarily used in emergency situations or for short-term use.
  • Brevibloc Side Effects
    Common side effects of Brevibloc include drowsiness, dizziness, and low blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page provides a more complete list of possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate treatment.
  • Brevibloc Uses
    Brevibloc can treat arrhythmias, rapid heart rates, and hypertension in emergency situations. This eMedTV page discusses the uses of Brevibloc in more detail, describes how the medicine works, and explains whether it is safe for use in children.
  • Brevibloc Warnings and Precautions
    As is possible with all beta blockers, Brevibloc can worsen or even cause heart failure. This eMedTV page offers more warnings and precautions with Brevibloc, including a list of other possible side effects and information on who should not use this drug.
  • Brevicon and Breastfeeding
    Women who are breastfeeding are not typically advised to take Brevicon. This eMedTV segment discusses Brevicon and breastfeeding, including information on how the hormones in birth control pills can decrease the quantity and quality of breast milk.
  • Brevicon and Pregnancy
    You should not take Brevicon if you are pregnant. This eMedTV article explains what to do if you are taking Brevicon and pregnancy occurs. This page also addresses the likelihood of the birth control pill causing miscarriages or birth defects.
  • Brevicon Birth Control Pills
    As this eMedTV article explains, the birth control pill Brevicon works by preventing ovulation in a woman. This segment also describes possible side effects and discusses the importance of taking this medication at the same time each day.
  • Brevicon Dosage
    The standard Brevicon dosage for preventing pregnancy is one tablet once daily, at the same time each day. This eMedTV segment further discusses Brevicon dosing guidelines, including detailed information on what to do if you miss any of the pills.
  • Brevicon Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page explains that certain medications (such as some antibiotics, seizure drugs, and protease inhibitors) may interfere with the effectiveness of Brevicon. Drug interactions such as these can also increase your risk of side effects.
  • Brevicon Overdose
    A Brevicon overdose is unlikely to cause serious problems, but you should still seek immediate medical care. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of an overdose on Brevicon and discusses some of the treatment options that are available.
  • Brevicon Side Effects
    Breast tenderness, nausea, and headaches are some of the side effects you may experience with Brevicon. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at possible Brevicon side effects, including the ones that require immediate medical attention.
  • Brevicon Uses
    Brevicon is mainly used for preventing pregnancy in women of reproductive age. This part of the eMedTV library further discusses what the contraceptive is used for, including a list of several "off-label" Brevicon uses, such as treating acne or PMDD.
  • Brevicon Warnings and Precautions
    Brevicon can make some health conditions worse, such as high blood pressure and depression. This eMedTV article lists other important Brevicon warnings and precautions, including information on what to tell your doctor before starting this pill.
  • Briellyn
    Women seeking an oral contraceptive (birth control pill) may benefit from Briellyn. This eMedTV Web page offers a complete overview of this generic product, with details on side effects, how to take it, drug warnings, and more.
  • Briellyn Birth Control Information
    Briellyn, a generic version of Ovcon 35, is a type of oral contraceptive (birth control pill). This eMedTV selection offers more information on this form of birth control, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting Briellyn.
  • Briellyn Dosage
    Briellyn comes in tablet form and is taken daily. This portion of the eMedTV site offers helpful dosing guidelines for Briellyn, including what to do if you miss any pills and why it's important to pick an easy-to-remember time for taking each dose.
  • Briellyn Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV article, side effects of Briellyn may include things like headaches, spotting between periods, and vomiting. This resource gives a more detailed list of potential side effects and explains what to do if serious reactions occur.
  • Brilinta and Breastfeeding
    This part of the eMedTV site discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Brilinta (ticagrelor). This article addresses whether this medicine passes through breast milk and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Brilinta and Pregnancy
    It is not known if it is safe to use Brilinta (ticagrelor) while pregnant. This eMedTV article describes what happened when the drug was given to pregnant animals, and explains why the FDA classifies Brilinta as a Category C medicine.
  • Brilinta Dosage
    Brilinta comes in tablet form and is typically taken twice a day with aspirin. This eMedTV resource discusses the Brilinta dosing guidelines in detail, with in-depth information on how to take this drug safely and effectively.
  • Brilinta Drug Interactions
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, Brilinta has the potential to interact with miconazole, heparin, NSAIDs, and many other drugs. This article talks about the effects of these interactions and explains how to reduce your risk.
  • Brilinta Medication Information
    This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on Brilinta, a medication used to prevent blood clots, heart attacks, and strokes in certain people. This article gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more details.
  • Brilinta Overdose
    As this eMedTV segment explains, overdosing on Brilinta (ticagrelor) can result in dangerous internal bleeding. This article describes the symptoms that may occur as a result of an overdose and describes the treatment options available.
  • Brilinta Side Effects
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, common Brilinta side effects may include nausea, shortness of breath, and dizziness. This article lists other potential problems, including information on why it's important to watch for signs of bleeding.
  • Brilinta Uses
    Brilinta helps prevent heart attacks and other problems in people with acute coronary syndrome. This eMedTV page talks in greater detail about what Brilinta is used for, with details on how it works, who can use it, and more.
  • Brilinta Warnings and Precautions
    Brilinta can cause shortness of breath and other problems. This eMedTV Web page describes other safety warnings and precautions with Brilinta, including details on who should not use this antiplatelet medication.
  • Brimonidine Dosage
    The standard brimonidine dosage is one drop into the affected eye(s) three times daily. This eMedTV page further discusses dosing guidelines for this eye medication and also outlines some important tips for safely using these medicated eye drops.
  • Brimonidine Eye Drops
    Available only by prescription, brimonidine is used to treat open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This eMedTV Web page provides important information on brimonidine eye drops, including possible side effects and general dosing guidelines.
  • Brimonidine Gel
    Brimonidine gel is prescribed to help treat rosacea. This eMedTV Web selection offers a comprehensive look at this prescription medicine, including how to apply it, possible side effects, and more. It also provides links to specific topics.
  • Brimonidine Gel Dosage
    The standard dose of brimonidine gel requires applying a thin layer of the gel on your skin once daily. This eMedTV article further explores treatment guidelines, including details on when and how to use this drug and how long the effects will last.
  • Brimonidine Gel Information
    By causing the blood vessels to constrict, brimonidine gel can treat redness caused by rosacea. This eMedTV resource contains basic information on brimonidine gel, including how this drug works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Brimonidine Gel Side Effects
    If you use brimonidine gel for treating rosacea, you may develop a burning sensation or facial flushing. This eMedTV page outlines other possible brimonidine gel side effects, including reactions that are potentially severe and require medical care.
  • Brimonidine/Timolol
    Brimonidine/timolol is an eye drop used to lower pressure in the eye. This selection from the eMedTV archives provides an overview of this product, with information on possible side effects, when and how to take your dosage, and more.
  • Brimonidine/Timolol Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, brimonidine/timolol dosing guidelines call for the eye drop to be used twice a day in the affected eye(s). This Web page offers more detailed instructions on when and how to use this prescription medication.
  • Brimonidine/Timolol Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers information on brimonidine/timolol, a prescription drug used to lower pressure in the eye. As explained in this page, the eye drop is designed for people with certain eye conditions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Brintuximab
    Adults who have certain forms of lymphoma may receive a chemotherapy drug called brentuximab vedotin. This eMedTV resource explains specific uses for this drug and general safety issues. Brintuximab is a common misspelling of brentuximab.
  • Brinzolamide Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the recommended dose of brinzolamide is standard for everyone -- one drop in the affected eye three times daily. This page takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for this eye medicine, including tips on how to use it.
  • Brinzolamide Drug Information
    Brinzolamide is a prescription drug used to treat certain eye conditions. This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides more drug information on brinzolamide, including its specific uses, how it works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Brisdelle
    Brisdelle is a drug prescribed for the treatment of hot flashes caused by menopause. This eMedTV Web page describes this non-hormonal medication in more detail, including how it works, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Brisdelle and Breastfeeding
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains that it is not usually recommended for women to use Brisdelle (paroxetine mesylate capsules) while breastfeeding, as this product does pass through breast milk in small amounts.
  • Brisdelle and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Brisdelle (paroxetine mesylate capsules) is not approved for use during pregnancy. This article discusses why Brisdelle is a pregnancy Category X drug and why pregnant women would have no reason to take it.
  • Brisdelle and Suicide
    Brisdelle (paroxetine mesylate capsules) may increase the risk of suicidal behavior in some people. This eMedTV Web selection discusses this topic in more detail and lists potential signs of suicidal behavior to look out for.
  • Brisdelle Dosage
    The usual dosage of Brisdelle is one capsule once daily to treat hot flashes due to menopause. This eMedTV Web selection provides other dosing guidelines, including tips on when and how to most effectively use this non-hormonal medication.
  • Brisdelle Drug Interactions
    Some antibiotics, blood thinners, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may interact with Brisdelle. This eMedTV Web page lists other medications that can interfere with Brisdelle and describes the effects these combinations can cause.
  • Brisdelle Medication Information
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Brisdelle is a non-hormonal drug prescribed to treat hot flashes caused by menopause. This article provides some basic information on Brisdelle, with details on the medication's side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Brisdelle Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource explains, an overdose of Brisdelle (paroxetine mesylate capsules) may cause vomiting, confusion, and liver problems. This article offers a description of what to do in case of an overdose and describes possible treatment options.
  • Brisdelle Side Effects
    Brisdelle may cause a number of side effects, such as nausea, headaches, and fatigue. As this eMedTV page explains, while most reactions are mild, some require urgent medical treatment. This article takes a look at the possible side effects of this drug.
  • Brisdelle Uses
    Brisdelle is prescribed for treating hot flashes in women going through menopause. This eMedTV segment talks about Brisdelle's uses in more detail, including how this non-hormonal product works and whether there are any off-label uses.
  • Brisdelle Warnings and Precautions
    If you have glaucoma or a history of suicidal thoughts, tell your doctor before taking Brisdelle. This eMedTV article offers other important Brisdelle warnings and precautions, including information on who should avoid this medicine entirely.
  • Britney Spears
    After being scrutinized for smoking tobacco cigarettes too close to her children, Britney Spears can now be spotted using the e-cigs. Britney has publicly reported that it was electronic cigarettes that have allowed her to take control of her life and finally "win" her battle against the habit.
  • Broken Ankle
    This multimedia file explains how ankle fractures occur and discusses treatment options.
  • Bromday and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Bromday (bromfenac) passes through breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web site explains how no research has been done on the possible risks of breastfeeding while using Bromday and what your doctor may advise.
  • Bromday and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article discusses Bromday (bromfenac) and pregnancy. It talks about the results of animal studies, how the FDA rates the safety of drugs during pregnancy, and circumstances in which the medication may be used.
  • Bromday Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, the standard dose of Bromday is one drop used in the affected eye(s) once a day. This article also gives a list of tips for how to use these eye drops and discusses ways to avoid contaminating the medicine.
  • Bromday Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page offers details on some of the products that may cause drug interactions with Bromday. This article describes the complications that may occur and discusses whether Bromday can be used with other eye drop medications.
  • Bromday Generic Drug
    Due to certain exclusivity rights, companies are not allowed to make a generic Bromday drug at this time. This eMedTV Web selection explains when a generic version of these eye drops might become available and offers a link to more details.
  • Bromday Ophthalmic Drops
    If you have cataract surgery, you may receive Bromday ophthalmic eye drops to reduce pain and swelling. This eMedTV article offers dosing guidelines for these eye drops, along with possible side effects and safety issues.
  • Bromday Overdose
    If too much Bromday (bromfenac) is used, it may cause eye stinging or burning. This eMedTV article offers more details on what to expect, including information on how this type of overdose may be treated.
  • Bromday Side Effects
    Notify your doctor immediately if you develop blocked vision that does not improve after using Bromday. This eMedTV page describes some of the other potentially dangerous Bromday side effects that may require treatment, as well as less-serious reactions.
  • Bromday Uses
    As this eMedTV article explains, Bromday is used to reduce eye pain and inflammation that can occur due to cataract surgery. This article takes a closer look at the drug's uses, with details on how Bromday works and if it is safe for children.
  • Bromday Warnings and Precautions
    Using Bromday may increase the risk for bleeding problems in some people. This part of the eMedTV Web site examines other important precautions and warnings for Bromday, including information on who should not use these eye drops.
  • Bromeday
    As this eMedTV page explains, Bromday is used to reduce pain and inflammation caused by cataract surgery. This page explains how to use these eye drops safely and discusses some general safety issues. Bromeday is a common misspelling of Bromday.
  • Bromelain and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that women may not be able to take bromelain while breastfeeding. Bromelain has not been studied in clinical trials and it may not be safe or effective for anyone, including breastfeeding women and their infants.
  • Bromelain Drug Interactions
    Certain antibiotics or anticoagulant medications may interfere with bromelain. This eMedTV Web resource lists other medications that can cause bromelain drug interactions and describes the complications these interactions may cause.
  • Bromelain Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that the exact effects of a bromelain overdose are not known. However, as this article discusses, bromelain may cause dangerous internal bleeding. This page also covers possible treatment options for an overdose.
  • Bromelain Supplement Information
    Bromelain is a type of enzyme that may have several medicinal effects. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at bromelain, with information on the conditions this supplement is used for and some safety warnings to keep in mind.
  • Bromfenac and Breastfeeding
    Is bromfenac safe to use while breastfeeding? This eMedTV article examines whether the medicated eye drops pass through breast milk and lists potential side effects that may occur in a breastfed infant.
  • Bromfenac and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment addresses the potential safety concerns with using bromfenac during pregnancy. This article takes a look at whether it is safe for pregnant women to use these eye drops and discusses what your doctor may advise in these situations.
  • Bromfenac Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, your dose of bromfenac will depend on the particular product you are prescribed. This page further discusses what to expect when using this medication. It also outlines some tips for when and how the eye drops are applied.
  • Bromfenac Drops Side Effects
    Sensitivity to light and eye itching are some of the common side effects of bromfenac eye drops. This eMedTV article describes other possible reactions with this drug, including those that are potentially dangerous and require medical attention.
  • Bromfenac Eye Drops
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, bromfenac eye drops are used once or twice daily to reduce eye pain and swelling caused by cataract surgery. It offers more details on this drug, including possible side effects, safety concerns, and more.
  • Bromfenac Ophthalmic
    Bromfenac ophthalmic solution is used to reduce eye swelling and pain after cataract surgery. This eMedTV page examines these eye drops, with tips on how to use them and details on possible side effects that may occur.
  • Bromfenac Ophthalmic Solution Information
    Bromfenac ophthalmic solution is prescribed to reduce eye pain and swelling caused by cataract surgery. This eMedTV page features more information on bromfenac ophthalmic solution, including potential side effects, safety issues to be aware of, and more.
  • Bromfenac Opthalmic Solution
    Bromfenac is prescribed to reduce eye pain and swelling due to cataract surgery. This eMedTV page explores the drug in more detail and offers general precautions. Bromfenac opthalmic solution is a common misspelling of bromfenac ophthalmic solution.
  • Bromfenac Overdose
    This eMedTV segment discusses the potential problems that may occur due to an overdose of bromfenac, such as eye redness and burning. It lists other potential overdose effects and gives a description of the treatment options.
  • Bromfenac Side Effects
    Headaches, itchy eyes, and blurred vision are some of the possible side effects of bromfenac. This eMedTV resource further explores possible reactions to this drug. It also explains when side effects are serious and require medical attention.
  • Bromocriptin
    Bromocriptine is a medicine used to treat acromegaly, parkinsonism, and hyperprolactinemia. This eMedTV page explains how bromocriptine works and links to more detailed information about the drug. Bromocriptin is a common misspelling of bromocriptine.
  • Bromocriptine Dosage
    For acromegaly treatment, most people usually end up taking a bromocriptine dosage of 20 to 30 mg daily. This eMedTV resource provides detailed bromocriptine dosing guidelines for the treatment of hyperprolactinemia, parkinsonism, and other conditions.
  • Bromocriptine Mesylate Information
    Are you looking for information on bromocriptine mesylate? As this eMedTV segment explains, this medication is approved for many medical conditions, such as type 2 diabetes. This article takes a look at what bromocriptine is used for and how it is taken.
  • Bromocryptine
    A doctor may prescribe bromocriptine to treat parkinsonism, hyperprolactinemia, or acromegaly. This eMedTV article describes this drug in more detail and lists some of its potential side effects. Bromocryptine is a common misspelling of bromocriptine.
  • Bronchopleural Fistulas and Lobectomy
    As this eMedTV page explains, a bronchopleural fistula after a lobectomy may result in fever, breathing difficulties, and coughing up blood. This portion of the Web site offers more information on bronchopleural fistulas and lobectomy.
  • Bronchopleural Fistulas and Pneumonectomy
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is a link between bronchopleural fistulas and pneumonectomy, in that after the surgery, fluid or air can get into the space in your chest. Symptoms include fever, difficulty breathing, and coughing up blood.
  • Brovana and Breastfeeding
    At this time, it is not known whether Brovana (arformoterol tartrate) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV resource provides more information on Brovana and breastfeeding, and explains why women of reproductive age are unlikely to use this drug.
  • Brovana and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using Brovana (arformoterol tartrate) during pregnancy are not known at this time. This eMedTV article offers more information on Brovana and pregnancy, and describes the potential risks of using the drug during pregnancy.
  • Brovana Dosage
    The recommended Brovana dosage is one vial using a nebulizer twice a day. This page from the eMedTV Web site discusses Brovana dosing in more detail and provides information on how and when to take the drug (and how to use the nebulizer).
  • Brovana Drug Information
    If you have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), your healthcare provider may recommend Brovana. This eMedTV selection provides more information on this drug, explaining how often to use it and what to discuss with your doctor.
  • Brovana Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Brovana drug interactions include corticosteroids, theophylline, and MAOIs. This eMedTV segment contains a list of other medicines that may interact with Brovana and describes the potentially negative effects that may occur.
  • Brovana Overdose
    Potential Brovana (arformoterol tartrate) overdose symptoms include nausea, shakiness, and fatigue. This eMedTV segment lists other possible signs of a Brovana overdose and describes the supportive treatment options that are available for an overdose.
  • Brovana Side Effects
    Back pain, leg cramps, and diarrhea are some of the most commonly reported Brovana side effects. This eMedTV page provides a more complete list of other reported side effects, including serious side effects of Brovana that require medical attention.
  • Brovana Uses
    Brovana is used for preventing airway spasms caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This eMedTV Web page further explains what the medication is used for, explains whether it is approved for use in children, and lists off-label Brovana uses.
  • Brovana Warnings and Precautions
    Brovana can have a stimulatory effect on the heart and blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page lists other side effects or problems that may occur with Brovana. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also included in this article.
  • Bruno Mars
    In an effort to quit smoking for his mother, Bruno Mars not only switched to using e-cigs but also signed up as an investor to financially back NJOY, an electronic cigarette company. On Mother's Day, he started using NJOY's e-cigs to kick the habit.
  • Bryce Howard
    Postpartum depression is not the same thing as what are commonly called "the baby blues," as actress Bryce Dallas Howard discovered after the birth of her child. "[My husband] would ask what he could do to help, but knowing there was nothing he could do, I screamed expletives at him." A woman can feel exhausted, exasperated, and angry when adjusting to life with a newborn, but these feelings disappear as time passes. If they don't, or if other symptoms develop, you need to consider a diagnosis of postpartum depression.
  • Bubble Up Your Juice
    One hundred percent fruit juice is a good alternative to soda; however, adding a bit of seltzer water to the mix gives you the sensation of soda.
  • Budeprion SR Dosing
    The recommended starting Budeprion SR dosage for treating depression is 150 mg once daily in the morning. This eMedTV article also discusses Budeprion SR dosing for people with liver problems, as well as some factors that can affect your dosage.
  • Budeprion SR Drug Information
    This eMedTV article offers information on budeprion SR, a prescription drug used to treat depression. Safety issues, side effects, and dosing information are briefly discussed, and a link to a full-length article is included.
  • Budeprion XL Dosing
    The recommended starting Budeprion XL dosage is usually 150 mg, taken once a day in the morning. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at Budeprion XL dosing guidelines and offers some instructions for when and how to take the medication.
  • Budeprion XL Drug Information
    Budeprion XL is a medication used to treat depression and seasonal affective disorder. This eMedTV page contains more information on Budeprion XL, noting how this drug works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Budeprionxl
    Budeprion XL is prescription medicine licensed for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV article covers other Budeprion XL uses, explains how the drug works, and lists potential side effects. Budeprionxl is a common misspelling of Budeprion XL.
  • Budesinide
    Available by prescription, budesonide is a drug approved to treat Crohn's disease, allergies, and more. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Budesinide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budesonid
    Asthma and Crohn's disease are two of the conditions that can be treated with budesonide. This eMedTV segment takes a brief look at the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Budesonid is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budesonida
    Budesonide is a prescription medicine approved to treat asthma, allergies, and more. This eMedTV article briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Budesonida is the Spanish name for budesonide.
  • Budesonide and Formoterol
    Budesonide and formoterol is a combination medicine that is prescribed to treat asthma and COPD. This eMedTV article describes the effects of budesonide and formoterol, explains how and when to use the inhaler, and offers dosing information for the drug.
  • Budesonide and Formoterol (Symbicort)
    As this eMedTV segment explains, healthcare providers often prescribe budesonide and formoterol (Symbicort) for people with asthma or COPD. This article gives a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information.
  • Budesonide and Formoterol Dosing
    Many people use a budesonide and formoterol dose of two inhalations twice daily. This part of the eMedTV archives offers other information on budesonide and formoterol dosing guidelines and includes suggestions on when and how to use the inhaler.
  • Budosenide
    Budesonide is a drug used to treat allergies, asthma, and other conditions. This part of the eMedTV library talks about budesonide, including an explanation of how the prescription medication works. Budosenide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Budosinide
    A prescription drug, budesonide is used to treat conditions such as allergies and asthma. This eMedTV Web page briefly describes budesonide and provides a link to more information on the topic. Budosinide is a common misspelling of budesonide.
  • Bumex Medication
    The prescription medication Bumex is prescribed to treat water retention. This eMedTV segment takes a quick look at this product, including common side effects, how to take it, and more. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Buniva
    Doctors often prescribe Boniva to postmenopausal women to help prevent and treat osteoporosis. This eMedTV article describes the effects of Boniva and explains what to be aware of before using this drug. Buniva is a common misspelling of Boniva.
  • Buprenex Injection Information
    Buprenex is a prescription pain medicine. As this eMedTV segment explains, it is classified as a controlled substance. This article offers more information on this injection, explaining how Buprenex works. A link to more details is also included.
  • Buprenex Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Buprenex include nausea, dizziness, and drowsiness. This eMedTV article lists other possible side effects of the drug, including potentially serious problems that require medical attention (such as fainting and seizures).
  • Buprenorfin
    Buprenorphine comes in many forms and is classified as a "controlled substance." This eMedTV segment briefly describes this drug, including what it is used for, and offers a link to more information. Buprenorfin is a common misspelling of buprenorphine.
  • Buprenorphene
    If you have moderate-to-severe pain, you may benefit from the prescription drug buprenorphine. This eMedTV Web page talks about who can use it and describes the forms in which it is available. Buprenorphene is a common misspelling of buprenorphine.
  • Buprenorphin
    Your healthcare provider may prescribe buprenorphine as a treatment for certain types of pain. This eMedTV resource explains what else this medication is used for and lists some of its side effects. Buprenorphin is a common misspelling of buprenorphine.
  • Buprenorphine and Naloxone
    Available by prescription only, buprenorphine and naloxone is taken to treat opioid dependence. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at this drug, including details on how it works, tips on when and how to use it, and possible side effects.
  • Buprenorphine Dosage
    The long-lasting forms of buprenorphine (Subutex and Suboxone) only need to be taken once a day. This eMedTV page lists the dosage guidelines for other forms of buprenorphine, explaining how often to use this drug and factors that will affect your dose.
  • Buprenorphine Injection
    The buprenorphine injection is a prescription pain reliever that is classified as a controlled substance. This eMedTV page describes the effects of the medicine, offers dosing information, and explains how this drug works to treat moderate-to-severe pain.
  • Buprenorphine Side Effects
    Commonly reported buprenorphine side effects include nausea, sedation, headache, and constipation. This eMedTV resource talks in more detail about the potential reactions to this opioid medication, including what to do if serious side effects occur.
  • Bupronex
    Buprenex is a prescription drug approved for relieving pain. This eMedTV Web selection describes how Buprenex works, lists possible side effects, and explains how the medication is administered. Bupronex is a common misspelling of Buprenex.
  • Bupronorphine
    As this eMedTV article explains, buprenorphine is used for the treatment of pain or opioid dependence. This Web page takes a quick look at this drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Bupronorphine is a common misspelling of buprenorphine.
  • Bupropion HCl SR
    As explained in this eMedTV article, bupropion SR is the long-acting version of bupropion hydrochloride (HCl). This resource gives a brief overview of this sustained-release drug, including what it is used for and what to expect during treatment.
  • Bupropion Hydrobromide
    Available by prescription, bupropion hydrobromide is a drug used to treat depression. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at this antidepressant, including information on how it works, tips for when and how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Buproprion Hydrobromide
    Bupropion hydrobromide is a drug prescribed for the treatment of depression. This eMedTV resource describes how this medicine works and explains what to discuss with your doctor. Buproprion hydrobromide is a common misspelling of bupropion hydrobromide.
  • Busulfan Chemotherapy Information
    As explained in this eMedTV article, busulfan is used to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia in adults and children. This resource provides more information on busulfan and describes safety issues to be aware of while using this chemotherapy drug.
  • Busulphan
    Busulfan is a prescription medicine taken once daily to treat chronic myelogenous leukemia. This eMedTV resource discusses how this drug works and outlines some of the potential side effects. Bulsulphan is a common misspelling of busulfan.
  • Butrans Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Butrans include nausea, headaches, and dizziness. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of side effects and also explains which reactions to the skin patch are potentially serious and require medical care.
  • Butterbur for Allergies
    This eMedTV page explains that when using butterbur for allergies, this supplement may work by decreasing production of certain substances in the body responsible for many symptoms of allergies. This page also covers some important safety concerns.
  • Butterbur for Headaches
    Research has indicated that it may be effective to use butterbur for headaches. This eMedTV segment describes studies that have shown butterbur may work for preventing migraine headaches in adults and children as young as six years old.
  • Butterbur for Migraines
    When using butterbur for migraines, this supplement may help treat or prevent such headaches. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look how butterbur may help relieve migraines, including whether this herbal supplement is effective for children.
  • Butterbur Research
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, butterbur research has indicated that this herbal supplement may be effective at preventing migraine headaches and possibly treating allergies. This page further discusses the effectiveness of butterbur.
  • Buy Morphine Online
    You can buy morphine online. However, as this eMedTV Web resource explains, you should find an online pharmacy that is part of VIPPS and that requires a legitimate prescription. This page offers other tips on how to legitimately buy this drug online.
  • Buying Morphine Without a Prescription
    As this eMedTV Web segment explains, it is not safe or legal to buy morphine without a prescription. This article discusses how buying the drug without a prescription may increase your risk of potential drug interactions or other serious problems.
  • Buying Xenical Without an Rx
    Xenical is a weight loss aid that is available by prescription only. As this eMedTV page explains, although buying Xenical without an Rx is not an option, there is currently an over-the-counter version of the medication that is sold by the name Alli.
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