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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Zithromax - Zovirax and Pregnancy

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Zithromax to Zovirax and Pregnancy. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Zithromax (Azithromycin)
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Zithromax (azithromycin) is approved for the treatment of gonorrhea and many other bacterial infections. This article gives an overview of this drug, with details on specific uses and factors that will affect your dose.
  • Zithromax and Pregnancy
    If become pregnant while taking Zithromax, tell your doctor. This eMedTV Web page explains why this drug is listed as a pregnancy Category B medicine and describes situations in which it may be recommend to a pregnant woman.
  • Zithromax Dosage
    As this eMedTV article explains, for treating most types of infections, the Zithromax dosage is 250 mg or 500 mg once daily for three to five days. This page also discusses dosing guidelines for children and for treating sexually transmitted diseases.
  • Zithromax Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains how drug interactions with Zithromax can change how your body metabolizes the drugs and alter the levels of some drugs in your blood. Nelfinavir and carbamazepine are among the drugs that can potentially interfere with Zithromax.
  • Zithromax Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, Zithromax uses include treating bacterial infections (such as ear and sinus infections) and sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea and chlamydia. Among the drug's off-label uses are treating acne and whooping cough.
  • Zitia
    This eMedTV page outlines Zetia, a prescription drug that treats high cholesterol. This page covers specific uses, effects, dosing, and the importance of using the medicine in conjunction with lifestyle changes. Zitia is a common misspelling of Zetia.
  • Zitromax
    Zithromax is a medicine that is commonly used for the treatment of bacterial infections. As this eMedTV segment explains, the antibiotic is also used for treating certain sexually transmitted diseases. Zitromax is a common misspelling of Zithromax.
  • Zivox
    If you have a serious bacterial infection, your doctor may recommend Zyvox. This eMedTV page explains the conditions this antibiotic can treat (and can't treat), and links to more detailed information on it. Zivox is a common misspelling of Zyvox.
  • Zocor
    Zocor is often used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides, and to prevent cardiovascular disease. This eMedTV Web page discusses this prescription medication in detail, including side effects, dosing, strengths, and how it works.
  • Zocor and Joint Pain
    This eMedTV page lists some short-term pain-relief suggestions that you can try if you're taking Zocor and joint pain occurs. Among other things, you can take over-the-counter drugs like aspirin or Tylenol or apply heat or cold to the sore area.
  • Zocor and Liver Problems
    It's up for debate as to whether liver problems and Zocor are related. This eMedTV page lists some liver problems seen rarely in people taking this drug (like cirrhosis and hepatoma) and possible symptoms of liver problems (like nausea or vomiting).
  • Zocor and Memory Loss
    Memory loss occurs in less than 1 percent of people taking Zocor. This part of the eMedTV archives discusses research studies on this particular topic and also advises talking with your doctor if you notice any memory problems while taking the drug.
  • Zocor and Muscle Aches
    This eMedTV page warns that if you're taking Zocor and muscle aches occur (especially when you have a fever or feel ill), it could signify a serious muscle problem like myopathy or rhabdomyolysis. Call your doctor right away if you have these symptoms.
  • Zocor and Muscle Pain
    If you're taking Zocor and muscle pain occurs, contact your doctor. This eMedTV page warns that muscle tenderness or weakness along with fever or a feeling of sickness can signify a serious muscle problem in some people taking Zocor (simvastatin).
  • Zocor and Weight Gain
    As this eMedTV page explains, gaining weight is a side effect of some cholesterol drugs, but not with Zocor. This page lists things that you can do if you notice any weight gain, such as exercising and eating a low-cholesterol diet.
  • Zocor Dosage
    The starting dose of Zocor for most people with high cholesterol is 20 mg to 40 mg once daily. This eMedTV segment also lists the starting dosage for children (10 mg once daily), as well as tips on dosing (like always taking Zocor as prescribed).
  • Zocor Drug Interactions
    Fibrates, antifungals, warfarin, and other drugs can all cause problems when taken with Zocor. This eMedTV page describes how drug interactions with Zocor can alter how your body metabolizes the drugs and change the blood levels of some medications.
  • Zocor Medicine
    As this article from the eMedTV site explains, Zocor is often used to lower cholesterol and prevent cardiovascular disease This Web page gives a brief overview of this medicine and includes a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Zocor Side Effect -- Depression
    Many people ask, "Is a Zocor side effect depression?" This eMedTV article explains that depression is a side effect reported rarely with Zocor. This page also lists some depression symptoms such as feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and helplessness.
  • Zocor Side Effects
    This eMedTV page lists common side effects of Zocor, such as nausea and gas; rare side effects, such as hepatitis; and symptoms that may require medical attention, such as muscle tenderness or weakness along with fever or a feeling of sickness.
  • Zofirlucast
    Zafirlukast is a prescription drug used to prevent asthma attacks in adults and children. This eMedTV page describes the medicine in more detail and explains how it works to reduce asthma symptoms. Zofirlucast is a common misspelling of zafirlukast.
  • Zofram
    This eMedTV article explains how Zofran works to prevent nausea and vomiting in people who are undergoing chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. This page also explains potential side effects. Zofram is a common misspelling of Zofran.
  • Zofran
    Zofran is a drug that is used to prevent nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy and other causes. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this drug, including information on potential side effects and general dosing guidelines.
  • Zofran 4 mg Tablets
    There are several strengths available for Zofran tablets; 4 mg is the lowest available strength. This eMedTV Web page explains what other forms and strengths are available and offers information on how Zofran dosing works.
  • Zofran 8 mg Tablets
    The usual dose for preventing postoperative nausea is two 8 mg Zofran tablets taken an hour before surgery. This eMedTV article also offers Zofran dosing guidelines for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced and radiation-induced nausea and vomiting.
  • Zofran and Constipation
    Constipation can be a Zofran side effect for those undergoing chemotherapy or radiation, as this eMedTV page explains. However, it doesn't appear to be a problem for people who take the drug before surgery. This page discusses studies on this topic.
  • Zofran Dosage for Children
    The recommended dosage of Zofran for children varies, depending on the child's age. As this eMedTV page explains, children ages 12 and up follow dosing guidelines for adults. For children ages 4 through 11, the Zofran dose is 4 mg three times daily.
  • Zofran During Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article talks about pregnancy and Zofran, explaining that it is considered generally safe to take the product if you are expecting. This page also discusses how the FDA categorizes the drug as a pregnancy Category B medication.
  • Zofran for Morning Sickness
    Occasionally, doctors may treat morning sickness with the prescription drug Zofran. As this page from the eMedTV library explains, Zofran can be used "off-label" to treat and prevent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.
  • Zofran for Nausea
    As this eMedTV segment explains, you may be able to prevent nausea and vomiting (due to chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery) by taking Zofran. This article offers information on how this medicine works for nausea and vomiting.
  • Zofran Generic
    There are several different strengths and forms of generic Zofran (ondansetron). This eMedTV segment describes these in detail; this article also lists a few of the companies who manufacture this generic drug.
  • Zofran in Children
    Zofran can be used in patients as young as four years old for chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. This eMedTV Web page further discusses the use of this drug in children and also provides Zofran dosing guidelines for children ages 4 to 12.
  • Zofran Injection
    Zofran is available in several forms, including tablets, orally-disintegrating tablets, and an injection. This eMedTV resource briefly explains when the injections are administered and describes how Zofran works for preventing nausea and vomiting.
  • Zofran ODT 4 mg Orally Disintegrating Tablets
    Children ages 4 to 11 typically start with 4 mg Zofran orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs). This eMedTV page offers information on when and how to take Zofran orally disintegrating tablets and lists the other forms and strengths available for this drug.
  • Zofran ODT 8 mg Orally Disintegrating Tablets
    The usual Zofran dose for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting is 16 mg one hour before surgery. As this eMedTV page explains, this can be taken as either two 8 mg Zofran ODTs (orally disintegrating tablets) or two regular tablets.
  • Zofran Side Effects
    Some side effects of Zofran can include fatigue, diarrhea, and dizziness. This portion of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at some of the common side effects, as well as several serious side effects to report to your doctor, such as chest pain.
  • Zofran Tablets
    There are four different forms of Zofran (tablets, orally-disintegrating tablets, solution, and injection). This eMedTV article describes this medication in more detail, discusses approved Zofran uses, and explores the effects of this product.
  • Zoladex
    Zoladex is prescribed for the treatment of prostate and breast cancer, as well as certain other conditions. This eMedTV page gives an overview of this drug, including details on how it works, potential side effects, how the implant is inserted, and more.
  • Zoladex 10.8 Mg
    This eMedTV article explains that your doctor will determine your Zoladex dosage based on the condition being treated. For example, the 10.8-mg Zoladex implant is used to treat advanced prostate cancer. This page also links to more details on this topic.
  • Zoladex Administration
    This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at the administration of Zoladex, a type of implant used to treat late-stage breast or prostate cancer. This article explains how your doctor will insert this implant and provides a link to more information.
  • Zoladex and Bone Loss
    Using Zoladex implants may increase your risk for bone problems, such as osteoporosis. This eMedTV segment discusses how bone loss may occur with Zoladex use and why this drug may not be safe for some people. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Zoladex for Prostate Cancer
    This eMedTV Web selection explains how using Zoladex for prostate cancer can help slow down the growth of cancer cells. This page further discusses what this drug is used for and how it works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Zoladex Implant
    A doctor may prescribe a Zoladex implant to treat advanced prostate or breast cancer. This page of the eMedTV Web library explores how this implant is inserted and how the medicine works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Zoladex Injection
    Your doctor will insert the Zoladex implant via an injection just under the skin of the abdomen. This eMedTV Web page explores more details on how this implant is given and what to expect during treatment. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Zoladex Product Information
    Zoladex is available by prescription and is used for treating breast cancer and prostate cancer. This eMedTV Web selection offers more information on Zoladex, including specific uses of this product, side effects, and general safety precautions.
  • Zoladex Side Effects
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Zoladex can cause several reactions, including headaches, sweating, and diarrhea. This page provides a detailed outline of potential Zoladex side effects, with statistics on how often these problems occur.
  • Zolaft
    Zoloft is a drug often prescribed to treat depression, panic disorder, and other conditions. This eMedTV page lists other uses for the drug and describes some of the side effects that may occur with Zoloft. Zolaft is a common misspelling of Zoloft.
  • Zolair
    A doctor can prescribe Xolair to prevent allergic asthma attacks or treat chronic hives. This eMedTV resource describes potential side effects and explains what to tell your doctor prior to using the medicine. Zolair is a common misspelling of Xolair.
  • Zoledex
    Zoladex is a medicine used for the treatment of advanced breast and prostate cancer. This eMedTV article explains how this medicine works, covers some dosing information, and lists possible side effects. Zoledex is a common misspelling of Zoladex.
  • Zoledronic Acid
    Zoledronic acid is used to treat osteoporosis, high blood calcium due to cancer, and other conditions. This eMedTV page further explores approved uses, describes the effects of the medicine, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Zolendronic Acid
    Zoledronic acid is a drug that is licensed to treat high blood calcium due to cancer and Paget's disease. This eMedTV page discusses other uses of the medicine and links to more information. Zolendronic acid is a common misspelling of zoledronic acid.
  • Zolfot
    Zoloft is a prescription drug used for treating depression and other conditions within the brain. This eMedTV segment discusses Zoloft uses in more detail and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Zolfot is a common misspelling of Zoloft.
  • Zolft
    Zoloft is a medicine used for treating panic disorder, depression, and other conditions. This eMedTV article covers other Zoloft uses, explains how the drug works, and lists some of its possible side effects. Zolft is a common misspelling of Zoloft.
  • Zolidex
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, Zoladex implants can help relieve symptoms of breast cancer, prostate cancer, and various other conditions by decreasing certain hormone levels. Zolidex is a common misspelling of Zoladex.
  • Zolinza
    Zolinza is a drug licensed to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma when the cancer has gotten worse or returned. This eMedTV article presents more details on this medicine, with information on when it is prescribed, how it is taken, and possible side effects.
  • Zolinza Medication Information
    Zolinza is a drug prescribed to treat cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in adults. This eMedTV page contains information on Zolinza, including how this chemotherapy medication is taken and who may not be able to use it. A link to more details is also included.
  • Zolipidem
    Adults with insomnia can ask their doctors about the prescription sleep medicine zolpidem. This eMedTV article offers general warnings and precautions for this drug and lists side effects that may occur. Zolipidem is a common misspelling of zolpidem.
  • Zollar
    Xolair is used for treating allergic asthma as well as chronic hives. This page on the eMedTV Web site briefly explains how this drug is given and offers a more in-depth look at its uses and effects. Zollar is a common misspelling of Xolair.
  • Zolloft
    Zoloft is a medicine that is licensed to treat depression and other conditions. This eMedTV resource briefly defines Zoloft and provides a link to more in-depth information. Zolloft is a common misspelling of Zoloft.
  • Zolmitriptan
    Zolmitriptan can be used to treat migraine headaches once they start. This portion of the eMedTV archives highlights how this prescription drug works, as well as its potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and available strengths.
  • Zolodex
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Zoladex is used in the treatment of breast cancer, prostate cancer, and certain other conditions. This page describes how the drug works and lists potential side effects. Zolodex is a common misspelling of Zoladex.
  • Zoloft
    Zoloft is a medication that is licensed to treat depression, panic disorder, and other conditions. This eMedTV article provides an overview of this drug, including information about how it works, how to take it, and possible side effects.
  • Zoloft 100 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for the tablet form of Zoloft, 100 mg tablets are the highest strength. This eMedTV resource provides guidelines when using Zoloft to treat various conditions, including depression, panic disorder, and PMDD.
  • Zoloft 25 mg Tablets
    Adults with panic disorder typically start with Zoloft 25 mg tablets (one tablet, once a day). This eMedTV page also offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of depression, OCD, post-traumatic stress disorder, social anxiety disorder, and PMDD.
  • Zoloft 50 mg Tablets
    People with depression or OCD generally start with Zoloft 50 mg tablets (one tablet, once a day). This eMedTV page also provides dosing guidelines for treating panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, PMDD, and social anxiety disorder with Zoloft.
  • Zoloft Alternatives
    Alternatives to Zoloft that may be used for treating depression can include Prozac, Paxil, and other SSRIs. This eMedTV article describes other possible Zoloft alternatives, such as other antidepressants, therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy.
  • Zoloft and Breastfeeding
    Studies of Zoloft show that the drug seems to pass through breast milk, but at very low levels. This eMedTV page discusses research on breastfeeding and Zoloft, and explains why many doctors think that it's often okay to nurse while on the drug.
  • Zoloft and Burning Sensation
    Some people experience a burning sensation (paresthesia) while on Zoloft. This eMedTV Web page discusses Zoloft and burning sensation, and explains how this usually painless sensation most commonly occurs in the hands, feet, arms, or legs.
  • Zoloft and Dry Mouth
    Zoloft and dry mouth are related -- dry mouth is a common side effect of Zoloft. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses how common dry mouth is among people who take Zoloft and offers a list of tips that may help alleviate dry mouth.
  • Zoloft and Hair Loss
    Although people taking Zoloft may experience hair loss, it is an infrequent side effect of the medication. This eMedTV segment discusses Zoloft and hair loss, including information about the prevalence of this problem among people taking the drug.
  • Zoloft and Insomnia
    There can be a link between Zoloft and insomnia -- difficulty sleeping is a common side effect of Zoloft. This eMedTV article discusses Zoloft and insomnia, and provides suggestions for improving sleep, such as maintaining a regular sleep-wake cycle.
  • Zoloft and Migraines
    Migraines appear to be a side effect of Zoloft; however, as this eMedTV segment explains, the drug may help prevent them, too. This page discusses Zoloft and migraines, including the results of clinical studies and what you can do if they occur.
  • Zoloft and Pregnancy
    Taking Zoloft during pregnancy can affect the unborn child, especially in the third trimester. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses Zoloft and pregnancy, and explains some of the risks associated with taking the drug while pregnant.
  • Zoloft and Seizures
    Seizures occur infrequently in people taking Zoloft. This eMedTV resource discusses Zoloft and seizures, including information about who is most at risk to experience seizures while on the medication.
  • Zoloft and Sex Drive
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are several possible sexual side effects of Zoloft, including impotence and a decreased sex drive. Zoloft may or may not cause these, however, so it's important to talk to your doctor if you have any of these problems.
  • In-depth Information on Zoloft and Suicide
    Children and teenagers taking Zoloft may be at a slightly increased risk of having suicidal thoughts. This eMedTV article summarizes some research that has been conducted on suicide and Zoloft, and discusses the FDA's warning on this topic.
  • Zoloft and Weight Gain
    There are several possible side effects of taking Zoloft, and weight gain is one of them. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses unexplained weight gain with Zoloft, and covers things you can do to avoid gaining weight.
  • Zoloft and Weight Loss
    While many people lose a pound or two while on Zoloft, others lose too much weight when taking the drug. This eMedTV resource discusses Zoloft and weight loss, and explains how people usually lose a few pounds when they first start taking the drug.
  • Zoloft Antidepressant
    As a type of antidepressant, Zoloft treats conditions such as depression by affecting a brain chemical. This eMedTV Web segment further discusses Zoloft, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zoloft Dangers
    As an antidepressant, Zoloft may cause suicidal thoughts and behavior in adults and children. This eMedTV segment discusses other potential dangers with Zoloft, including uncommon but potentially serious side effects that require medical attention.
  • Zoloft Dosage
    The typical Zoloft dose for adults with depression or OCD is 50 mg once daily. This eMedTV segment explores common Zoloft dosages for a variety of conditions, such as panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and social anxiety disorder.
  • Zoloft Drug Information
    Zoloft is a prescribed medication commonly used to treat conditions such as depression and OCD. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of Zoloft drug information, including general precautions and a link to more in-depth information.
  • Zoloft Drug Interactions
    Lithium, aspirin, and other medications can cause drug interactions with Zoloft. This eMedTV resource describes the potentially negative reactions that can occur, including some that may cause serotonin syndrome, which can be dangerous.
  • Zoloft for Depression
    Most people use Zoloft for depression, but the drug is also approved for treating several other conditions. This eMedTV Web page explores other approved uses and offers information on how the antidepressant works, with a link to detailed information.
  • Zoloft for Panic Disorder
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, Zoloft is a medication used to treat conditions affecting the brain, such as panic disorder. This page discusses using Zoloft for panic disorder, including information on how the drug works.
  • Zoloft for Premature Ejaculation
    Although Zoloft is not approved for this use, premature ejaculation may be treated with the drug. This eMedTV article explains how a side effect of Zoloft may actually help men who experience problems with premature ejaculation.
  • Zoloft for PTSD
    Zoloft is a medicine used to treat several conditions, including PTSD. Zoloft, as this eMedTV Web segment explains, works by affecting a certain chemical in the brain (serotonin) that can cause conditions such as PTSD when the levels are unbalanced.
  • Zoloft Indications
    Zoloft is an antidepressant medication used to treat conditions such as depression, panic disorder, and OCD. This eMedTV segment takes a closer look at Zoloft indications, including several benefits and information on how the drug works.
  • Zoloft Medication
    Zoloft is an antidepressant used to treat a number of conditions. This eMedTV Web resource gives a brief overview of Zoloft, listing some approved uses of the medication, available forms, and some of the factors that will affect your dose.
  • Zoloft Medicine for OCD
    Doctors can prescribe the medicine Zoloft for OCD in both adults and children. This article from the eMedTV archives explains what other conditions can be treated with Zoloft and explains how the medication works for these uses.
  • Zoloft Oral
    Zoloft is a prescription medicine used for treating depression, panic disorder, and other conditions. This eMedTV page covers other approved uses and explains how the drug works. There are currently two forms of Zoloft: oral concentrate and tablets.
  • Zoloft Overdose
    Overdosing on Zoloft may lead to vomiting, fainting, increased heart rate, and more serious symptoms. This eMedTV Web page discusses other symptoms of a Zoloft overdose and treatment options for a person who has overdosed on the drug.
  • Zoloft Risks
    Before you take Zoloft, risks associated with antidepressant use should be reviewed with your doctor. As this eMedTV page explains, antidepressants can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior, as well as other potentially serious problems.
  • Zoloft Sexual Side Effects
    Ejaculation failure, impotence, and decreased sex drive are possible sexual side effects seen with Zoloft. This eMedTV Web page provides an in-depth discussion on these and other problems that may occur and provides information about their prevalence.
  • Zoloft Side Effects
    For people taking Zoloft, side effects may include such things as nausea, insomnia, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at side effects of this drug, including details about rare but serious problems that may occur.
  • Zoloft Side Iffects
    Some common side effects of Zoloft include insomnia, diarrhea, and nausea. This eMedTV Web page also takes a brief look at side effects that may require prompt medical care. Zoloft side iffects is a common misspelling of Zoloft side effects.
  • Zoloft Substitute
    You may want to consider a Zoloft substitute if you develop any bothersome side effects with this drug. As this eMedTV page explains, alternatives may include other medications, psychotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, and natural therapies.
  • Zoloft Tablets
    Zoloft is a prescription drug used to treat depression and various other conditions. This page on the eMedTV site offers more information on what the antidepressant is used for and explains how it works. Zoloft comes as tablets and in a liquid form.
  • Zoloft Weight Change
    There are several possible side effects of Zoloft, and weight change is one of them. This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how weight loss is a common side effect of the medication. Zoloft can also cause weight gain in some people as well.
  • Zoloft Withdrawal
    People who stop taking Zoloft too abruptly may experience withdrawal symptoms, such as anxiety. This eMedTV segment identifies symptoms of Zoloft withdrawal and explains the importance of being gradually weaned off the medication.
  • Zoloft Withdrawl
    Stopping Zoloft too quickly may lead to symptoms such as confusion and a burning sensation. This eMedTV article describes other possible withdrawal symptoms and how to prevent them. Zoloft withdrawl is a common misspelling of Zoloft withdrawal.
  • Zoloft Xanax Drug Interactions
    Xanax could potentially interact with antidepressants, such as Zoloft. Drug interactions with Xanax, as this eMedTV page explains, can increase your risk of developing side effects (such as difficulty breathing, memory loss, confusion, or drowsiness).
  • Zolpidem
    Zolpidem is a drug that is prescribed for the treatment of short-term insomnia. This selection from the eMedTV archives contains other important information on zolpidem and its uses, effects, and potential side effects.
  • Zolpidem Oral Spray
    Zolpidem oral spray is a prescription drug approved to treat insomnia in people with trouble falling asleep. This eMedTV article explains how to use this product, describes how it works, and lists potential side effects.
  • Zolpidem Tartrate
    If you have trouble sleeping, your healthcare provider may recommend taking zolpidem tartrate. This eMedTV selection briefly describes this medication, with information on how it is taken and why the drug may not be suitable in all cases.
  • Zolpiden
    Zolpidem is a prescription sleep medication approved for use in adults only. This eMedTV page describes the effects of zolpidem and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Zolpiden is a common misspelling of zolpidem.
  • Zolpidiem
    Zolpidem is a prescription medicine licensed to treat insomnia. This eMedTV segment covers when and how to take zolpidem and explains what your doctor should be aware of before prescribing you this drug. Zolpidiem is a common misspelling of zolpidem.
  • Zolpidum
    The prescription medication zolpidem is used for treating short-term insomnia in adults. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of zolpidem and provides general dosing guidelines for the drug. Zolpidum is a common misspelling of zolpidem.
  • Zolpimist
    Zolpimist is a drug approved for the short-term treatment of insomnia. As this eMedTV page explains, the medicine comes in the form of an oral spray. This article outlines the effects of the medicine, describes how it works, and offers dosing guidelines.
  • Zomeg
    This eMedTV page covers the prescription drug Zomig, which is used to treat migraines. This page discusses how Zomig works, its possible side effects, and the different forms of the drug that are available. Zomeg is a common misspelling of Zomig.
  • Zometa
    Zometa is a medicine used to treat high blood calcium due to cancer. This page from the eMedTV Web site further discusses what Zometa is used for, describes how the drug works, and explains when and how the medicine should be administered.
  • Zometa Drug Information
    This page of the eMedTV site provides some basic information on Zometa, a drug used to treat bone- and calcium-related changes due to cancer. This segment explains how the medication is administered and what to discuss with your doctor prior to treatment.
  • Zometa Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported side effects of Zometa include vomiting, fever, and anemia. This eMedTV Web page offers a more complete list of possible Zometa side effects, including serious side effects that should be reported to your doctor.
  • Zomig
    Zomig is a prescription medicine approved to treat migraine headaches as they occur. This eMedTV article describes how Zomig works to relieve migraine symptoms, lists its potential side effects, and gives tips on when and how to take the medicine.
  • Zomig Side Effects
    This section of the eMedTV library discusses some common Zomig side effects, such as drowsiness, weakness, and neck pain. This article also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious and rare problems with this drug.
  • Zonagram
    Available by prescription, Zonegran is a medication that is used to control partial seizures. This eMedTV segment offers a brief description of the drug, with information on its effects in the brain. Zonagram is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonagran
    Zonegran is a drug that is used to control a specific type of seizure. This page of the eMedTV Web site briefly describes the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Zonagran is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonegram
    Used to control partial seizures, Zonegran is a drug that is generally taken once or twice a day. This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of the medication and provides a link to more information. Zonegram is a common misspelling of Zonegran.
  • Zonegran
    Zonegran is a prescription medicine that is used to control partial seizures. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers an in-depth look at the drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zonegran and Weight Loss
    Weight loss is a common side effect of Zonegran. This eMedTV selection offers a discussion on this side effect, with statistics on how frequently weight loss occurs and what to do if you notice this problem during treatment.
  • Zonegran Side Effects
    Common side effects of Zonegran include headaches, nausea, and drowsiness, among others. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of common and uncommon side effects of this drug, including the ones requiring immediate medical attention.
  • Zonisamide
    Zonisamide is a prescription drug commonly used for the treatment of partial seizures. This eMedTV selection provides an overview of this drug, with detailed information on its effects, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zopanex
    Xopenex is typically prescribed to treat asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This eMedTV resource explores some potential side effects of the drug and briefly explains how it works. Zopanex is a common misspelling of Xopenex.
  • Zopenex
    This page on the eMedTV Web site gives an overview of Xopenex, a drug used to treat respiratory problems. This page describes how the medication works, how to take it, and what to do if you overdose. Zopenex is a common misspelling of Xopenex.
  • Zopinex
    Xopenex is a prescription drug used to treat certain respiratory problems. This eMedTV article explains the conditions the drug can treat and also describes some factors that will affect your dosage. Zopinex is a common misspelling of Xopenex.
  • Zorivax
    This eMedTV article discusses Zovirax, a drug that is used to treat chickenpox, shingles, and genital herpes. This article offers a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Zorivax is a common misspelling of Zovirax.
  • Zortress
    Zortress is a drug licensed to prevent the body from rejecting a new kidney or liver after a transplant. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this prescription medicine, with detailed information on dosing, potential side effects, and more.
  • Zostavac
    Zostavax is a drug that is given as a single injection to help prevent shingles in people age 50 and older. This eMedTV segment explains how Zostavax works and describes the vaccine in more detail. Zostavac is a common misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zostavac for Shingles
    Zostavax is an injection that can be given to help prevent shingles in people over the age of 50. This eMedTV page describes this medicine and lists possible side effects. Zostavac for shingles is a common variation and misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zostavac Vaccine
    Zostavax is a shingles vaccine that is specifically approved for people age 50 and older. This eMedTV article briefly covers how Zostavax works and links to more detailed information. Zostavac vaccine is a common variation and misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zostavax
    Zostavax is a vaccine that can be given to help prevent shingles in people 50 years old and older. This eMedTV article describes how Zostavax works, lists possible side effects of the drug, and explains what you should know before getting the vaccine.
  • Zostavax -- Vaccine for Shingles
    This eMedTV selection presents a brief overview of Zostavax, which is a shingles vaccine. It explains how the medication works, how long it is effective, and how it is administered, with a link to learn more.
  • Zostavax Side Effects
    Common Zostavax side effects may include redness or swelling at the injection site, headaches, and fever. This eMedTV page lists other side effects that may occur, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Zostervax
    Many doctors will recommend Zostavax, a shingles vaccine, to people over 50 years old. This eMedTV Web page offers more information on Zostavax and its uses, effects, and potential side effects. Zostervax is a common misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zostivax
    Zostavax is used for preventing shingles in people over the age of 50. This eMedTV article briefly describes the vaccine, including side effects, and offers a link to more detailed information. Zostivax is a common misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zostovax
    Zostavax is a vaccine that is commonly used to prevent shingles in adults 50 years old and older. This eMedTV resource further describes Zostavax and lists possible side effects of the vaccine. Zostovax is a common misspelling of Zostavax.
  • Zoverax
    Zovirax is a medicine commonly prescribed to treat genital herpes, shingles, and chickenpox. This eMedTV Web page describes the various forms of Zovirax and explains how the drug works. Zoverax is a common misspelling of Zovirax.
  • Zovia
    Zovia is an oral contraceptive that is only available by prescription. This part of the eMedTV library provides a complete overview of Zovia, including detailed information on its uses, dosing guidelines, warnings, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zovirax
    Zovirax is a prescription medicine that is used to treat shingles, chickenpox, and genital herpes. This eMedTV article offers an overview of the drug, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Zovirax and Pregnancy
    Zovirax is generally considered safe for women to take when pregnant. This eMedTV article provides information on Zovirax and pregnancy, including an explanation of why the FDA classifies it as a pregnancy Category B medication.
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