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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Stomach Cancer Radiation Therapy - Substitute for Zantac

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Stomach Cancer Radiation Therapy to Substitute for Zantac. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Stomach Cancer Radiation Therapy
    A treatment for stomach cancer, radiation therapy uses x-rays or other radiation to kill cancer cells. This eMedTV Web page explains how radiation is used to treat stomach cancer and discusses side effects associated with this form of treatment.
  • Stomach Cancer Research
    In order to better understand and treat stomach cancer, research is being conducted all over the country. This eMedTV page discusses various research studies now under way, such as work being done on using biological therapy to treat the disease.
  • Stomach Cancer Risk Factors
    When it comes to stomach cancer, risk factors such as smoking increase one's chances of developing the disease. This eMedTV segment identifies other risk factors for stomach cancer, such as being male or having a family history of the disease.
  • Stomach Cancer Screening
    Stomach cancer screening involves testing people for the disease when they have no symptoms. This eMedTV article discusses tests that may be used in screening for this disease and identifies groups of people who might benefit from such screening.
  • Stomach Cancer Stage
    As this eMedTV article explains, the stages of stomach cancer include stages 0-IV and recurrent cancer. This resource offers detailed descriptions of each of these stages and explains how determining the stage of cancer can help when planning treatment.
  • Stomach Cancer Statistics
    Based on stomach cancer statistics, an estimated 22,280 Americans will be diagnosed with the cancer in 2006. This eMedTV resource offers statistics concerning stomach cancer, including survival rates, age-at-diagnosis figures, and prevalence rates.
  • Stomach Cancer Support
    For people with stomach cancer, support from a variety of sources can make coping with the disease easier. This eMedTV resource discusses support groups and other potential sources of help for those with stomach cancer.
  • Stomach Cancer Surgery
    Surgery is commonly used to treat stomach cancer. This section of the eMedTV library looks at the different types of stomach cancer surgeries and procedures used to treat the disease, including information about the recovery process.
  • Stomach Cancer Survival Rate
    The overall five-year relative stomach cancer survival rate for 1995-2001 was 23.2 percent. This eMedTV segment provides five-year survival rates for stomach cancer, including rates broken out by the stage of the cancer at diagnosis.
  • Stomach Cancer Symptoms
    For people with stomach cancer, symptoms may include indigestion, nausea, bloody stools, and stomach pain. This eMedTV article lists early signs and symptoms of the disease (such as heartburn), as well as advanced symptoms (such as jaundice).
  • Stomach Cancer Treatment
    Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy may all be used to treat stomach cancer. This eMedTV article covers many aspects of treatment in detail, including side effects, follow-up care, clinical trials, and the importance of good nutrition.
  • Stomach Cancer Treatment By Stage
    One of the factors doctors consider when planning treatment of stomach cancer is the stage of the disease. This eMedTV page breaks down options for stomach cancer treatment by stage of the disease for stages 0-IV and recurrent cases of the disease.
  • Stomach Cancer Treatments
    Radiation and chemotherapy are among the treatments used for stomach cancer. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at the other options for this type of cancer and includes a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Stomach Cancer Types
    As this eMedTV article explains, the most common form of stomach cancer is gastric adenocarcinoma. This Web page discusses the different types of stomach cancer, which also include lymphomas and sarcomas.
  • Stomach Canser
    As this eMedTV page explains, stomach cancer is a disease that occurs when cancerous cells first form in the stomach. This page also describes who may be at an increased risk for this disease. Stomach canser is a common misspelling of stomach cancer.
  • Stomach Flu
    The stomach flu is not really a flu at all (we'll explain). This eMedTV article talks more about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this "flu," and also provides information on how long a person stays contagious.
  • Stomach Flu and Who It Affects
    In studying the stomach flu and who it affects, doctors have found that anyone can get stomach flu. This eMedTV article provides more information on stomach flu, including which viruses tend to affect children more frequently than adults.
  • Stomach Flu Cures
    There are no proven stomach flu cures other than time. However, this eMedTV article offers suggestions on ways to manage the symptoms of the illness (such as drinking plenty of fluids and getting rest) and links to more information about stomach flu.
  • Stomach Flu Diagnosis
    A stomach flu diagnosis is made by conducting a physical exam and, in some cases, performing certain tests. This eMedTV article explains the steps involved in diagnosing stomach flu, which also may include reviewing the person's medical history.
  • Stomach Flu Duration
    In most cases of stomach flu, duration of the illness ranges from 1 to 10 days. This eMedTV resource explains how the type of virus responsible for the stomach flu (such as a rotavirus) may affect the duration of the illness.
  • Stomach Flu in Children Information
    If your child has stomach flu, it's important to avoid dehydration. This eMedTV article explains the risks for dehydration associated with the stomach flu and discusses how the illness is diagnosed and treated in children.
  • Stomach Flu Incubation Period
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the stomach flu incubation period can be anywhere from 4 hours to 2 days, depending on the virus causing it. This article discusses incubation periods for stomach flu caused by rotavirus and norovirus infections.
  • Stomach Flu Information
    Are you looking for information on stomach flu? This part of the eMedTV site gives a brief description of this topic, explaining how this intestinal infection is not actually caused by a flu virus. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Stomach Flu Prevention
    In most cases, stomach flu prevention involves minimizing your exposure to stomach flu viruses. This eMedTV article provides suggestions for preventing or reducing exposure to viruses that can cause stomach flu.
  • Stomach Flu Prognosis
    In most cases, the stomach flu prognosis is that the patient will experience symptoms for 1 to 10 days. As this eMedTV article points out, however, the prognosis may be worse for certain people who are at an increased risk for dehydration.
  • Stomach Flu Symptoms
    In cases of stomach flu, symptoms typically include diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. This eMedTV segment discusses these and other signs and symptoms of stomach flu, such as fever, chills, and body aches.
  • Stomach Flu Treatment
    For people with stomach flu, treatment consists of such things as keeping the body hydrated. This eMedTV article examines other treatment options that can help manage the symptoms of stomach flu while the body fights the infection.
  • Stomach Virus
    A "stomach virus" does not affect the stomach -- it affects the small intestine. This eMedTV article identifies the four types of viruses that may cause the "stomach flu," describes the symptoms they cause, and explains how they are treated.
  • Stomoch Cancer
    This eMedTV page explores stomach cancer, a disease that can cause blood in the stool and unexplained weight loss. This page also covers treatment options and offers a link to more information. Stomoch cancer is a common misspelling of stomach cancer.
  • Stop Binge Eating
    People don't often end binge eating on their own -- in most cases, treatment is needed. This page of the eMedTV library describes methods used to help people stop binge eating, including therapy, nutritional counseling, and medication.
  • Stop Diarrhea
    Over-the-counter drugs such as Pepto-Bismol may help stop diarrhea in many cases. However, as this eMedTV article explains, such medications will only prolong health problems in people whose diarrhea is caused by a bacterial infection or a parasite.
  • Stopping Advair
    Stopping Advair abruptly does not cause any problems for most people taking the medication. This eMedTV segment explains what to do if you do abruptly stop taking Advair and discusses when it can be dangerous to stop the medication too quickly.
  • Stopping Wellbutrin XL
    It is possible to experience withdrawal symptoms when stopping Wellbutrin XL. This eMedTV page explains that this is more likely when the drug is stopped suddenly, lists potential symptoms, and explains how a doctor can minimize the chances of withdrawal.
  • Stratara
    This eMedTV segment explores Strattera, a prescription drug used to treat ADHD. This page discusses how the medicine works, its potential side effects, and what to tell your doctor before you take it. Stratara is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Stratarra
    Strattera is a prescription medication used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This eMedTV Web page gives a general overview of Strattera and links to more information. Stratarra is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Stratera
    Strattera, a prescription medicine, is commonly used for the treatment of ADHD. This eMedTV article offers an overview of Strattera and its uses, possible side effects, and dosing information. Stratera is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Straterra
    In previous studies, children and teens with ADHD who took Strattera had significant behavior improvements. This eMedTV Web page discusses Strattera effects and potential side effects. Straterra is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Strattera
    Strattera is a nonstimulant medication that is licensed to treat ADHD in children, teenagers, and adults. This eMedTV page explains in more detail how Strattera works and offers information on its effects, potential side effects, and strengths.
  • Strattera 60 mg Capsules
    Strattera 60 mg capsules are among the seven strengths available for this medication. This eMedTV resource lists the other available strengths and offers general dosing guidelines for Strattera use in both children and adults.
  • Strattera and Concerta
    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is often treated with medication. This eMedTV page compares Strattera and Concerta, two of the commonly used medicines for ADHD. It explains some of the differences and links to more information on both.
  • Strattera and Weight Loss
    Weight loss is a common side effect of Strattera. This eMedTV page covers this topic in more detail, noting how commonly weight loss occurs in people taking this medicine and the problem that too much weight loss can pose for growing children.
  • Strattera Dosage
    The starting Strattera dose for adults (and children or teens weighing more than 154 pounds) is 40 mg daily. This eMedTV Web page also lists the Strattera dosage for children and teenagers weighing less than 154 pounds.
  • Strattera Drug Information
    If you are looking for information on the ADHD drug Strattera, this eMedTV segment is a great place to start. It explains who can take it, what to expect, and how to ensure the safest treatment possible. Also included is a link to learn more.
  • Strattera for ADHD
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Strattera is the first ADHD medication that is classified as a nonstimulant. This segment explains how this medicine works, how often it is taken, and includes a link to more information on this prescription drug.
  • Strattera Medication Information
    Strattera, a medicine used for the treatment of ADHD, is approved for use in both children and adults. This eMedTV article offers more Strattera medication information, including more details on the drug's uses, effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Strattera Oral
    Strattera oral capsules are often prescribed for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This eMedTV segment explores how Strattera may work, lists potential side effects of the drug, and explains how often this medicine is taken.
  • Strattera Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects can occur during treatment with Strattera. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes specific Strattera sexual side effects to look out for (such as a decreased sex drive), as well as the likelihood of developing these problems.
  • Strattera Side Effects
    Side effects may potentially occur during treatment with Strattera. This eMedTV segment lists some common Strattera side effects (such as nausea or drowsiness) and some side effects to report to your doctor (such as confusion or lightheadedness).
  • Strattera Withdrawal
    This eMedTV article explains that there is no need for your doctor to slowly decrease your Strattera dosage when you are stopping treatment with the drug. This is because symptoms of withdrawal from Strattera aren't generally a problem.
  • Stratterra
    Strattera is currently the only non-stimulant drug approved to treat ADHD. This eMedTV Web page describes Strattera in more detail, explains how it works, and links to more information about the drug. Stratterra is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Strength of Myfortic
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV site, two different strengths of Myfortic are available. This article lists these strengths and briefly describes what this drug is used for. A link for people who want to learn more is also provided.
  • Strengths Nicotine Gum Comes In
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, nicotine gum comes in 2-mg and 4-mg strengths. This article further discusses how to determine which strength to use and describes some general dosing guidelines. A link to more information is also included.
  • Strengths of Loestrin 24 Fe
    There is only one strength of Loestrin 24 Fe, but as this eMedTV page explains, women have two different options when it comes to taking this birth control pill for the first time. This page explains what they are and links to more information on dosing.
  • Strengths of Nitrolingual Pumpspray
    This eMedTV article explains that there is just one Nitrolingual Pumpspray strength; however, it is available in two different-sized bottles. This page also describes these different sizes and presents basic dosing guidelines for this angina medicine.
  • Strengths of Yaz
    There is only one strength of Yaz available. As this eMedTV article explains, the active Yaz tablets contain 3 mg of drospirenone and 0.02 mg of ethinyl estradiol; the inactive tablets do not contain active ingredients.
  • Strep Infection Throat
    This eMedTV Web article covers important information on strep, a throat infection caused by specific bacteria. This page outlines possible symptoms of this condition, describes potential treatment options, and explains when symptoms should improve.
  • Strep Thorat
    Strep throat can cause fever, white patches on the throat, and a sore throat. This eMedTV Web resource offers a brief description of this throat infection, including causes and treatment options. Strep thorat is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Strep Throat
    Strep throat is a type of bacterial infection that most often affects children between the ages of 5 and 15. This eMedTV Web article further explores this throat infection, including causes, possible symptoms, and treatment options.
  • Strep Throat (Sore Throat) Information
    This eMedTV Web article describes some of the signs of strep throat, such as fever, tender lymph glands, and a sudden sore throat. Information on strep throat treatment is also included, as well as details on what causes this throat infection.
  • Strep Throat Antibiotics
    Amoxicillin and penicillin are two antibiotics commonly used to treat strep throat. This eMedTV article further describes using antibiotics for strep throat treatment in adults and children. This page also lists some alternative treatment options.
  • Strep Throat Causes
    Strep throat is caused by specific bacteria called group A streptococcus. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at these bacteria, including the potentially serious illnesses that Streptococcus can cause, such as impetigo, scarlet fever, and pneumonia.
  • Strep Throat Complications
    As this eMedTV article describes, middle ear infections, sinusitis, and peritonsillar abscesses are some of the possible complications of strep throat. This resource also lists less common problems that may occur if this infection is left untreated.
  • Strep Throat Contact
    You can get strep throat through direct contact with infected fluids (such as nasal discharge or saliva). This eMedTV segment provides more information on how this throat infection is spread and who is at a greater risk of getting this condition.
  • Strep Throat Cure
    Antibiotics, such as penicillin, are used to cure strep throat. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers a brief overview of possible ways to treat this throat infection, and explains when a person is no longer contagious.
  • Strep Throat Definition
    Strep throat is a throat infection caused by a specific bacteria (group A streptococcus). This eMedTV article takes a brief look at the definition of strep throat, including information on possible symptoms and treatment options that are available.
  • Strep Throat Diagnosis
    A doctor may use a throat culture or a rapid strep test to diagnose strep throat. This eMedTV Web page explains how to determine if someone has this throat infection, including a list of factors that may indicate that a sore throat is a strep infection.
  • Strep Throat in Adults
    Up to 10 percent of sore throats in adults are diagnosed as strep throat. This eMedTV Web resource takes an in-depth look at how strep can affect adults, including causes, possible symptoms, and ways to prevent and treat this type of infection.
  • Strep Throat in Children
    Up to 30 percent of sore throats in children (between 5 and 15 years old) are diagnosed as strep throat. This eMedTV page further discusses how strep throat affects children, including possible symptoms and various treatment options that are available.
  • Strep Throat in Infants
    It is possible for infants to get strep throat, although it is less common. This eMedTV article provides an in-depth look at how to identify the symptoms of this infection in infants. This page also covers causes and various treatment options.
  • Strep Throat in Kids
    This eMedTV page explains that if your child is between 5 and 15 years old, he or she may have a higher risk of strep throat. Kids with this infection are generally treated with antibiotics (such as amoxicillin). This page also links to more information.
  • Strep Throat Information
    Strep throat is a type of bacterial throat infection that most commonly affects children. This eMedTV Web resource provides important information on strep throat, including what causes it, possible symptoms, and common treatment options.
  • Strep Throat Medicine
    Penicillin and amoxicillin are two of the most commonly used medicines for strep throat. This eMedTV page lists several types of antibiotics that can treat this throat infection. This page also covers which antibiotics are best for adults and children.
  • Strep Throat Risk Factors
    Age, spending time in crowded places, and certain times of the year can increase your risk of strep throat. This eMedTV segment describes some of the factors that may increase a person's chances of getting this type of throat infection.
  • Strep Throat Symptoms
    If you have strep throat, symptoms may include fever, white patches on the throat, and red tonsils. This eMedTV Web segment describes other signs of this throat infection and explains how long these symptoms typically last.
  • Strep Throat Symptoms in Children
    Because kids do not always have classic signs of strep throat, it may be difficult to diagnose. This eMedTV segment discusses possible symptoms of strep throat in children, such as decreased appetite, nasal congestion, and nasal discharge.
  • Strep Throat Transmission
    Coughing, sneezing, or touching a contaminated surface are some of the ways of spreading strep throat. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at how strep throat is transmitted and how long it takes before you begin to notice symptoms.
  • Strep Throat Treatment
    Antibiotics, such as penicillin and amoxicillin, are common treatments for strep throat. This page of the eMedTV archives describes what a healthcare provider may recommend when treating this throat infection, including possible home remedies.
  • Strep Throght
    Strep throat is caused by specific bacteria and most often affects children ages 5 to 15. This eMedTV article briefly describes this throat infection, with information on symptoms and treatment. Strep throght is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Strep Throt
    Fever, a sore throat that begins suddenly, and white patches on the tonsils are signs of strep throat. This eMedTV page further discusses this throat infection, including causes and treatment options. Strep throt is a common misspelling of strep throat.
  • Streptococcal Pharyngitis
    Also known as strep throat, streptococcal pharyngitis is a type of bacterial throat infection. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains what causes this infection, lists possible symptoms, and discusses treatment options that are available.
  • Streptozocin
    Streptozocin is approved to treat pancreatic islet cell cancer. More detailed information is covered in this eMedTV page, including discussions on how this chemotherapy drug works, when and how it is given, why it is not safe for some people, and more.
  • Streptozosin
    Streptozocin is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat pancreatic islet cell cancer. This eMedTV resource examines this drug, including what it is used for, how it is given, and how it works. Streptozosin is a common misspelling of streptozocin.
  • Stress and Heart Disease
    This eMedTV resource discusses the indirect (and possibly direct) links between heart disease and stress, including information about how stress can trigger a heart attack. It also offers tips for making healthy choices to cope with stress.
  • Stress and High Blood Pressure
    Studies on high blood pressure and stress, as this eMedTV Web page explains, show that long-term stress may affect blood pressure; however, the effects of short-term stress are limited. This requires a rethinking of popular myths about stress.
  • Stress and High Cholesterol
    Several studies on stress and high cholesterol indicate that long-term stress can raise blood cholesterol levels, albeit indirectly. This eMedTV segment explores the relationship between stress and high cholesterol and offers stress management tips.
  • Stress and Hypertension
    Hypertension is not the same as "nervous tension"; nor is there a definite link between the two. This page on the eMedTV Web site corrects this popular misconception and discusses the findings of research studies on stress and hypertension.
  • Stress-Related Migraines
    Learning how to better manage stress can be an integral part of preventing migraines. This eMedTV page explains various approaches to preventing and managing stress-related migraines, such as getting enough sleep and doing yoga or exercise.
  • Stretera
    This page on the eMedTV site highlights Strattera, the only nonstimulant drug licensed to treat ADHD. This page discusses the medicine's uses, effects, and available strengths. Stretera is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Strettera
    This eMedTV resource examines Strattera, a prescription drug used to treat ADHD in children, teenagers, and adults. This page explores how Strattera works and what to tell your doctor before taking it. Strettera is a common misspelling of Strattera.
  • Striant
    Available by prescription only, Striant is a drug used for the treatment of low testosterone. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this anabolic steroid, including how it works, when to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Strock
    As this eMedTV page explains, a stroke is an episode in which blood supply to the brain is interrupted or a blood vessel in the brain bursts. This article discusses strokes and their symptoms and treatment. Strock is a common misspelling of stroke.
  • Strok
    A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is interrupted or a blood vessel in the brain bursts. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of strokes, including information about their symptoms. Strok is a common misspelling of stroke.
  • Stroke
    A stroke is a sudden episode in which a blood vessel in the brain gets blocked or ruptures. This eMedTV article explains how a stroke may occur and provides an overview of the topic, including information about symptoms and treatment options.
  • Stroke Causes
    The most common stroke causes involve blood clots blocking the flow of blood to the brain. This eMedTV article describes these possible causes in detail, which can include an embolism, thrombosis, an aneurysm, head trauma, and a brain tumor.
  • Stroke Effects
    Common effects of a stroke may include paralysis and sensory problems (including pain). This eMedTV segment describes possible results of a stroke, which can also include problems with thinking, attention, learning, judgment, language, and memory.
  • Stroke Information
    Are you looking for information on strokes? This segment from the eMedTV Web archives takes a quick look at this topic, explaining common symptoms of a stroke, what to do if you think you are having one, and more.
  • Stroke Prevention
    As this eMedTV segment explains, stroke prevention may involve quitting smoking, losing weight, and controlling blood pressure. This resource also describes other prevention strategies, including blood-thinning medications and certain procedures.
  • Stroke Recovery
    Rehab is an important part of stroke recovery, helping people relearn skills lost due to brain damage. This eMedTV article discusses steps involved in recovering from a stroke, which may include making lifestyle changes to help prevent future strokes.
  • Stroke Rehab
    Ongoing treatment following a stroke mainly involves physical therapy; however, as this eMedTV segment explains, rehab for a stroke may also include occupational therapy, speech-language therapy, and talk therapy.
  • Stroke Rehabilitation
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, stroke rehabilitation helps stroke survivors relearn skills that are lost when part of the brain is damaged. This article takes an in-depth look at the different parts of the rehabilitation process.
  • Stroke Risk Factors
    Smoking, high blood pressure, and diabetes can all increase your chances of having a stroke. This eMedTV page discusses these and other risk factors for stroke, explaining which ones you can control and which ones you can't.
  • Stroke Statistics
    About 40 percent of stroke survivors have impairments that require special care. This eMedTV Web page discusses other statistics concerning strokes, including those that help illustrate the economic impact of strokes.
  • Stroke Symptoms
    Sudden confusion and numbness in the arms, legs, or face are a few common symptoms of a stroke. This eMedTV resource identifies other possible signs and symptoms, explaining how they usually appear suddenly, often with multiple symptoms at once.
  • Stroke Symptons
    Stroke symptoms can include dizziness, confusion, and numbness or weakness in the limbs or face. This eMedTV article describes common symptoms of a stroke. Stroke symptons is a common misspelling of stroke symptoms.
  • Stroke Symtoms
    Symptoms of a stroke may strike suddenly and can include loss of balance, confusion, and severe headache. This eMedTV Web page lists common signs and links to more information. Stroke symtoms is a common misspelling of stroke symptoms.
  • Stroke Tests
    This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at tests for stroke, which may include blood tests, CT scans, MRIs, and other techniques. This article covers the specific purposes of these tests, and explains how and when they are performed.
  • Stroke Treatment
    For people who have had a stroke, treatment may involve medications (such as clot-busting drugs) or surgery. This eMedTV article discusses these treatment options in detail and also discuses stroke rehab and lifestyle changes.
  • Stuart Prenatal
    Stuart Prenatal is a prenatal vitamin that is available without a prescription. This eMedTV article provides an overview of this product, including information on the benefits of the prenatal vitamin, possible side effects, and tips for taking it.
  • Stumach Cancer
    When cancer cells first form in the stomach, it is called stomach cancer. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses stomach cancer, including possible risk factors and treatment options. Stumach cancer is a common misspelling of stomach cancer.
  • Sturge-Weber Syndrome
    As this eMedTV article explains, Sturge-Weber syndrome is a condition that may be diagnosed when an infant has seizures and a port-wine stain birthmark on the face. This resource provides a detailed description of this condition.
  • Styvarga
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, Stivarga is a chemotherapy drug prescribed to treat colorectal cancer. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Styvarga is a common misspelling of Stivarga.
  • Subacute Sclerosing Panencephalitis
    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a serious infection caused by an altered form of the measles virus. This eMedTV article presents a detailed overview of this condition, with information on its symptoms, stages, treatment, and more.
  • Subcutaneous Glucagon
    In the majority of cases, glucagon is injected just under the skin of a buttock, arm, or thigh. This eMedTV Web page talks about giving glucagon subcutaneously and explains how it may be injected differently by trained healthcare providers.
  • Subcutaneous Velcade
    Given as an intravenous or subcutaneous injection, Velcade is used to treat certain types of cancer. This eMedTV selection offers some details on specific uses of this chemotherapy drug and explains how it is administered. It also links to more details.
  • Subitex
    Subutex is a prescription opioid narcotic drug used to treat opioid dependence. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes how the medicine works, potential side effects, and how the tablets are taken. Subitex is a common misspelling of Subutex.
  • Subitramin
    Sibutramine is a prescription drug used to help people lose weight and keep the weight off. This eMedTV article describes the effects of sibutramine and lists some of its potential side effects. Subitramin is a common misspelling of sibutramine.
  • Subitramina
    Sibutramine is a weight loss drug also used to prevent weight gain in people who have already lost weight. This eMedTV page describes how sibutramine works and offers general warnings for this drug. Subitramina is a common misspelling of sibutramine.
  • Subotex
    Subutex is a prescription drug approved for the treatment of opioid dependence. This eMedTV article describes how this medication works, lists possible side effects, and explains when and how to take it. Subotex is a common misspelling of Subutex.
  • Suboxane
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, a doctor may prescribe Suboxone to treat opioid dependence. This page also talks about the drug's potential for abuse and offers a link to more detailed information. Suboxane is a common misspelling of Suboxone.
  • Suboxon
    This selection from the eMedTV Web archives explains how Suboxone can help treat opioid dependence. This article also takes a brief look at the abuse potential and possible side effects of Suboxone. Suboxon is a common misspelling of Suboxone.
  • Suboxone
    Suboxone is a prescription medicine dissolved under the tongue once daily to treat opioid dependence. This eMedTV Web article provides an in-depth look at this narcotic medication, including how it works, when to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Suboxone Abuse
    Some people may abuse Suboxone, as this medication is an opioid narcotic. This section from the eMedTV Web archives explains why Suboxone abuse is different than a simple, physical dependence on the drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Administration
    Suboxone comes in the form of a tablet or film that is dissolved under the tongue once a day. This eMedTV resource discusses other important administration tips for Suboxone, including how to most effectively use this opioid medication.
  • Suboxone and Antidepressants
    Taking certain MAOIs or antidepressants with Suboxone can cause potentially serious problems. This eMedTV segment describes the complications that may occur when these drugs are taken with Suboxone. A link to more information is also included.
  • Suboxone and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explores the potential risks associated with Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) and pregnancy. This page describes the problems that occurred during animal studies and explains when a doctor may recommend this drug to a pregnant woman.
  • Suboxone Detox
    If you are trying to stop taking opioid drugs, Suboxone may be recommended as part of your detox. This eMedTV Web selection takes a brief look at how this drug is beneficial for treating opioid dependence. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Doctors
    Before buying Suboxone, you must have a prescription from a doctor who is certified to prescribe this drug. This eMedTV segment explains why not all doctors are allowed to prescribe Suboxone. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Suboxone Dosage
    Suboxone comes in the form of a tablet or film, both of which dissolve under the tongue. This eMedTV article describes Suboxone dosing guidelines in more detail, including the factors that may affect your dose and some tips for how to use this opioid.
  • Suboxone Drug Interactions
    Suboxone can cause serious side effects if it is combined with certain medications. This eMedTV segment provides a closer look at the products that may cause drug interactions with Suboxone and describes the complications that can occur.
  • Suboxone Film
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Suboxone film and tablets are used to treat opioid dependence in adults. This page offers a brief overview of this prescription drug, including some tips on how to use it most effectively.
  • Suboxone Medication Information
    This part of eMedTV Web site provides information on Suboxone, a prescription medication used to treat opioid dependence in adults. This article gives a brief overview of how this product is used and provides a link to more details on this opioid drug.
  • Suboxone Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you believe you have overdosed on Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone). This eMedTV page lists possible symptoms that may occur if too much of this drug is used and describes the treatment options that are available.
  • Suboxone Side Effects
    Common side effects of Suboxone include constipation, nausea, and headaches. This article from the eMedTV Web library offers a detailed list of other possible reactions, including potentially serious problems that may require medical attention.
  • Suboxone Treatment
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Suboxone for the treatment of opioid dependence. This eMedTV segment offers a brief look at how this medication works and why it is less likely to be abused than other opioids. A link to more details is also included.
  • Suboxone Withdrawal
    As this eMedTV article explains, symptoms of Suboxone (buprenorphine and naloxone) withdrawal are not necessarily a sign of abuse. This page provides more details on this topic, including possible withdrawal symptoms.
  • Suboxone Withdrawel
    As this eMedTV page explains, suddenly stopping Suboxone may lead to withdrawal symptoms, such as insomnia and hallucinations. Other symptoms of withdrawal from Suboxone are also listed. Suboxone withdrawel is a common misspelling of Suboxone withdrawal.
  • Suboxone Withdrawl
    If you stop taking Suboxone too quickly, it may lead to withdrawal symptoms. This eMedTV page lists possible symptoms of withdrawal from Suboxone and explains how they can be avoided. Suboxone withdrawl is a common misspelling of Suboxone withdrawal.
  • Substitute Drug for Amiodarone
    Some of the possible substitute drugs for amiodarone include flecainide, sotalol, and mexiletine. This eMedTV segment explains when you might want to consider an alternative medication and lists some of the other antiarrhythmia medications available.
  • Substitute for Metanx
    Although there are no exact substitutes for Metanx, there are some similar products available. This eMedTV page explains that Folast, Foltx, and Folbic tablets are considered similar to Metanx. This page also provides a link to more details on this topic.
  • Substitute for Zantac
    An antacid, H2 blocker, or proton pump inhibitor may be a suitable substitute for Zantac. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses these possible alternatives for Zantac, as well as lifestyle changes and surgical alternatives to taking Zantac.
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