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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Axert - Balmex

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Axert to Balmex. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Axert
    Axert is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a migraine headache as it occurs. This eMedTV article explains how Axert works to narrow blood vessels in the head, and also lists possible side effects of the drug and tips on how to take it.
  • Axert Medication
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Axert is used to treat migraine headaches. This article looks at how to take this medication, what to expect, and more. A link to a full-length article on this triptan drug is also provided.
  • Axid
    Axid is a drug commonly used to treat duodenal ulcers, gastric ulcers, and GERD. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides a detailed overview of Axid (which is available both by prescription and over-the-counter) and links to more information.
  • Axid Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web page contains information on Axid, a drug used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and other conditions. Topics discussed in this article include how it works, when to take it, and more.
  • Axiety
    People with anxiety disorders often experience excessive, irrational fear and dread. This eMedTV page lists different types of anxiety disorders, features they share, and treatment options. Axiety is a common misspelling of anxiety.
  • Axiron
    If you have low testosterone levels, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Axiron. This eMedTV segment gives a complete overview of this anabolic steroid, with information on how it works, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Axitinib
    Axitinib is a drug used to treat kidney cancer that has spread to other areas in the body. This eMedTV Web selection takes a detailed look at this chemotherapy medicine, with information on how it is taken, how it works, safety issues, and more.
  • Azactam
    Azactam is a medication prescribed to treat a number of bacterial infections. This eMedTV Web selection offers an in-depth look at this medication, including specific uses, possible side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Azactam Antibiotic Information
    Azactam is prescribed to treat a variety of bacterial infections in adults and children. This portion of the eMedTV library contains more information on this antibiotic, including details on when Azactam is used, how it is given, and side effects.
  • Azactam for UTI
    Healthcare providers may prescribe Azactam to treat a UTI (urinary tract infection). This eMedTV segment explains how this drug works to treat this and various other bacterial infections.
  • Azactam Medication
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Azactam is a medication prescribed to treat a variety of bacterial infections. This article contains more information, including general dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and important safety precautions.
  • Azactom
    Azactam is one of the many antibiotics available today. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Azactam and provides a link to more detailed information. Azactom is a common misspelling of Azactam.
  • Azalex
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, Azelex is a prescription skin cream licensed to treat inflammatory acne. This article also describes common side effects and provides some general dosing guidelines. Azalex is a common misspelling of Azelex.
  • Azathioprine
    Azathioprine is a drug that is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and prevent kidney transplant rejection. This eMedTV page provides an overview of this prescription medication, including information on how it works and potential side effects.
  • Azathioprine (Imuran) Information
    This eMedTV segment features information on azathioprine (Imuran), a medication used to treat a certain type of arthritis and prevent organ rejection. This article takes a quick look at how it works, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Azelaic Acid Cream
    Available by prescription only, azelaic acid cream is a skin medication used to treat acne. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at this drug, including information on side effects, when and how to apply it, safety precautions, and more.
  • Azelaic Acid Gel
    Available by prescription only, azelaic acid gel is a drug that treats rosacea. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at this medication, providing information on when and how to use it, possible side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Azelastine
    Azelastine is a prescription nasal spray used for treating seasonal allergic rhinitis or vasomotor rhinitis. This eMedTV segment explores the effects of azelastine, describes how it works, and explains what you should know before taking the drug.
  • Azelastine Hydrochloride Nasal Spray
    As this eMedTV page explains, the nasal spray azelastine hydrochloride can help relieve itching, stuffiness, and other symptoms related to both types of rhinitis. This segment also addresses common side effects and how this product works.
  • Azelect
    Azilect is a prescription medication licensed to treat Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Azilect, explains how it works, and provides a link to more information on the drug. Azelect is a common misspelling of Azilect.
  • Azelex
    Azelex is a prescription skin cream used to treat acne. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at this product, explaining how it works, when and how to apply it, potential side effects, general safety precautions, and more.
  • Azelex and Pregnancy
    In general, it is probably safe for pregnant women to use Azelex (azelaic acid cream). This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at this topic, including an explanation of why the FDA has classified Azelex as a pregnancy Category B drug.
  • Azelex Cream
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Azelex to treat acne. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this skin medication, including how to use Azelex cream, possible side effects, and some safety precautions. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Azelex for Acne
    Available by prescription only, Azelex is used for acne treatment. This eMedTV segment further explores this medicated skin cream, including how it works and how it compares to other acne medications. A link to more information is also included.
  • Azilec
    Azilect is a prescription drug approved for treating Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV resource explains how Azilect works, lists some of its potential side effects, and links to more information on the drug. Azilec is a common misspelling of Azilect.
  • Azilect
    Azilect is a Parkinson's disease medication available by prescription only. This page from the eMedTV library describes how Azilect works, explains when and how to take the medicine, and lists side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Azilsartan
    Azilsartan is a prescription drug approved to lower blood pressure. This eMedTV Web selection takes an in-depth look at this medication, with details on how it works, potential side effects, tips for when and how to take it, and general safety concerns.
  • Azithromicin
    Azithromycin is an antibiotic prescribed to treat bacterial infections and sexually transmitted diseases. This eMedTV segment covers how the drug works and describes some general precautions. Azithromicin is a common misspelling of azithromycin.
  • Azithromicyn
    Azithromycin is a medicine prescribed to treat bacterial infections and sexually transmitted diseases. This eMedTV Web article further discusses azithromycin uses and lists possible side effects. Azithromicyn is a common misspelling of azithromycin.
  • Azithromycin
    Azithromycin is a prescription antibiotic that is prescribed to treat numerous common infections. This eMedTV article lists some specific infections that can be treated with azithromycin and discusses azithromycin effects, strengths, and side effects.
  • Azithromycin Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the suggested dosage of azithromycin for treating most bacterial infections is 250 mg or 500 mg daily for three to five days. This page also covers dosing for children and for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Azithromycin Side Effects
    Some common azithromycin side effects include vomiting, abdominal pain (or stomach pain), and headache. This eMedTV article also lists serious side effects of azithromycin (like hives or hives) and side effects that occur rarely (such as dehydration).
  • Azithromycine
    This eMedTV page explains that azithromycin is a prescription medication used to treat bacterial infections and STDs. This page also covers what to tell your doctor before taking the drug. Azithromycine is a common misspelling of azithromycin.
  • Azmacord
    Azmacort is a prescription drug often used to prevent, but not treat, asthma attacks. This segment of the eMedTV library provides a brief overview of the drug and also includes a link to more information. Azmacord is a common misspelling of Azmacort.
  • Azmacort
    Azmacort is commonly prescribed to prevent (rather than treat) asthma attacks. This page on the eMedTV Web site takes an in-depth look at how the medication works, highlights potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to use the inhaler.
  • Azmacort Inhaler
    As of December 2009, Azmacort inhalers are no longer being produced. This segment of the eMedTV library explains why and includes a link for those who want more details on this asthma medication.
  • Azmanex
    Asmanex is commonly prescribed to help prevent asthma attacks. This page from the eMedTV library explains who can take the drug, how often it is taken, and possible side effects. Azmanex is a common misspelling of Asmanex.
  • Azopt
    Azopt is a prescription eye drop licensed to treat high eye pressure. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains how this medication works, describes possible side effects, and covers some general dosing guidelines.
  • Azopt 1% Information
    As this eMedTV article discusses, Azopt is a medication prescribed for treating open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This article offers important information on Azopt 1% ophthalmic suspension, including dosing tips and possible side effects.
  • Azopt Eye Drop Information
    Available by prescription, Azopt is a medication used to treat open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension. This eMedTV Web article provides important information on Azopt eye drops, including possible side effects and safety precautions.
  • Azopt for Glaucoma
    Azopt is a type of eye medication approved for treating open-angle glaucoma. This eMedTV Web page further discusses using Azopt for glaucoma treatment, including how the drug works to lower eye pressure. Other possible uses are also listed.
  • Azopt Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Azopt include blurred vision and an unusual taste. This eMedTV Web segment explores the severity of these and other side effects, and describes which ones may require immediate medical attention.
  • AZOR
    AZOR is a prescription medicine that is approved for treating high blood pressure. This article on the eMedTV site offers dosing information on AZOR, describes possible effects of the medicine, and explains what you should know before taking it.
  • AZOR High Blood Pressure Medicine
    As this eMedTV article explains, AZOR is a medicine used in the treatment of high blood pressure. This segment explains how this product works and what to discuss with the healthcare provider prescribing it, with a link to more information.
  • Azothioprine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, azathioprine may be used to prevent kidney transplant rejection or treat rheumatoid arthritis. This page also explains the factors that may affect your dosage. Azothioprine is a common misspelling of azathioprine.
  • Azulfadine
    Azulfidine is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat symptoms of ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and offers information on its effects and possible side effects. Azulfadine is a common misspelling of Azulfidine.
  • Azulfidine
    Azulfidine is a prescription medicine that is commonly used for treating ulcerative colitis. This eMedTV Web page offers a general overview of the drug, including information on how it works, its effects, possible side effects, and more.
  • Azulfidine 500 Mg Tablets
    This eMedTV segment explains that Azulfidine comes in the form of 500-mg tablets; however, the amount you are prescribed will be based on various factors. This page describes the general starting dose for adults and links to more information on dosing.
  • Azulfidine for Ulcerative Colitis
    If you have ulcerative colitis, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called Azulfidine. This eMedTV article explains how this prescription drug works to treat this condition and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Azulfidine Medication Information
    This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of Azulfidine, an ulcerative colitis drug. This article provides basic information on what to expect while taking this medication and offers some dosing guidelines. A link to more details is also included.
  • Azythromycin
    Azithromycin is a prescription antibiotic used to treat several conditions, such as bacterial infections. This eMedTV page takes a look at possible side effects and dosing guidelines for this drug. Azythromycin is a common misspelling of azithromycin.
  • B-12 Defiency
    Although a vitamin B12 deficiency is easily treatable, it can cause serious problems if left untreated. This eMedTV segment lists signs of a deficiency and various treatment options. B12 defiency is a common misspelling of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • B-12 Eeficency
    A vitamin B12 deficiency may cause fatigue, weight loss, and poor memory. This eMedTV resource lists other possible signs of a deficiency and explains what treatments are available. B-12 deficency is a common misspelling of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • B12 Defficiency
    Poor memory, weakness, and constipation are possible signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency. This eMedTV page explains how deficiencies are treated and lists other signs of the condition. B12 defficiency is a common misspelling of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • B12 Deficency
    A vitamin B12 deficiency is a condition that is easily treatable with supplementation. This eMedTV article lists signs of a vitamin B12 deficiency and further explains how it is treated. B12 deficency is a common misspelling of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • B12 Deficiency
    A vitamin B12 deficiency can lead to permanent nerve damage if left untreated. This eMedTV Web page offers information on who is at a higher risk for developing this problem. B12 deficiency is a common variation of vitamin B12 deficiency.
  • Baby Advice
    As a new parent or parent-to-be, it is likely that many people will offer their advice on parenting. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at good and bad advice people may offer and provides tips on how to deal with unwarranted baby advice.
  • Baby Boys' Names
    There are thousands of baby boys' names, each with its own meaning, origin, and variations. This eMedTV resource discusses ways to choose a name for your baby boy and provides a link to BabyBuilder -- a database of more than 75,000 baby names.
  • Baby Care Week by Week Information
    This eMedTV resource describes the changes your baby will undergo in the first two weeks of life and lists questions you may have. There is also a link to a health channel with information on what to expect week by week as your baby grows.
  • Baby Colic
    As this page of the eMedTV Web site explains, in a baby, colic is typically defined as crying for more than three hours straight at least three days a week for more than three weeks. This page also discusses possible causes and how long colic lasts.
  • Baby Colic Information
    Are you concerned your baby has colic? This eMedTV selection presents some important information on this topic, including its characteristics, how long the condition lasts, and why it does not mean something is necessarily wrong with your baby.
  • Baby Diaper Rash
    With most cases of diaper rash, babies between 9 and 12 months old are affected. This article from the eMedTV Web site discusses some of the common causes of diaper rashes and explains how you can treat the rash with home remedies.
  • Baby Feeding Chart
    The number and frequency of feedings for a newborn will change dramatically in the first few months. This eMedTV Web page includes a chart of standard baby feeding schedules provided by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • Baby Formula Feeding
    All infant formulas are designed to be the best possible substitute for natural human breast milk. This eMedTV resource provides some general tips on formula feeding your baby and describes the three different ways that formulas are prepared.
  • Baby Girl Names
    With all the baby girl names available, choosing the perfect one will take some thought and effort. This eMedTV article offers tips for picking a great name for a baby girl and provides links to a name creation tool containing more than 75,000 names.
  • Baby Nutrition Needs
    About 50 percent of a baby's nutritional needs will come from solid foods by the end of their first year. This eMedTV segment discusses the importance of incorporating certain solid foods into your child's diet at around four to six months of age.
  • Baby Proofing
    As this eMedTV segment explains, installing outlet covers, carbon monoxide detectors, and baby gates are some ways to make your home safer for your baby. This article offers several suggestions for baby proofing your home room by room.
  • Baby Teeth Order
    Babies between 6 and 10 months of age typically begin to show the first signs of teething. This page from the eMedTV site explains what happens during the teething process and provides a chart that shows the order in which baby teeth come in.
  • Baby Teething Age
    In general, 6 to 10 months is the average age for babies to show teething signs. This segment from the eMedTV Web site explains what teeth will come in first and includes a timeline for when all the other teeth will typically appear.
  • Baby Teething Information
    The average baby begins teething at around 6 to 10 months of age. This page of the eMedTV library provides more information about teething in babies, including a list of possible symptoms that may indicate teeth are coming in and which ones emerge first.
  • Baby's First Solid Foods
    Your baby should start with solid foods that are easily digested, such as single grain cereals. This part of the eMedTV library provides tips on when and how to introduce these first solid foods to your baby and explains what foods to try next.
  • Bacillus Anthracis
    Bacillus anthracis is the bacterium that causes anthrax. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at this bacterium, explaining how its hardiness and toxicity make it a formidable bioterrorism agent and how it is transmitted.
  • Back Brace for Scoliosis
    There are two types of back braces for scoliosis: the Milwaukee brace and the thoracolumbosacral orthosis. This eMedTV segment describes these devices and explains how a back brace can stop a spinal curve from getting worse.
  • Back Exercises
    Partial sit-ups, bridges, and other back exercises can reduce a person's risk of developing lower back pain. This eMedTV article includes information and pictures on the correct way to perform these exercises, which will help keep the back healthy.
  • Back Injury Prevention
    As this eMedTV resource explains, an important part of back injury prevention involves exercises that don't strain the back, maintaining correct posture, and lifting heavy items correctly. This page highlights these and other key factors, such as diet.
  • Back Pain
    Although most people will not need to see a doctor for back pain, certain symptoms call for a consultation. This eMedTV discusses the types and symptoms of back problems that cause pain and explains what to do if they occur.
  • Back Pain During Pregnancy
    During pregnancy, lower back pain can be caused by several factors, such as hormonal changes. This eMedTV Web page discusses other factors that can cause back pain when pregnant and offers helpful tips on how to prevent and relieve it.
  • Back Pain Information
    Are you looking for information on back pain? This eMedTV Web page presents a brief overview of this all-too-common medical condition, including the difference between chronic and acute pain and when you should see your healthcare provider.
  • Back Pain Medication
    Analgesic medications, such as aspirin and acetaminophen, are designed specifically to reduce pain. This eMedTV article discusses the types of prescribed and over-the-counter back pain medications that are used as a treatment for back pain.
  • Back Pain Research
    Current areas of back pain research are discussed in this eMedTV Web page. As this article explains, researchers are currently focusing on different drugs to treat back pain, different ways to manage back pain, and more.
  • Back Pain Treatment
    Common non-surgical chronic back pain treatment options include hot or cold packs, exercise, and medications. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the various treatments for back pain, including complementary and alternative therapy.
  • Back Pain Treatments
    This article on the eMedTV site lists the various treatments for back pain, such as medications and hot/cold packs. This segment also describes when such treatments are recommended and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Back Surgery
    Back surgery is typically only used when other treatments have failed. As this eMedTV resource explains, it may also be considered if back pain is caused by a tumor, an infection, or a nerve root problem. The different surgeries are also described.
  • Background on Ebola
    This eMedTV article provides some background on Ebola, with information on what it is, common symptoms, how it is treated, and more. Also included in this brief article is a link to more detailed information.
  • Baclafen
    Baclofen is a medication used to treat spasticity caused by MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV Web segment provides some general precautions to be aware of before using this medicine. Baclafen is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclofan
    Baclofen can help treat spasticity due to MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of this prescription medicine and describes possible side effects. Baclofan is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclofen
    Baclofen is a prescription medication used for treating spasticity caused by MS or a spinal cord problem. This eMedTV Web resource offers a more in-depth look at this drug, including its effects, dosage guidelines, and general precautions and warnings.
  • Baclofen 10 mg
    If you have spasticity caused by brain or spinal cord damage, your doctor may prescribe baclofen 10 mg. This eMedTV resource outlines dosing guidelines for the various forms of baclofen and offers tips on using this medication safely.
  • Baclofen 20 mg
    A doctor may prescribe baclofen 20 mg to treat spasticity caused by brain and spinal cord damage. This eMedTV page lists the various forms of baclofen and explains which conditions the medication is used to treat. A link to more information is included.
  • Baclofen Drug Information
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, baclofen is a prescribed drug used to treat spasticity. This article offers a brief overview of important baclofen drug information, including general precautions and potential side effects of the medicine.
  • Baclofen Intrathecal Injection
    As this eMedTV page explains, baclofen intrathecal injection works to treat spasticity by directly pumping the medicine to the spinal cord. This page explains when a doctor may prescribe this form of baclofen and describes several benefits.
  • Baclofen Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, baclofen oral tablets may be prescribed to treat spasticity caused by several conditions related to brain or spinal cord damage. This page also describes how the medication works and lists possible side effects.
  • Baclofen Pump
    For people with severe spasticity, a baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen) pump may be used to administer the drug. This eMedTV resource explains how the pump can help people avoid potentially intolerable and dangerous side effects of oral baclofen tablets.
  • Baclofen Side Effects
    If you are taking baclofen, side effects may include drowsiness, dizziness, and nausea. This eMedTV Web segment lists other potential side effects seen with the medication, including serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Baclofen Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, baclofen tablets may be prescribed to treat spasticity caused by MS or a spinal cord injury. This page offers a brief overview of the drug, including how it works, potential side effects, and available strengths.
  • Baclofen Withdrawal
    Potentially dangerous complications can occur when a person stops taking baclofen (Lioresal, Gablofen). This eMedTV segment describes possible symptoms of baclofen withdrawal and explains what a doctor may recommend to minimize these symptoms.
  • Baclofen Withdrawl
    As this eMedTV page explains, stopping baclofen too quickly may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as organ failure or loss of life. A link to more information is also included. Baclofen withdrawl is a common misspelling of baclofen withdrawal.
  • Baclofin
    A doctor may prescribe baclofen to treat spasticity caused by MS, spinal cord injuries, or cerebral palsy. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at this medication, including how it works and side effects. Baclofin is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Baclophen
    If you have spasticity due to certain conditions, a doctor may prescribe baclofen. This eMedTV article offers a brief description of baclofen and explains what to tell your doctor before taking this medicine. Baclophen is a common misspelling of baclofen.
  • Bacteria That Causes the Bubonic Plague
    Yersinia pestis is the bacteria that causes the bubonic plague. This section of the eMedTV library explains how this bacteria is transmitted, as well as common symptoms of infection, such as weakness, headaches, and swollen lymph glands.
  • Bacteria Vaginosis
    Bacterial vaginosis results from too many harmful bacteria in the vagina. This page of the eMedTV website links to an article on this condition, including causes and symptoms. Bacteria vaginosis is a common misspelling of bacterial vaginosis.
  • Bacterial Arthritis
    Also known as bacterial arthritis, septic arthritis is a condition that is considered a medical emergency. This eMedTV selection gives a brief description of this type of arthritis, with details on symptoms, treatment, and more.
  • Bacterial Meningitis
    A serious condition that may result in brain damage, bacterial meningitis is considered a medical emergency. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at bacterial meningitis and its causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention.
  • Bacterial Pink Eye
    There are three types of conjunctivitis (pink eye): bacterial, viral, and allergic. This eMedTV resource explores the causes of bacterial conjunctivitis, lists common symptoms, and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Bacterial Pneumonia
    Bacterial pneumonia occurs when certain types of bacteria overwhelm the lungs' defense systems. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth overview of this condition, explaining how it is spread, who is affected by it, how the illness is treated, and more.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis
    BV (bacterial vaginosis) occurs when harmful bacteria disrupt the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina. This eMedTV resource tells you what you need to know about BV, including symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis and Pregnancy
    Women of childbearing years need to be aware of the threat bacterial vaginosis poses during pregnancy. This eMedTV article examines this topic in more detail and includes a link to more information about bacterial vaginosis.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Cause
    Too much of the bacteria normally present in the vagina is the primary cause of bacterial vaginosis. This eMedTV resource talks more about possible causes and provides information on risk factors for the condition, such as douching.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Information
    Are you looking for information on bacterial vaginosis? This eMedTV selection presents a brief overview of this condition, taking a look at possible symptoms, the usual course of treatment, and one of the key ways women can prevent infection.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Symptom
    Common signs and symptoms of bacterial vaginosis include foul-smelling discharge and pain during urination. This eMedTV Web page provides in-depth information on the most common bacterial vaginosis symptom and also lists potential complications.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Symptoms
    Common bacterial vaginosis signs and symptoms discussed in this eMedTV resource include abnormal discharge that is fishy-smelling, vaginal itching, and vaginal irritation. The risk during pregnancy that the disease presents is also discussed.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Treatment
    Two different drugs are used as part of bacterial vaginosis treatment, which this eMedTV page describes. This page also discusses why treatment is not always needed, but stresses that doctors often routinely recommend it to prevent certain complications.
  • Bacterim
    Bactrim is a prescription drug used to treat a wide variety of infections. This eMedTV page describes how Bactrim works, lists potential side effects of the drug, and explains what strengths are available. Bacterim is a common misspelling of Bactrim.
  • Bactriban
    Several different bacterial infections, from impetigo to MRSA, can be treated with Bactroban. This eMedTV page provides a brief look at what this drug is used for, when it is used, and the different forms. Bactriban is a common misspelling of Bactroban.
  • Bactrim
    Bactrim is an antibiotic often prescribed to treat a wide variety of bacterial infections. This article on the eMedTV site describes how Bactrim works, explains when and how to take the drug, and lists potential side effects of the medication.
  • Bactrim 160/800 mg Tablets
    Your doctor may prescribe 160/800 mg Bactrim tablets to treat a variety of infections. This eMedTV Web segment discusses some general Bactrim dosing guidelines for treating conditions such as bladder infections or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.
  • Bactrim 80/400 mg Tablets
    If you have certain infections, your doctor may prescribe 80/400 mg Bactrim tablets. This eMedTV Web resource takes a look at some general Bactrim dosing guidelines, including a list of tips for when and how to effectively use this medication.
  • Bactrim and Diarrhea
    This eMedTV page explains that Bactrim has many possible side effects, including diarrhea that is watery or bloody. This article takes a closer look at when it may be time to call your doctor if you experience diarrhea while taking Bactrim.
  • Bactrim and Pregnancy
    It is generally recommended to avoid taking Bactrim during pregnancy. As this eMedTV article explains, animal studies on Bactrim and pregnancy show that the drug increases the risk of cleft palate. The drug may also cause jaundice and kernicterus.
  • Bactrim Antibiotic Medicine
    This eMedTV page takes a look at important information on Bactrim, an antibiotic used for preventing and treating certain infections (such as an ear infection or UTI). This page also covers general safety precautions and side effects of Bactrim.
  • Bactrim Dosage
    The recommended Bactrim dosage for most infections is one or two tablets every 12 hours. This eMedTV Web page lists Bactrim dosing guidelines for specific types of infections and explains how dosing is determined for children.
  • Bactrim Drug Interactions
    Many medications can cause Bactrim drug interactions, including digoxin, warfarin, and phenytoin. This eMedTV segment contains a list of other drugs that may interact with Bactrim and describes the potential effects of these interactions.
  • Bactrim DS
    Bactrim DS is an antibiotic that is often prescribed to treat certain types of infections. This eMedTV resource explains how this medication works and offers a more in-depth look at dosing information, potential side effects, and general precautions.
  • Bactrim for Urinary Tract Infections (UTI)
    If you have a urinary tract infection (UTI), Bactrim may help treat it. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at Bactrim, including information on how it works and when a healthcare provider may prescribe it.
  • Bactrim Medicine Information
    This eMedTV page takes a look at important information on Bactrim, a medicine used for treating or preventing certain infections, such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. This page also explains how this drug works and lists possible side effects.
  • Bactrim Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral Bactrim tablets may be prescribed to treat a variety of different infections. This article also describes how Bactrim works, lists possible side effects, and outlines the available strengths of the medication.
  • Bactrim Pills
    Available as a pill, Bactrim is a medication used to treat and prevent a variety of different infections. This eMedTV page offers more detail on this prescription drug, including available strengths and potential side effects.
  • Bactrim Reactions
    Some of the potential reactions that may occur with Bactrim include nausea, vomiting, and rashes. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible reactions, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Bactrim Side Effects
    Common Bactrim side effects include loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. This page from the eMedTV site provides a list of other possible side effects, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Bactrim Tablets
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Bactrim may be prescribed to treat various infections and prevent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. This page also explains how the tablets work, describes potential side effects of Bactrim, and lists available strengths.
  • Bactrim vs. Bactrim DS
    This eMedTV page explores Bactrim DS vs. Bactrim, explaining that the only difference between these two medications is that Bactrim DS contains exactly twice as much of the active ingredients as regular Bactrim. This page also lists available strengths.
  • Bactrin
    Bactrim is a prescription medicine used to treat certain bacterial infections. This eMedTV segment briefly describes how Bactrim works and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Bactrin is a common misspelling of Bactrim.
  • Bactroban
    Bactroban is an antibiotic that is especially effective against MRSA when used as a nasal ointment. This eMedTV selection provides an in-depth look at this prescription drug, with information on how to use it, possible side effects, dosing, and more.
  • Bactrum
    Bactrim is a prescription antibiotic licensed to treat various types of bacterial infections. This eMedTV page discusses Bactrim uses in more detail and offers general warnings and precautions for this drug. Bactrum is a common misspelling of Bactrim.
  • Bad Cholesterol
    Low density lipoprotein (a substance that transports cholesterol) is often called "bad cholesterol." As this eMedTV article explains, too much of this substance in the blood may lead to blocked arteries and increases the risk for heart disease.
  • Bad Side Effects From Cipro
    Some of the potentially bad side effects from Cipro may include watery diarrhea and hallucinations. This eMedTV segment describes other possible problems that may occur while taking this medication and discusses which reactions require medical care.
  • Bad Side Effects of Lipitor
    Some people may have bad Lipitor side effects, such as unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness. This eMedTV Web resource offers an overview of other negative side effects of Lipitor, including some of the most commonly reported side effects.
  • Balemia
    Bulimia is an eating disorder with roots in psychological problems. This eMedTV page explains how a person with bulimia will binge and then purge the food from the body using laxatives, pills, or vomiting. Balemia is a common misspelling of bulimia.
  • Balimia
    As this eMedTV page explains, a person with bulimia eats a lot of food in a short amount of time and then purges the food from the body. This page covers causes and treatment options for this eating disorder. Balimia is a common misspelling of bulimia.
  • Balmex
    Balmex is a line of over-the-counter (OTC) diaper rash products used to both treat and prevent rashes. This eMedTV resource describes the various products in this line, explains how they work, and provides information on how to use them.
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