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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Rabies Treatment - Relafen 500 mg Tablets

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Rabies Treatment to Relafen 500 mg Tablets. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Rabies Treatment
    As this eMedTV article explains, post-exposure rabies treatment involves a series of injections with rabies immune globulin and rabies vaccine. While this treatment is extremely effective, it must be started before the onset of symptoms.
  • Rabies Vaccine
    In most cases, the rabies vaccine is given after a person has been exposed to rabies. As discussed in this eMedTV article, when the vaccine is administered before the onset of symptoms, it is extremely effective.
  • Rabies Virus
    The rabies virus is an RNA virus that attacks the nervous system in mammals, including humans. This eMedTV page describes how the virus is transmitted (usually by an animal bite) and explains how rabies may cause serious symptoms and even death.
  • Radiation Therapy for Melanoma
    As this eMedTV segment explains, radiation therapy may be used to help control the spread of melanoma. This article describes this treatment option in detail, including when your healthcare provider may recommend it, as well as possible side effects.
  • Radiation Treatment for Colon Cancer
    Radiotherapy, also known as radiation treatment for colon cancer, uses radiation to kill cancer cells. This eMedTV Web page discusses this treatment options at length, with information about common side effects and what to do if you experience them.
  • Radiation Treatment for Prostate Cancer
    There are external and internal means of delivering radiation treatment for prostate cancer. This page of the eMedTV Web library discusses this option for treating prostate cancer in detail, including potential side effects.
  • Radiation Treatment for Thyroid Cancer
    High-energy rays are often used to kill thyroid cancer cells. This eMedTV article provides information about how radiation treatment for thyroid cancer is administered, typical treatment schedules, and potential side effects.
  • Radioactive Iodine for Thyroid Cancer
    This eMedTV resource explains how radioactive iodine is used to treat thyroid cancer and discusses potential side effects of the treatment. This article also explains who should not receive this type of cancer treatment.
  • Radion
    Radon is a colorless, natural gas that is present in nearly all air and breathed in daily. This eMedTV page explains where high levels of radon accumulate and covers the risk of long-term exposure to this gas. Radion is a common misspelling of radon.
  • Radon
    Radon is a radioactive gas that usually exists at low levels outdoors. This eMedTV article discusses the increased risk of lung cancer that is associated with long-term exposure to high levels of radon, especially when combined with cigarette smoke.
  • Rafampin
    Rifampin is prescribed to treat tuberculosis and certain other bacterial problems. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of this antibiotic, with info on warnings and potential side effects. Rafampin is a common misspelling of rifampin.
  • Raglan
    Reglan is a prescription drug used for treating GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV article describes how Reglan works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Raglan is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Ragweed Allergies
    Many different plants in the ragweed family cause allergies. This eMedTV resource covers ragweed allergies in detail, providing information on when pollen levels are at their highest and ways to lower your exposure to pollen.
  • Raise HDL
    Lifestyle changes, such as losing weight, can raise HDL (the "good cholesterol"). This eMedTV resource outlines lifestyle changes, such as exercising more, that can be used to raise this type of cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease.
  • Raising HDL
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, raising HDL levels above 60 mg/dL can protect against heart disease and heart attack. This article highlights how lifestyle changes and certain medications can be effective in increasing HDL levels in the blood.
  • Raloxifen
    Raloxifene is a prescription drug that can be used for postmenopausal women who have osteoporosis. As this eMedTV segment explains, it can also be used to prevent breast cancer in these women. Raloxifen is a common misspelling of raloxifene.
  • Raloxifene
    Raloxifene is prescribed to treat postmenopausal women for osteoporosis. As this eMedTV article explains, it can also help reduce their risk of breast cancer. The drug's effects, dosing guidelines, and side effects are also described in detail.
  • Raloxifene Side Effects
    Although most people have no problems with raloxifene, side effects can occur. This eMedTV segment lists the most common adverse reactions, rare side effects, and problems that should be reported immediately to your healthcare provider.
  • Raloxifine
    Raloxifene was initially used for osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. As this eMedTV page explains, it helps prevent breast cancer, too. The drug's effects and dosing guidelines are also described. Raloxifine is a common misspelling of raloxifene.
  • Raloxiphene
    Raloxifene, as this eMedTV page explains, is used for osteoporosis, but can also help reduce the risk of breast cancer. A brief overview of the drug and a link to more information is included. Raloxiphene is a common misspelling of raloxifene.
  • Ralpax
    Relpax is a drug used to relieve symptoms of migraine headaches. This portion of the eMedTV site briefly explains how Replax works and provides a link to more detailed information about the drug. Ralpax is a common misspelling of Relpax.
  • Raltegravir
    Raltegravir is only approved for use with other medications to treat HIV infection and AIDS. This eMedTV page offers information on the effects of this prescription drug, tips on when and how to take it, and potential side effects.
  • Ramarin
    Remeron is a prescription medication that is licensed to treat depression. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes Remeron in more detail and offers some general precautions for taking the drug. Ramarin is a common misspelling of Remeron.
  • Ramelteon
    Ramelteon is prescribed to treat insomnia in people who have trouble falling asleep. This eMedTV article provides important information on this drug, including its effects, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Ramicade
    As this eMedTV Web article explains, Remicade is a medicine prescribed to treat several inflammatory conditions. This page also discusses what to tell your doctor before starting the medication. Ramicade is a common misspelling of Remicade.
  • Ramipril
    Ramipril is mainly used for the treatment of high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This part of the eMedTV Web site covers the effects of ramipril, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Ramipril Side Effects
    Dizziness, headache, and cough are a few common side effects of ramipril. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare side effects, like arthritis and constipation, and explains the importance of talking with your healthcare provider if such problems occur.
  • Ramipril Tablets
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on ramipril tablets, which are mainly used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This Web page also covers side effects and includes a link to more details.
  • Ramsay Hunt Syndrome
    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a common complication of shingles. As this eMedTV article explains, it is characterized by intense ear pain and paralysis of facial nerves. This article provides an overview of this condition.
  • Ranatidine
    Ranitidine is a drug that is used to treat heartburn, stomach ulcers, and other conditions. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of ranitidine and a link to more detailed information. Ranatidine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Ranatidine Hydrochloride
    Ranitidine is a medication that is used to treat problems related to the esophagus, intestines, and stomach. This eMedTV segment offers a concise look at ranitidine. Ranatidine hydrochloride is a common variation and misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Ranexa
    Ranexa is available by prescription only and is approved to treat chronic angina (chest pain). This eMedTV resource explores this prescription drug in more detail, with information on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Ranexa 1000 Mg
    As this eMedTV page discusses, a healthcare provider may recommend taking 1000 mg of Ranexa a day to help prevent angina (chest pain). This article explores the dosing guidelines for this medication and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Ranexa 500 Mg
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, a healthcare provider may recommend taking Ranexa 500 mg twice daily for preventing angina (chest pain). This article examines some dosing instructions for this medication and offers a link to more information.
  • Ranexa Drug Interactions
    Using Cerebyx, grapefruit juice, or other products while taking Ranexa may lead to drug interactions. This eMedTV article examines the complications that may occur when Ranexa is combined with these and a number of other medications.
  • Ranexa Medication Information
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Ranexa to help control angina (chest pain) in adults. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on this medication, including why Ranexa may not be safe for some people, dosing tips, and potential side effects.
  • Ranexa Side Affects
    If you are using Ranexa, you may develop side effects like headaches or nausea. This eMedTV page lists other common problems, as well as a few that are possibly serious. Ranexa side affects is a common misspelling of Ranexa side effects.
  • Ranexa Side Effects
    Some people who took Ranexa in clinical trials reported problems like constipation and headaches. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at some of the other possible Ranexa side effects, including a few complications that require treatment.
  • Ranibizumab
    Ranibizumab is a drug prescribed to treat macular edema and age-related wet macular degeneration. This eMedTV segment describes how the medication works, explains when and how it is administered, and lists possible side effects that may occur.
  • Ranibizumab Injection for Macular Degeneration
    If you have wet macular degeneration, your healthcare provider may recommend ranibizumab injections. This eMedTV selection offers a brief overview of this prescription medication and includes a link to learn more.
  • Ranitadine
    As this eMedTV page explains, ranitidine is used for treating various conditions involving the stomach, esophagus, or intestines (such as heartburn and ulcers). This page further discusses ranitidine uses. Ranitadine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Ranitidin
    This eMedTV article explains that ranitidine is used to treat various conditions, such as ulcers and heartburn. This page also lists some common side effects and provides general dosing guidelines. Ranitidin is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Ranitidine
    Ranitidine is a drug that may be used to treat heartburn, ulcers, GERD, and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page covers both over-the-counter and prescription forms of ranitidine, including details about how they reduce acid in the stomach.
  • Ranitidine HCl
    If you have heartburn or acid indigestion, you may benefit from ranitidine HCl. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at this drug, with information on how often it is taken and what else it can be used for. A link to more details is also included.
  • Ranitidine Side Effects
    Common side effects of ranitidine include upset stomach, headache, and diarrhea. This eMedTV segment discusses the side effects of this medicine, including information about rare but serious health problems that may occur with the medication.
  • Ranolazine
    Taking ranolazine can help control chronic angina (chest pain) in adults. This part of the eMedTV Web library features more details on this prescription medication, including dosing instructions, possible side effects, and more.
  • Ranolazine Mechanism
    As this eMedTV segment explains, ranolazine may work to prevent angina (chest pain) by affecting certain sodium currents in the heart. This article looks at ranolazine's mechanism of action and explains why ranolazine is different from other angina drugs.
  • Ranolazine Side Effects
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, some of the most common side effects of ranolazine include nausea, headaches, and dizziness. Other common problems are listed in this article, as are potentially serious problems requiring immediate medical care.
  • Rantadine
    This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of ranitidine, a medication used to treat conditions such as ulcers and heartburn. This page lists other uses and explains what to do before taking the drug. Rantadine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Rantidine
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of ranitidine, a medication used to treat conditions such as heartburn, indigestion, and ulcers. This page also describes some general precautions with the drug. Rantidine is a common misspelling of ranitidine.
  • Rapaflo
    Rapaflo is a prescription medicine approved for relieving the symptoms of an enlarged prostate. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes how the drug works, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Rapaflow
    Rapaflo is a medication often prescribed to treat the signs and symptoms of an enlarged prostate. This eMedTV segment explains how Rapaflo works and offers general dosing guidelines for the drug. Rapaflow is a common misspelling of Rapaflo.
  • Rapamune
    People who have had a kidney transplant may be prescribed Rapamune. This part of the eMedTV site gives a complete overview of this medication, with details on available strengths, potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Rapamune Monitoring
    When you are taking Rapamune, your doctor will give you blood tests to make sure you are at the right dose. This eMedTV segment offers more information on the monitoring that will be done while taking this drug.
  • Rapamune Side Effects
    While taking Rapamune, some people develop side effects like high blood pressure or swelling of the hands. This eMedTV Web page takes you through a more detailed list of potential side effects, with instructions on what to do if serious reactions occur.
  • Rapamune Solution
    As explained in this eMedTV article, you can buy Rapamune as an oral solution (liquid) or a tablet. This article offers some quick dosing tips for using the oral solution and provides a link to more in-depth instructions.
  • Rapidflo
    Rapaflo is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating symptoms of an enlarged prostate. This eMedTV resource explains how Rapaflo works, describes its effects, and lists some potential side effects. Rapidflo is a common misspelling of Rapaflo.
  • Rappamune
    Rapamune helps reduce the risk of organ rejection after a kidney transplant. This eMedTV selection tells you what you need to know about this prescription drug and provides a link to more information. Rappamune is a common misspelling of Rapamune.
  • Rare (Unusual) and Negative Side Effects of Lipitor
    Some of the rare Lipitor side effects include depression, hair loss, and impotence. This eMedTV Web article provides an overview of other rare (unusual) and negative side effects of Lipitor. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Rare Symptoms of Strep Throat
    A sore throat lasting more than a week, a cough, or a runny nose would be rare symptoms of strep throat. This eMedTV page explains how symptoms such as these are more likely caused by a viral infection. A list of common strep symptoms is also included.
  • Rasagaline
    Rasagiline is a prescription Parkinson's disease medication. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains how rasagiline is used, describes its effects, and lists some of its potential side effects. Rasagaline is a common misspelling of rasagiline.
  • Rasagiline
    Rasagiline is a medication often prescribed for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. This eMedTV Web page describes rasagiline in more detail, explains how it works, and offers information on when and how to take the medication safely.
  • Rasburicase
    Rasburicase is approved to manage uric acid levels in people who have certain types of cancer. This eMedTV Web selection presents an in-depth look at this prescription medicine, including how it is given, how it works, potential side effects, and more.
  • Rasburicase and Gout
    Prescribing rasburicase for the treatment of gout is considered an off-label (unapproved) use of the drug. This eMedTV segment discusses what this drug is approved for and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Rasburicase Dosing
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, rasburicase is given as an infusion once a day for up to five days. This article looks at the factors that may affect dosing guidelines for rasburicase and provides a link to more details.
  • Ravatio
    Revatio is a prescription medicine used for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Revatio, including the benefits of this drug and possible side effects. Ravatio is a common misspelling of Revatio.
  • Rayden
    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is present in nearly all air. This eMedTV page explains where radon comes from and describes the problems that may occur with long-term exposure to the gas. Rayden is a common misspelling of radon.
  • Raydon
    Radon is a radioactive gas that, when inhaled, can damage the cells that line the lung. As this eMedTV page explains, everyone breathes in low levels of radon, but high levels of exposure can lead to lung cancer. Raydon is a common misspelling of radon.
  • Raynaud's Disease
    Raynaud's disease involves a lack of blood supply to the extremities. As this eMedTV article explains, this can result in numbness, tingling, and other symptoms. This page takes a closer look at the causes, symptoms, and treatment of this condition.
  • Raynaud's Phenomenon
    This eMedTV page describes Raynaud's phenomenon, a condition affecting small blood vessels in the fingers, toes, nose, and ears, often triggered by exposure to cold. This page also explains symptoms and treatment options associated with the condition.
  • Raynaud's Treatment
    Since there is no cure for Raynaud's, treatment is designed to minimize attacks and control symptoms. This eMedTV resource describes several options doctors use to treat the condition, including self-help measures and medications.
  • Razadine
    Razadyne is a prescription drug licensed to treat mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of this medication and lists common side effects that have been reported. Razadine is a common misspelling of Razadyne.
  • Razadyne
    Razadyne is a prescription drug that is approved for treating mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. This eMedTV page describes the various forms of the drug, explains how it works, and lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment.
  • Razadyne Side Effects
    Headaches, dizziness, and nausea are some of the most commonly reported side effects of Razadyne. As this eMedTV segment explains, while most side effects are mild, some require immediate medical attention, such as fainting or uncontrollable twitches.
  • Reactions to Zyclara
    If you are using Zyclara, skin reactions like redness or dryness are likely to occur. This eMedTV Web page examines some of the most commonly reported side effects of this medicated skin cream. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Reactive Arthris
    Reactive arthritis is most common in men between the ages of 20 and 40. This eMedTV page further describes this type of arthritis, which occurs in response to an infection in the body. Reactive arthris is a common misspelling of reactive arthritis.
  • Reactive Arthritis
    Reactive arthritis develops in response to an infection in the body. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed look at this form of arthritis, including information on its causes, symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • Rebela
    Rubella is a viral illness that typically lasts three days. This article from the eMedTV library lists common symptoms and possible complications of rubella and also explains what treatment usually involves. Rebela is a common misspelling of rubella.
  • Rebella
    Rubella is a viral illness that is similar to measles. This page on the eMedTV Web site explains how the rubella virus is transmitted, lists symptoms of the illness, and explores treatment options. Rebella is a common misspelling of rubella.
  • Rebeprazole
    Rabeprazole is a prescription medicine licensed to treat conditions such as duodenal ulcers and GERD. This eMedTV Web resource explains how rabeprazole works, and describes possible side effects. Rebeprazole is a common misspelling of rabeprazole.
  • Rebif
    Rebif is a prescription medicine that is used to treat multiple sclerosis. This article from the eMedTV archives explores how Rebif works and offers more information on its dosing guidelines, effects, and potential side effects.
  • Rebif Injection for MS
    As explained in this portion of the eMedTV library, healthcare providers may prescribe Rebif to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). This article gives a brief description of using Rebif for MS, including a link to more details on this injected drug.
  • Rebif Side Effects
    Common side effects of Rebif may include back pain, drowsiness, and dry mouth. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV page also lists less common but serious side effects that require medical attention, such as chest pain or seizures.
  • Rebola
    Rubella is a typically mild illness that is caused by a specific virus. This article on the eMedTV Web site describes possible symptoms of the illness and explains how the rubella virus is transmitted. Rebola is a common misspelling of rubella.
  • Reclast
    Reclast is a drug used to help treat the breakdown of bone associated with Paget's disease and osteoporosis. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed look at the drug, including information on its effects, side effects, dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Reclast Side Effects
    A few common Reclast side effects include joint pain, fever, and headache. This eMedTV Web page describes other side effects seen with the drug, including the ones that are less common and ones that should be reported immediately to your doctor.
  • Reclipsen
    Reclipsen is a prescription birth control pill that works by stopping ovulation. This eMedTV resource discusses how Reclipsen works, describes when and how to take it, and explains what you should know before using this form of birth control.
  • Recommended Dose Erlotinib
    As this eMedTV page explains, your doctor will recommend a dose of erlotinib based on what type of cancer you have, among many other factors. This article looks at other things that affect your dose and links to more dosing guidelines on this drug.
  • Recovery From Catarac Surgery
    After cataract surgery, you may notice your vision improving a few hours after the procedure. This eMedTV page discusses recovery from cataract surgery. Recovery from catarac surgery is a common misspelling and variation of after cataract surgery.
  • Recovery from Pulmonary Embolism
    As this eMedTV page explains, pulmonary embolism recovery can involve taking medications and having regular blood tests. This article takes an in-depth look at what you can do to ensure a successful recovery.
  • Recovery From Tubal Ligation
    During your tubal ligation recovery, you may experience pain, chills, nausea, and other symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at the recovery process and what you can expect after your tubal ligation.
  • Recovery From Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery
    Recovery from vestibular schwannoma surgery generally starts with spending four to six days in the hospital. This eMedTV segment offers a look at the typical recovery process -- from waking up in ICU to follow-up care after you leave the hospital.
  • Recovery Time for Tubal Ligation
    As you recover from tubal ligation, you may experience pain, chills, nausea, and other symptoms. This eMedTV resource offers an in-depth look at the recovery process and what you can expect during the recovery time for tubal ligation.
  • Recreational Use of Dextromethorphan
    Although dextromethorphan is typically safe when used as directed, abusing it could cause serious problems. This eMedTV article takes a look at reported cases of dextromethorphan use for recreational purposes and the dangerous complications that occurred.
  • Rectal Bleed
    As this eMedTV segment explains, rectal bleeds are most often caused by hemorrhoids. However, they have many other potential causes. This article gives an overview of rectal bleeding and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Rectal Bleeding
    Rectal bleeding can be a symptom of various diseases, from hemorrhoids to cancer. This page from the eMedTV archives explains the types of bleeding that can occur, possible causes, treatment options, and diagnostic procedures.
  • Rectal Bleeding Causes
    This eMedTV Web page provides an in-depth look at typical rectal bleeding causes. They can range from serious conditions, such as infections and cancer, to less serious ones, such as hemorrhoids and anal fissures.
  • Rectal Cancer
    Rectal cancer is a disease that occurs when cancer cells form in the tissue of the rectum. This eMedTV article discusses this condition in detail, including information about risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment options.
  • Rectal Cancer Chemotherapy
    As this eMedTV page explains, chemotherapy is one of the common treatment options for rectal cancer. This article explains how chemotherapy is used to treat this type of cancer and includes information about the possible side effects of the treatment.
  • Rectal Cancer Information
    Looking for information on rectal cancer? This eMedTV Web page gives a brief overview of this condition, with details on symptoms, risk factors, and more. Also included is a list of possible treatment options.
  • Rectal Cancer Prognosis
    A rectal cancer prognosis is a prediction as to the outcome of the disease. This eMedTV Web page discusses factors that affect a prognosis for a person with rectal cancer (such as the stage of the cancer) and includes 5-year survival rates.
  • Rectal Cancer Stages
    Rectal cancer stages are used to express if the cancer has spread, and, if so, how far it has spread. This eMedTV resource defines the six rectal cancer stages -- stages 0-IV and recurrent cancer -- and looks at tests used in the staging process.
  • Rectal Cancer Surgery
    For all stages of rectal cancer, surgery to remove the tumor is the most common form of treatment. This eMedTV segment discusses the three main types of surgery for this condition: local excision, resection, and resection with colostomy.
  • Rectal Cancer Survival Rates
    As this eMedTV resource explains, survival rates for rectal cancer reflect the percentage of people who survive for a specific period after their diagnosis. This article contains five-year survival rates based on staging data for this disease.
  • Rectal Cancer Symptoms
    Examples of rectal cancer symptoms include diarrhea, constipation, and blood in the stool. This eMedTV article discusses these and other symptoms of rectal cancer, such as a change in the frequency of bowel movements, abdominal discomfort, and fatigue.
  • Rectal Cancer Treatment
    Rectal cancer treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or a combination of these. This eMedTV segment discusses rectal cancer treatment, including information about second opinions, clinical trials, and follow-up care.
  • Rectiv
    Your healthcare provider may recommend Rectiv if you have pain caused by chronic anal fissures. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this medicated ointment, with details on how to use it, what to expect, drug warnings, and more.
  • Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections
    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are defined as having 2 infections in 6 months or 3 in 1 year. This eMedTV article discusses recurrent UTIs and provides tips for preventing them, such as drinking plenty of water and cranberry juice.
  • Red Clover
    Red clover is an herbal product that is claimed to relieve menopause symptoms. This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of red clover, including information on its effectiveness, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Red Clover Extract
    Many women take red clover extract to relieve symptoms of menopause. However, as this eMedTV article explains, this product can also be used for other reasons. This Web page takes a quick look at these uses and discusses effectiveness.
  • Red Rice Yeast
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains that some red yeast rice products are considered "unapproved drugs" because they contain a potent cholesterol-lowering medicine called lovastatin. Red rice yeast is a common variation of red yeast rice.
  • Red Rice Yeast Alzheimers
    Red yeast rice appears to have cholesterol-lowering effects. This eMedTV page explains what the product is used for and describes how it's made. Red rice yeast alzheimers is a variation that may be used when looking for information on red yeast rice.
  • Red Rice Yeast Cholesterol
    Red yeast rice is often used to lower cholesterol. This eMedTV segment describes this product's effects and lists side effects that may occur. Red rice yeast cholesterol is a variation that may be used when looking for information on red yeast rice.
  • Red Rice Yeast Extract
    Red yeast rice is a product that can help lower cholesterol. This eMedTV page explains how the product is made and lists its potential side effects. Red rice yeast extract is a variation that may be used when looking for information on red yeast rice.
  • Red Rice Yeast Side Effects
    Some common side effects of red yeast rice include heartburn, gas, and dizziness. This eMedTV page also covers which side effects may require prompt medical care. Red rice yeast side effects is a common misspelling of red yeast rice side effects.
  • Red Yeast Rice
    Red yeast rice may help lower cholesterol because it can contain large amounts of lovastatin. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of red yeast rice, including information on how the product is fermented, possible side effects, and precautions.
  • Red Yeast Rice Extract
    As this eMedTV segment explains, red yeast rice extract is a supplement that some people take to reduce cholesterol. This article gives a brief overview of this product and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Red Yeast Rice Side Effects
    Heartburn, gas, and dizziness are possible side effects that may occur when taking red yeast rice. This eMedTV resource discusses other possible red yeast rice side effects, including those that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Redclover
    Red clover may have several beneficial uses, such as treating menopausal symptoms, PMS, and osteoporosis. This eMedTV page takes a look at red clover and offers a link to more detailed information. Redclover is a common misspelling of red clover.
  • Redon
    Radon is a colorless, odorless, and natural gas that is formed from the decay of uranium in rocks and soil. This eMedTV resource explores the risks of long-term exposure to high levels of radon. Redon is a common misspelling of radon.
  • Reduce Cholesterol
    Ways to reduce cholesterol discussed in this eMedTV resource include lifestyle changes, such as becoming more physically active and losing weight. This article also describes medications used to lower cholesterol, such as statins or fibrates.
  • Reduce High Blood Preasure Naturally
    This eMedTV article explores ways to lower your blood pressure through dietary means, such as eating more fruits and vegetables and less saturated fats. Reduce high blood preasure naturally is a common misspelling of reduce high blood pressure naturally.
  • Reducing Cholesteral
    Lowering your cholesterol can reduce your risk of having a heart attack. This eMedTV segment discusses several steps you can take to lower your cholesterol levels. Reducing cholesteral is a common misspelling and variation of lowering cholesterol.
  • Reducing Cholesterol
    Strategies to reduce cholesterol include lifestyle changes, such as losing weight or changing your diet. As this eMedTV page points out, several medications can help in reducing cholesterol as well, including statins, fibrates, and nicotinic acid.
  • Reducing High Blood Pressure
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, many people are able to reduce their high blood pressure by quitting smoking and making other lifestyle changes. However, in some cases, this isn't enough. This article has more details.
  • Reducing Triglicerides
    When lowering triglycerides, lifestyle changes are key. This eMedTV page lists factors your doctor will consider when starting treatment for high triglycerides. Reducing triglicerides is a common variation and misspelling of lowering triglycerides.
  • Reglan
    Reglan is a medication that can be prescribed to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV Web page explains how Reglan works for these conditions, offers dosing guidelines for the drug, and lists potential side effects that may occur.
  • Reglan Side Effects
    Potential Reglan side effects include diarrhea, loss of bladder control, and nausea. As this eMedTV page explains, while most side effects are mild, some require medical attention. Notify your doctor if you experience a high fever, wheezing, or hives.
  • Reglen
    Reglan is a medication used for treating the symptoms of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV Web page describes the effects of Reglan and lists potential side effects of this drug. Reglen is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Reglin
    Reglan is a medication that is available by prescription to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of Reglan and explains what forms the drug comes in. Reglin is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regorafenib
    This eMedTV article looks at how regorafenib can be used for the treatment of colorectal cancer in adults. It describes how this chemotherapy drug works and discusses possible side effects, dosing instructions, and other topics.
  • Regulan
    Reglan is a prescription medicine approved to treat GERD and diabetic gastroparesis. This eMedTV Web page covers other Reglan uses and explains what you should be aware of before using this drug. Regulan is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Regular Insulin
    Regular insulin is a short-acting insulin medication used to treat diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes how this form of insulin works, explains when and how to inject the medicine, and lists some of the potential side effects of this product.
  • Regulon
    Reglan is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of diabetic gastroparesis and GERD. This eMedTV page explains how Reglan works and lists potential side effects of the drug. Regulon is a common misspelling of Reglan.
  • Relacor
    Relacore is a non-prescription weight loss product. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Relacore, including information on how it works, general precautions of the product, and possible side effects. Relacor is a common misspelling of Relacore.
  • Relacore
    Relacore products are available over-the-counter and claim to help with weight loss. This eMedTV article provides a detailed look at Relacore, including information on how it supposedly works, its safety and effectiveness, side effects, and more.
  • Relacore Side Effects
    Headaches, insomnia, and indigestion are possible side effects of Relacore. This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at other potential side effects of the product, including more serious problems that should be reported to your doctor right away.
  • Relacore Weight Loss Pills
    This eMedTV article offers some basic information on Relacore, a pill that claims to help with weight loss. Topics covered in this selection include side effects, whether this weight loss pill is effective, and more.
  • Relafen
    This eMedTV article explores Relafen, a prescription drug used to treat pain, inflammation, swelling, and stiffness caused by osteoarthritis and other conditions. This page also covers Relafen dosing, side effects, and strengths.
  • Relafen 500 mg Tablets
    Two strengths of Relafen tablets are available: 500 mg and 750 mg. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of general dosing guidelines for this drug, including tips for safely and effectively using Relafen. A link to more details is also included.
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