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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Relafen and Pregnancy - Retinoblastoma Radiation Treatment

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Relafen and Pregnancy to Retinoblastoma Radiation Treatment. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Relafen and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that while Relafen and pregnancy haven't been studied together in humans, Relafen did show potential fetal problems in animal studies. This page stresses that Relafen should not be taken at all during the third trimester.
  • Relafen and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page suggests things that you can do if you're taking Relafen and weight gain occurs, such as eating a heart-healthy diet. This page also warns that weight gain could signify congestive heart failure in some people taking Relafen.
  • Relafen Dangers
    If you have heart disease or diabetes, you should talk to your healthcare provider before taking Relafen. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at potential Relafen dangers to be aware of, such as congestive heart failure and kidney damage.
  • Relafen Dosage
    As this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, the recommended starting Relafen dosage for osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis is 1000 mg daily. This article also lists the maximum recommended Relafen dose and offers tips on Relafen dosing.
  • Relafen Drug Class
    As this eMedTV article explains, Relafen is in the drug class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and is used to treat the symptoms of certain types of arthritis. This page also covers how the drug works and other possible uses.
  • Relafen Drug Interactions
    Relafen drug interactions can occur with diuretics, ACE inhibitors, aspirin, and several other drugs. This eMedTV page explains that drug interactions with Relafen can increase the risk of bleeding or kidney damage and make some drugs less effective.
  • Relafen Indications
    Some of the uses (or "indications") for Relafen include treating certain types of arthritis. This page from the eMedTV Web site outlines other conditions the medicine is approved for, as well as information on several off-label uses of Relafen.
  • Relafen Medication for Pain
    Relafen is frequently used to treat pain, inflammation, and stiffness caused by certain types of arthritis. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at this pain medication, describing some of Relafen's side effects and safety precautions.
  • Relafen Medication Information
    This article from the eMedTV Web site offers important information on Relafen, a prescription arthritis medication. This segment discusses how this drug works, its approved uses, and dosing. A link to more information on this product is also included.
  • Relafen Oral
    As a type of oral medication, Relafen tablets are approved for treating certain types of arthritis. This eMedTV Web selection provides a brief overview of this prescription product, describing its benefits as well as general dosing precautions.
  • Relafen Pain Reliever
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, Relafen is a type of pain reliever that is available by prescription only. This article gives a brief overview of this drug, explaining its specific uses and why it's not suitable for everyone.
  • Relafen Pills
    Available in the form of pills, Relafen is a prescription drug used for treating arthritis symptoms. This eMedTV Web page talks about the different strengths of this medicine and explains the general dosing guidelines for how to take them.
  • Relafen Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV Web page describes Relafen precautions and warnings to be aware of, such as things to tell your doctor before you take Relafen; possible drug interactions; and side effects like congestive heart failure, swelling, and holes in the stomach.
  • Relafen Risks
    Most people experience a safe, effective treatment with Relafen, but certain risks are associated with it. This eMedTV page describes some of the most important safety concerns to be aware of and lists both common and serious side effects.
  • Relafen Safety
    This eMedTV article explains that although most people do not experience any problems with Relafen, safety is a concern while taking this drug. This resource covers some of these issues, including possible side effects and potentially serious reactions.
  • Relafen Side Effects
    A few common Relafen side effects include dry mouth, ringing in the ears, and gas. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare side effects seen with this drug (such as fatigue) and potentially serious side effects, like liver damage and kidney failure.
  • Relafen Strengths
    This eMedTV page explains that two different strengths of Relafen are available, but the dose a person is prescribed will be determined by various factors. This article further discusses the factors that affect your amount and offers some dosing tips.
  • Relafen Uses
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Relafen treats symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions related to pain, inflammation, swelling, or stiffness. Off-label Relafen uses include treating symptoms of gout and fibromyalgia.
  • Relafin
    This eMedTV page explores Relafen, a drug used to treat symptoms of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other conditions. This page covers Relafen side effects, dosing, and overdose symptoms. Relafin is a common misspelling of Relafen.
  • Relationships and ADHD
    Relationships and ADHD can be a tricky combination; research shows aggressive behavior in children with ADHD may play a major role in peer rejection. This eMedTV article offers tips for handling relationships and ADHD.
  • Relax!
    It's important to try to minimize stress levels, as nervousness can cause more frequent urination. Also, research has shown an increased risk of enlarged prostate in men who have zinc deficiencies. Because stress can lower zinc levels, it's important to try to relax and avoid depleting your levels of zinc. Find relaxing things you enjoy, such as fishing or hiking. Not only will it be fun, but it also will keep you relaxed and help minimize symptoms of an enlarged prostate.
  • Relcore
    Relacore is a weight loss supplement available in both original and nighttime formulas. This eMedTV Web page explains how Relacore may work and lists potential side effects of this product. Relcore is a common misspelling of Relacore.
  • Relecore
    This eMedTV page explains that Relacore is a weight loss supplement. This page also discusses the manufacturer's claims, potential side effects, and what to tell your doctor before using it. Relecore is a common misspelling of Relacore.
  • Relefen
    Relafen is a prescription drug licensed to treat symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV segment offers an overview of Relafen and provides a link to more information. Relefen is a common misspelling of Relafen.
  • Relefin
    This eMedTV article covers Relafen, a drug used to treat symptoms of osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This page stresses that Relafen doesn't cure these conditions or slow their progression. Relefin is a common misspelling of Relafen.
  • Relenza
    Relenza is a prescription drug used for preventing and treating the flu virus. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of this medicine, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to use it.
  • Relenza and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV Web page explains that although it is not known if Relenza (zanamivir) passes through breast milk in humans, it does pass through breast milk in rats. This page also explains what to do if you are taking Relenza and breastfeeding.
  • Relenza and Pregnancy
    Animal studies suggest that Relenza (zanamivir) may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment contains more information on Relenza and pregnancy, and describes the problems that occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Relenza Dosage
    For treating or preventing the flu, the recommended Relenza dosage will depend on several factors. This eMedTV page describes these factors that will affect a person's dosage and provides tips for when and how to use this inhaled medication.
  • Relenza Drug Interactions
    Some inhalers and the intranasal flu vaccine can cause negative interactions when used with Relenza. This eMedTV page describes the problems that these Relenza drug interactions may cause and provides some tips to prevent them.
  • Relenza Flu Medicine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Relenza is a drug used to treat and prevent the flu. This article offers an overview of this medicine, including how to use it, and includes a link to learn more.
  • Relenza Overdose
    Breathing problems could occur with a Relenza (zanamivir) overdose. However, as this eMedTV page explains, there have been no reported cases of Relenza overdose. This page covers some of the problems that could occur and possible treatment options.
  • Relenza Side Effects
    Some of the most common Relenza side effects include dizziness, fever, and joint pain. This part of the eMedTV library lists other common side effects of the drug, as well as some of the potentially serious side effects that may require medical care.
  • Relenza Uses
    Relenza is used for the prevention and treatment of the flu virus. This selection from the eMedTV Web site discusses Relenza uses in more detail, including information on how it works and whether the medication is approved for use in children.
  • Relenza Warnings and Precautions
    Relenza may cause allergic reactions and can make some breathing problems worse. This part of the eMedTV archives describes other complications that may occur with Relenza. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also included.
  • Reliable Resources for Finding Specialists in Cancer Treatment
    Using reliable resources, such as those listed in this eMedTV article, can help lead you to a cancer specialist that is right for you. This page offers a list of organizations to help narrow your search. It also offers tips on what to ask along the way.
  • Relicore
    Relacore is a weight loss supplement that is available without a prescription. This eMedTV resource discusses briefly how Relacore works and explains what to do in case of an overdose. Relicore is a common misspelling of Relacore.
  • Relief for IBS
    This eMedTV page lists several options that can help provide relief for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. This article explains how certain drugs and dietary changes can help to improve (but not cure) symptoms of this digestive condition.
  • Rellacore
    Relacore is a weight loss supplement that is available over-the-counter in two different formulations. This eMedTV article provides a brief overview of Relacore and links to more information. Rellacore is a common misspelling of Relacore.
  • Reloxifene
    Raloxifene can be prescribed to postmenopausal women for two different conditions. This eMedTV page lists these conditions, offers dosing information for the drug, and links to more information. Reloxifene is a common misspelling of raloxifene.
  • Relpax
    Relpax is a prescription medicine that is used to treat a migraine headache as it occurs. This eMedTV article explains how Relpax works to relieve migraine symptoms, outlines some of its potential side effects, and offers tips on taking the drug.
  • Relpax Alternatives
    Axert, Migranal, and Ergomar are a few of the medications that may be used as alternatives to Relpax. This eMedTV Web page covers Relpax alternatives that may be used to treat migraines, including medications and lifestyle changes.
  • Relpax and Heart Problems
    Heart problems, including heart attacks, occurred in people taking Relpax in clinical trials. This eMedTV article discusses Relpax and heart problems, including information about who is most at risk for such problems while taking the medication.
  • Relpax and Pregnancy
    Relpax may not be safe to take during pregnancy. This section of the eMedTV library discusses Relpax and pregnancy, including information about studies that examined the drug's effect on pregnant animals.
  • Relpax Dosage
    The usual Relpax dosage for treating migraines is 20 mg or 40 mg. This eMedTV resource explains that the higher dosage is generally more effective but has more side effects. This page also covers some tips on when and how to take the Relpax tablets.
  • Relpax Drug Information
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, Relpax is a prescription migraine medication. This Web page gives a basic overview of this drug, with information on how it is taken and safety issues to be aware of before starting treatment.
  • Relpax Drug Interactions
    A few drugs that may interact with Relpax include Zoloft, Neoral, and Lexiva. This portion of the eMedTV archives discusses possible Relpax drug interactions and explores the potentially serious effects of such interactions.
  • Relpax Overdose
    Although it is rare, it is possible to overdose on Relpax. This eMedTV article describes some of the potential Relpax overdose symptoms, such as high blood pressure and other heart problems, and outlines possible treatments for a recent overdose.
  • Relpax Side Effects
    Nausea, dizziness, and weakness have been reported by people taking Relpax. This eMedTV segment discusses Relpax side effects, including those that may be serious, and explains which reactions were reported most often in clinical trials.
  • Relpax Uses
    This eMedTV page explores Relpax uses, explaining that although Relpax is licensed to treat migraine headaches in adults, it is also used "off-label" to treat cluster headaches. This page also describes how Relpax works to relieve migraine symptoms.
  • Relpax Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at several Relpax warnings and precautions, such as those concerning heart problems that may occur with the drug. This page also describes groups of people who should not take Relpax.
  • Remacade
    As this eMedTV page explains, a doctor may prescribe Remicade to treat inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis and plaque psoriasis. This page also describes how the drug is administered. Remacade is a common misspelling of Remicade.
  • Remaining Ectopic Tissue (Laparoscopy For Ectopic Pregnancy Risks)
    This video explains why there may be some remaining ectopic tissue after your surgery.
  • Remaining Ectopic Tissue Following Laparoscopy
    Sometimes, there is remaining ectopic tissue following laparoscopy. The information in this section of the eMedTV library explains why there may be tissue remaining following the procedure and how this is usually treated.
  • Remaron
    This eMedTV resource explains how Remeron works to treat depression by balancing certain chemicals in the brain and highlights alternatives for the drug, such as other medicines or therapy. Remaron is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remecade
    Remicade can be used to treat certain inflammatory conditions, like arthritis. This eMedTV resource explores some potential side effects of the drug and outlines the type of conditions it can treat. Remecade is a common misspelling of Remicade.
  • Remedies for Chronic Sinus Infection
    Nasal irrigation is one of the things you can do to relieve symptoms of chronic sinusitis. This page from the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at home remedies for chronic sinus infections and provides a link to more information.
  • Remembering to Take Your Blood Pressure Medicine
    Because you must take it daily, remembering to take your blood pressure medicine can help you avoid things like heart attack and stroke. This eMedTV resource offers tips and suggestions for remembering to take your blood pressure medicine.
  • Remembering to Take Your Heart Medicine
    This eMedTV article provides suggestions for remembering to take your heart medicine, such as using a weekly pillbox, placing reminder notes around the house, or programming a startup message into your computer.
  • Remeran
    Remeron is a prescription drug typically used to treat depression in adults. This portion of the eMedTV library explains how it works, lists potential side effects, and offers dosage information. Remeran is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remeran Side Effects
    Common Remeron side effects may include dry mouth, an increased appetite, or drowsiness. This eMedTV article also lists some of the more serious and rare side effects of the drug. Remeran side effects is a common misspelling of Remeron side effects.
  • Remeron
    Remeron is a prescription medication that is approved to help treat depression. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works, highlights some of its potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Remeron (Mirtazapine)
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Remeron (mirtazapine) is a type of antidepressant. This article gives a brief overview of this drug, exploring the forms in which it is available and some of the most common side effects.
  • Remeron Alternatives
    If Remeron is causing side effects or is not working as well as intended, other options are available. This eMedTV article describes several Remeron alternatives, such as other antidepressants, behavioral therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy.
  • Remeron and Alcohol
    Because Remeron and alcohol affect similar brain chemicals, mixing the two may increase depression symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers precautions for drinking alcohol with Remeron and explains how physicians define moderate drinking.
  • Remeron and Breastfeeding
    Remeron may pass through your breast milk to your nursing infant. This eMedTV article explains the research that has been conducted on Remeron and breastfeeding, and describes what to do if you are prescribed the drug and plan to breastfeed.
  • Remeron and Dry Mouth
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that of the side effects seen with Remeron, dry mouth is one of the most common. This article also outlines some suggestions on how to improve symptoms of a dry mouth, such as sipping water during meals.
  • Remeron and High Blood Pressure
    Remeron can cause high blood pressure in at least 1 percent of people taking the medicine. This eMedTV resource explores Remeron and high blood pressure in more detail, and explains what to do if you develop the condition while taking it.
  • Remeron and Weight Gain
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explores Remeron and weight gain, explaining that clinical studies have shown that it is a common side effect of the medication. This article also outlines some suggestions for controlling weight gain.
  • Remeron Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that the starting dosage of Remeron when treating depression is 15 mg, taken once daily at bedtime. Your physician may increase this dose up to a maximum of 45 mg per day. This page also offers tips for taking the drug.
  • Remeron for Fibromyalgia
    Although Remeron is approved to treat depression, it may also be useful in treating fibromyalgia. This eMedTV article discusses the results of one study involving Remeron for fibromyalgia treatment and explains why more research needs to be done.
  • More About Remeron for Sleep Apnea
    Some studies have shown that using Remeron for sleep apnea treatment can be effective. This eMedTV page explains that although the drug is not approved for this use, studies involving rats and humans have shown that it can help relieve symptoms.
  • Remeron Overdose
    This eMedTV article outlines some of the potential symptoms of a Remeron overdose, such as disorientation, drowsiness, or a rapid heart rate. This resource also describes treatments options for an overdose, such as IV fluids and supportive care.
  • Remeron Sexual Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, clinical studies have shown that there are potential sexual side effects of Remeron, such as changes in sex drive and erectile dysfunction. This page also explains what to do if you these sexual side effects occur.
  • Remeron Side Effects
    Some of the more common side effects of Remeron include drowsiness, dizziness, and weakness. This eMedTV segment also highlights some of the problems that you should report to your doctor, as well as rare side effects associated with the drug.
  • Remeron Uses
    This portion of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at using Remeron for depression in adults. This page also describes how the drug works to increase the levels of certain chemicals in the brain and also describes off-label uses.
  • Remeron Withdrawal
    This eMedTV resource explains that withdrawal from Remeron can occur if the medication is abruptly stopped. This page also lists possible withdrawal symptoms and describes what your healthcare provider may do to prevent them.
  • Remeron Withdrawl
    Symptoms of Remeron withdrawal can occur if the medication is stopped abruptly. This eMedTV page lists potential symptoms of withdrawal and discusses ways to minimize them. Remeron withdrawl is a common misspelling of Remeron withdrawal.
  • Remicade
    Remicade is a prescription medication that is approved to treat certain inflammatory conditions. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works to relieve symptoms of these conditions, lists potential side effects, and covers general dosing guidelines.
  • Remicade for Crohn's Disease
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Remicade is used to treat a number of conditions, including Crohn's disease. This article offers more details on using this prescription drug for Crohn's disease and also provides a link to more in-depth information.
  • Remicade for Ulcerative Colitis
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, Remicade is prescribed for ulcerative colitis and certain other inflammatory conditions. This article offers an overview of how this medication can help relieve ulcerative colitis symptoms such as diarrhea.
  • Remicade IV Infusion
    As this eMedTV article explains, Remicade is a medication that is administered through an IV infusion. This resource describes how the intravenous infusion is given and explains how your doctor will determine the right dose of Remicade for you.
  • Remicade Medication Information
    This eMedTV page offers basic information on Remicade, a medication used to treat Crohn's disease and other inflammatory conditions. This page describes how it is given, possible side effects to be aware of, and what to tell the doctor prescribing it.
  • Remicade Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource discusses potential Remicade side effects, including headaches, infections, and anemia. This page describes the common and rare side effects of the drug, as well as side effects that may need immediate medical attention.
  • Remicaid
    This eMedTV page explains that Remicade is a prescribed drug used to treat inflammatory conditions affecting the joints, skin, and digestive system. This page also offers precautions when taking the drug. Remicaid is a common misspelling of Remicade.
  • Remicaide
    Remicade is a prescription drug used to treat certain inflammatory conditions. This eMedTV article lists the conditions Remicade can treat and also describes factors that can affect your dosage. Remicaide is a common misspelling of Remicade.
  • Remoran
    As this eMedTV segment explains, a doctor may prescribe Remeron to treat depression. This page also explains how Remeron works and possible side effects. A link to more detailed information is also provided. Remoran is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remoron
    This portion of the eMedTV Web library explains that Remeron is a prescription medication used to treat depression. This page also covers general dosing guidelines and lists symptoms of a Remeron overdose. Remoron is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Remron
    Remeron is a prescription medication that may help relieve symptoms of depression. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of Remeron and describes some of its possible side effects. Remron is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Renexa
    Available by prescription, Ranexa extended-release tablets are taken twice daily to control angina. This eMedTV page contains a brief overview of what this drug is used for, dosing instructions, and side effects. Renexa is a common misspelling of Ranexa.
  • Renexa ER
    As this eMedTV segment explains, adults who have chronic angina (chest pain) may benefit from Ranexa, an extended-release (ER) medication. This page explores Ranexa, including some of its side effects. Renexa ER is a common misspelling of Ranexa ER.
  • Repaglinide
    Repaglinide is a prescription drug that is licensed to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works to increase insulin production, lists potential side effects, and offers tips on taking it.
  • Requip
    Requip is a dopamine agonist that helps relieve symptoms of Parkinson's disease and restless legs syndrome. This eMedTV page further describes this drug and its uses, as well as dosage guidelines, potential side effects, and more.
  • Requip and Restless Legs Syndrome
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site offers information on restless legs syndrome and Requip, including details on how the drug performed in clinical trials. Information on side effects is also included.
  • Requip Medicine
    Requip is approved to treat restless legs syndrome and Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV Web resource briefly describes this medicine, exploring how Requip works and how often it is taken. A link to more details is also included.
  • Requip Side Effects
    This eMedTV segment lists potential side effects of Requip and also offers precautions and warnings about the drug. Most patients taking Requip do not experience side effects or only experience minor side effects, such as nausea or fatigue.
  • Requip XL
    Requip XL is a drug prescribed to treat Parkinson's disease by stimulating certain receptors in the brain. This eMedTV article provides an overview of Requip XL, including information on how this drug works, possible side effects, dosing tips, and more.
  • Rescula
    Rescula is a medicine prescribed to treat open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. This selection from the eMedTV Web library offers an overview of this medicine, including details on how it works, potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rescula & Diabetes
    If you have diabetes, using Rescula could increase your risk for macular edema. This part of the eMedTV Web library examines how this eye drop may not be safe for some people and offers a link to more detailed safety warnings for Rescula.
  • Rescula Medication Information
    Rescula is used to lower eye pressure in people with ocular hypertension or open angle glaucoma. This eMedTV resource provides more information on the medication, including possible side effects of Rescula, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Research on Klinefelter Syndrome
    Research on Klinefelter syndrome is focused on understanding the disease better and finding a cure. This eMedTV article discusses research this condition in detail, including current areas of focus and potential benefits for research participants.
  • Research on Narcolepsy
    As explained in this eMedTV article, current research on narcolepsy is focused on understanding the cause of this sleep disorder, as well as improving the methods of detecting and treating it. This page discusses narcolepsy research in detail.
  • Research on PTSD
    As this eMedTV segment explains, research indicates that people with previous traumatic experiences are more likely to develop PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). This article also looks at how hormones and brain anatomy are involved in PTSD.
  • Resparate
    RESPeRATE is a device used for lowering blood pressure. This page on the eMedTV site explains how RESPeRATE works and offers information on where you can purchase the machine. Resparate is a common misspelling of RESPeRATE.
  • RESPeRATE
    RESPeRATE is a medical device that teaches you "paced breathing" to help lower blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page explores the effectiveness of RESPeRATE, describes how the device works, and explains where you can obtain the machine.
  • RESPeRATE for Blood Pressure
    This eMedTV resource talks about how you may be able to lower your blood pressure by using RESPeRATE. This article briefly explores how the product works and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • RESPeRATE for Lowering Blood Pressure
    Many people find using RESPeRATE for lowering blood pressure to be effective. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how the medical device works, describes the effects of RESPeRATE, and offers important precautions for using this machine.
  • Resperdal
    Risperdal is a medicine used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and emotional symptoms of autism. This eMedTV page explains how Risperdal works and describes the drug's potential side effects. Resperdal is a common misspelling of Risperdal.
  • Resperdol
    Risperdal is a prescription drug licensed to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism symptoms. This eMedTV segment explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting this drug. Resperdol is a common misspelling of Risperdal.
  • Resperidone
    This eMedTV page features a brief overview of risperidone, a prescription drug used to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability due to autism. This page also lists some side effects. Resperidone is a common misspelling of risperidone.
  • Respirate
    RESPeRATE is a machine that helps you learn paced breathing to reduce blood pressure levels. This eMedTV article describes how the device works and explains how long each treatment "session" lasts. Respirate is a common misspelling of RESPeRATE.
  • Respiratory Depression With Fentanyl
    As this eMedTV segment explains, potentially life-threatening breathing problems, called respiratory depression, can occur in people taking fentanyl. This article takes a look at who may have an increased risk of respiratory depression with fentanyl.
  • Respiratory Disease COPD
    This eMedTV article talks about the respiratory disease COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), a condition that results when the lungs become damaged from things such as cigarette smoking. This page also describes symptoms and tips on prevention.
  • Respirdal
    A doctor may prescribe Risperdal to treat bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. This eMedTV resource covers other Risperdal uses and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Respirdal is a common misspelling of Risperdal.
  • Respirdol
    Risperdal can be prescribed to relieve symptoms of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism. This eMedTV segment describes the drug in more detail and explains what effects it has on these conditions. Respirdol is a common misspelling of Risperdal.
  • Respiridone
    This page from the eMedTV library explains how risperidone works to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability due to autism. This page also covers factors that may affect your dosage. Respiridone is a common misspelling of risperidone.
  • Restaril
    Restoril is a drug that is used for the short-term treatment of insomnia. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Restaril is a common misspelling of Restoril.
  • Restasis
    Restasis is a medicine prescribed to increase tear production in people with chronic dry eyes. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this eye drop, including details on how it works, potential side effects, and dosing tips for using this medicine.
  • Restasis Dosage
    For treating dry eyes, apply one drop of Restasis into each eye twice a day, with 12 hours between doses. This eMedTV page offers more details on the standard dosage of Restasis, including important tips for when and how to use this eye drop.
  • Restasis Eye Drops
    Available by prescription, Restasis is used to treat chronic dry eyes. This page from the eMedTV site provides important information on Restasis eye drops, including possible side effects and details on who may not be able to safely use this medicine.
  • Restasis Medication Information
    Restasis is a prescription eye drop used to treat chronic dry eyes. This eMedTV page offers more information on this medication, including how Restasis works, side effects, and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this product.
  • Restasis Side Effects
    In clinical trials, burning in the eyes was the most common Restasis side effect. This eMedTV segment lists several other possible reactions to this medication, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical care.
  • Restesis
    Restasis eye drops may be prescribed to treat chronic dry eyes. This selection from the eMedTV library further describes how this medicine works, covers general safety precautions, and lists side effects. Restesis is a common misspelling of Restasis.
  • Restless Legs Syndrom Symptoms
    Common symptoms of restless legs syndrome include burning, creeping, or tugging sensations inside the legs. This eMedTV page describes these and other symptoms. Restless legs syndrom symptoms is a common variation of symptoms of restless legs syndrome.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a disorder identified by unpleasant sensations in the legs. As this eMedTV segment explains, it results in an almost irresistible urge to move them. This page covers RLS and its causes, symptoms, prognosis, and more.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS)
    This eMedTV selection explains that up to 15 percent of the American population is estimated to have restless legs syndrome (RLS). This article takes a closer look at this condition, exploring its symptoms and the goals of treatment.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome Causes
    As this eMedTV article explains, restless legs syndrome causes can include a disease, medications, other substances, or the cause can be unknown. This page describes the possible causes for both primary and secondary restless legs syndrome.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome Research
    Two specific areas of restless legs syndrome research include understanding dopamine and pallidotomy. This eMedTV segment describes the latest research on restless legs syndrome and explains how it could lead to improved treatment.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome Treatment
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, treating restless legs syndrome (RLS) usually involves lifestyle changes or medications. This article offers various options for RLS treatment, such as getting adequate exercise and setting a regular sleep pattern.
  • Restoril
    Restoril is a drug used for the treatment of insomnia. This eMedTV article provides a complete overview of this sleep medication, including information on the drug's dosing guidelines, available strengths, and possible side effects.
  • Restoril Abuse
    Taking Restoril for longer than seven to ten days increases your risk of becoming addicted. This eMedTV page discusses Restoril abuse, including some of the signs of withdrawal and information on what to do if you feel you can't stop taking the drug.
  • Restoril Drug Information
    If you have insomnia, your healthcare provider may recommend a medication called Restoril. This eMedTV segment gives some basic information on Restoril, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking this drug.
  • Restoril Side Effects
    Common side effects of Restoril include lethargy, dizziness, and hangover. This eMedTV page offers a list of problems that may occur with the drug, including less common side effects and problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Resuvastatin
    This eMedTV resource explains how the prescription medication rosuvastatin works to treat several conditions related to heart disease. This page also offers tips for when and how to take the drug. Resuvastatin is a common misspelling of rosuvastatin.
  • Retalin
    Ritalin is a prescription medicine that can be used for the treatment of ADHD and narcolepsy. This eMedTV page briefly covers the uses and effects of the drug and provides a link to more information. Retalin is a common misspelling of Ritalin.
  • Retapamulin
    Available by prescription, retapamulin is a type of ointment used for treating impetigo. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at the medicine, including information on how it works, tips for using the ointment, and potential side effects.
  • Retilin
    Ritalin is a medicine that can be used to treat narcolepsy and ADHD. This part of the eMedTV archives further explores how the medication works, describes its effects, and lists possible side effects. Retilin is a common misspelling of Ritalin.
  • Retinablastoma
    Retinoblastoma is a type of eye cancer occurring most frequently in children under the age of five. This eMedTV page discusses possible symptoms and precautions of retinoblastoma. Retinablastoma is a common misspelling of retinoblastoma.
  • Retinoblastoma
    Retinoblastoma is a type of cancer affecting the eye that usually occurs in children under the age of 5. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this condition, including information about its symptoms, its diagnosis, and its treatment.
  • Retinoblastoma Cancer
    A type of eye cancer, retinoblastoma occurs most frequently in children under the age of five. This eMedTV article takes a quick look at this condition and provides a link to more detailed information.
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