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eMedTV Articles A-Z

Acoustic Neuroma Diagnosis - About Head Lice

This page contains links to eMedTV Articles containing information on subjects from Acoustic Neuroma Diagnosis to About Head Lice. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • 0.1% Tacrolimus Ointment
    Two different strengths of tacrolimus ointment are available, one of which is 0.1%. This page of the eMedTV library lists the other strength, provides a brief overview of this prescription skin medication, and includes a link to more information.
  • 10 mg Norvasc
    Of the three strengths of Norvasc on the market, 10 mg Norvasc is the strongest one available. This eMedTV article explains the benefits of using 10 mg Norvasc and offers dosing warnings for children using it.
  • 10 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 10 weeks pregnant, you may experience increased mood swings and additional weight gain. This eMedTV resource discusses weight gain during pregnancy and describes changes in the baby's development in the tenth week of pregnancy.
  • 1000 mg Niacin Supplements
    Of the supplements available for niacin, 1000 mg supplements are the strongest strength on the market. This eMedTV article explains how 1000 mg niacin supplements may help improve cholesterol and discusses general dosing guidelines.
  • 11 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 11 weeks pregnant, it's important to have another prenatal checkup. As this eMedTV article explains, this doctor's appointment will help monitor both your health and your baby's health. This page covers the eleventh week of pregnancy.
  • 12 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 12 weeks pregnant, your baby's organs are becoming more defined and better developed. This eMedTV resource explains how new developments, such as increased blood supply, affect your body when you are 12 weeks pregnant.
  • 13 Weeks Pregnant
    At 13 weeks pregnant, you're in the last week of your first trimester. As explained in this eMedTV segment, symptoms of early pregnancy may subside this week; however, you may experience abdominal pain as the ligaments that hold your uterus stretch.
  • 14 Weeks Pregnant
    At 14 weeks pregnant, you are now in your second trimester. As this eMedTV page explains, your nausea should be subsiding, but you now may have constipation. This article discusses changes in your body and your baby's development during week 14.
  • 15 Weeks Pregnant
    At 15 weeks pregnant, you may experience abdominal pain, nosebleeds, and changes in your hair and skin. As this eMedTV resource explains, such changes are normal. This article describes what you can expect at 15 weeks pregnant.
  • 16 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 16 weeks pregnant, your baby weighs about 3 ounces and can likely open its mouth and swallow. This eMedTV Web page describes what to expect at week 16 of pregnancy and discusses testing for possible birth defects.
  • 160 mg OxyContin
    OxyContin extended-release tablets are available in eight different strengths. As this eMedTV resource explains, people taking the 160 mg OxyContin tablets may need to take dietary precautions (as high-fat meals may increase drug levels in your blood).
  • 17 Weeks Pregnant
    At 17 weeks pregnant, you may be able to feel your baby move inside you. As this eMedTV page explains, your pregnancy should now be showing. This article describes what to expect when you are 17 weeks pregnant.
  • 18 Weeks Pregnant
    At 18 weeks pregnant, an ultrasound can help detect any potential problems with your baby's development. This eMedTV segment offers tips for choosing a pediatrician and discusses changes in you and your baby during the 18th week of pregnancy.
  • 19 Weeks Pregnant
    When you're 19 weeks pregnant, the baby is beginning to move more and is between 5.2 and 6 inches long. This eMedTV segment discusses the prenatal checkup you're likely to have at this time and includes information about anemia and pregnancy.
  • 1918 Flu
    The 1918 flu caused the highest number of known flu deaths worldwide, estimated at 50 million to 100 million people. This eMedTV article includes information and statistics related to this flu and explores whether it could happen again.
  • 2-Month-Old Baby (10 Weeks)
    This eMedTV page explores how to care for your 10-week-old baby, including tips on how to keep him healthy. This page also provides some suggestions on how to treat a baby who has congestion, such as using a bulb syringe and turning on a hot shower.
  • 2-Month-Old Baby (11 Weeks)
    An 11-week-old baby may be able to giggle and should have "tummy time" several times a day. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at what to expect during week 11 of your infant's life, including tips on upcoming vaccines and treating constipation.
  • 2-Month-Old Baby (8 Weeks)
    As this eMedTV page explains, by 2 months old, a baby is probably able to smile in response to you and hold his head upright when being held. This page further describes the developmental milestones of a 2-month-old and offers tips on car seat safety.
  • 2-Month-Old Baby (9 Weeks)
    At 9 weeks old, your baby may be starting to roll over from his tummy to his back. This eMedTV Web resource takes a further look at possible developmental milestones of a 9-week-old child and also offers several tips on household safety precautions.
  • 20 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 20 weeks pregnant, you may notice that your baby is quite active. As this eMedTV segment explains, you may also notice vaginal discharge at this time, which is normal in most cases. This page covers the 20th week of pregnancy in detail.
  • 21 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 21 weeks pregnant, your weight is probably about to start increasing rapidly. This eMedTV article describes other things to expect at 21 weeks pregnant and explains how low-impact exercise may help ease symptoms of pregnancy.
  • 22 Weeks Pregnant
    At 22 weeks pregnant, you may experience sporadic, painless contractions. As this eMedTV resource explains, these are normal. This article describes changes in you and your baby that are likely to occur during the 22nd week of pregnancy.
  • 23 Weeks Pregnant
    Once you are 23 weeks pregnant, mood swings, itchy skin, and other symptoms may make it hard to sleep. This eMedTV Web page discusses other things to expect when you're 23 weeks pregnant and explains why you should consider sleeping on your side.
  • 24 Weeks Pregnant
    During week 24 of pregnancy, blood vessels in your baby's lungs are forming. This eMedTV page describes the prenatal checkup you'll probably have at 24 weeks pregnant and discusses risks the posed by gestational diabetes.
  • 25 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 25 weeks pregnant, it's important to be aware of the signs of preterm labor, which this eMedTV article describes. This Web page also talks about hemorrhoids, forgetfulness, and other things you can expect during week 25 of pregnancy.
  • 26 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are about 26 weeks pregnant, your baby begins to make breathing movements. This eMedTV resource discusses other milestones in your baby's development that may occur in week 26 of pregnancy and provides tips for preparing the baby's room.
  • 27 Weeks Pregnant
    At 27 weeks pregnant, you're through your second trimester. However, as explained in this eMedTV resource, there are still physical changes for you to deal with and exciting development ahead for your baby when you're 27 weeks pregnant.
  • 28 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 28 weeks pregnant, your doctor will likely discuss your Rh factor with you. This eMedTV segment explains the complications Rh incompatibility may cause along with other information concerning you and your baby at week 28 of pregnancy.
  • 29 Weeks Pregnant
    When you're 29 weeks pregnant, your baby's kicks should be more frequent. As this eMedTV Web page explains, you may also experience heartburn and pelvic pain at 29 weeks pregnant. This article looks at what you can expect during week 29 of pregnancy.
  • 3 Weeks Pregnant
    When you're 3 weeks pregnant, the egg has been fertilized and is implanted in your womb. This eMedTV segment explains what you and your partner can expect during this week of pregnancy and outlines how eating well can help ensure a healthy baby.
  • 3-Month-Old Baby (12 Weeks)
    By 12 weeks old, your baby may be able to recognize his or her own name. This eMedTV Web article further explores the developmental milestones of a 12-week-old, including information on preparing for teething and the ending stages of colic.
  • 3-Month-Old Baby (13 Weeks)
    When your baby is 13 weeks old, he or she may be beginning to show some early signs of teething. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at what to expect when you have a 13-week-old infant, and offers some tips on keeping your baby healthy.
  • 3-Month-Old Baby (15 Weeks)
    At 15 weeks, your baby may be ready to learn to put himself to sleep. This eMedTV Web resource outlines some helpful tips for getting your 15-week-old infant to sleep on his own, as well as some suggestions on taking time for yourself.
  • 30 Weeks Pregnant
    At 30 weeks pregnant, you may experience symptoms such as constipation, swelling, and indigestion. This eMedTV resource discusses how to alleviate these symptoms and includes information about your baby's development in week 30 of pregnancy.
  • 300 Mg Temodar
    As this eMedTV Web selection explains, 300 mg of Temodar may be prescribed for the treatment of certain types of brain tumors. This resource describes the different forms of this drug and offers general dosing information. It also links to more details.
  • 31 Weeks Pregnant
    At 31 weeks pregnant, you may want to think about breastfeeding versus bottle feeding. This eMedTV article discusses what you can expect during week 31 of pregnancy, such as backaches, breathlessness, and Braxton Hicks contractions.
  • 32 Weeks Pregnant
    You and your partner may want to discuss a birth plan when you are 32 weeks pregnant. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides a list of questions to help you with your birth plan. This page also tells you what you can expect during week 32.
  • 33 Weeks Pregnant
    By the time you are 33 weeks pregnant, your baby has probably also moved into his or her birth position. This eMedTV resource explains what you can expect in week 33 of pregnancy and describes your baby's development during this time.
  • 34 Weeks Pregnant
    At 34 weeks pregnant, you should choose a doctor for your child, if you haven't done so already. This eMedTV article provides suggestions to help you in your search and discusses what to expect when you're 34 weeks pregnant.
  • 35 Weeks Pregnant
    By the time you are 35 weeks pregnant, your baby's lungs are almost fully developed. As this eMedTV segment explains, you may feel uncomfortable and have trouble sleeping this week. This page describes other things to expect at 35 weeks pregnant.
  • 35% Food Grade Hydrogen Peroxide
    This article from the eMedTV archives explains what is meant by the term "35% food grade hydrogen peroxide." This article also describes why this name can be somewhat misleading and provides a link to more detailed information on this product.
  • 35% Hydrogen Peroxide
    This part of the eMedTV site explains that hydrogen peroxide comes in different strengths, including a 35% solution. This resource offers more details on the 35% concentration and explains how it compares to regular, household-strength hydrogen peroxide.
  • 35% Hydrogen Poroxide
    As this eMedTV page explains, 35% hydrogen peroxide is not meant for human consumption. This article takes a look at this product and its different strengths. 35% hydrogen poroxide is a common misspelling of 35% hydrogen peroxide.
  • 36 Weeks Pregnant
    At 36 weeks pregnant, you'll probably start having weekly checkups. This eMedTV article discusses physical and emotional changes that you may experience during week 36 of pregnancy.
  • 37 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 37 weeks pregnant, your baby is about 6.5 pounds and gaining half an ounce of fat a day. This eMedTV Web page provides a list of what to bring with you to the hospital and discusses what you can expect during this week of pregnancy.
  • 38 Weeks Pregnant
    When you're 38 weeks pregnant, your baby is approximately 19 to 21 inches long from head to toe. This eMedTV resource discusses your baby's development at week 38 of pregnancy and explains false labor, real labor, and prelabor.
  • 39 Weeks Pregnant
    You are 39 weeks pregnant and, as this eMedTV resource explains, you can go into labor at any time. This page provides information on what to expect this week, as well as what you should do if you think your water has broken.
  • 4 Weeks Pregnant
    At 4 weeks pregnant, you will have missed your period. As this part of the eMedTV library explains, you may also experience nausea and fatigue. This article discusses what you and your partner can expect during your fourth week of pregnancy.
  • 4-Mg Nicotine Gum
    As this eMedTV page explains, people who smoke at least 25 cigarettes a day may benefit from the 4-mg strength of nicotine gum. This article lists the other available strength of nicotine gum and gives some general dosing tips to keep in mind.
  • 4-Month-Old Baby (16 Weeks)
    A baby will likely learn how to roll over from his back to his tummy during month 4. This eMedTV article describes some suggestions for ensuring that your 16-week-old baby is safe and healthy, including tips for baby proofing and information on vaccines.
  • 4-Month-Old Baby (17 Weeks)
    During month 4 of your baby's life, it may be time to introduce solid foods. This eMedTV page explains how to determine if your 17-week-old baby is ready for solid food, provides tips on baby proofing your home, and covers some developmental milestones.
  • 4-Month-Old Baby (18 Weeks)
    This page from the eMedTV site discusses what to expect from your 18-week-old baby, including some of the developmental milestones of this age. This article also provides some tips on shopping for baby formula and how to help your baby avoid the sniffles.
  • 4-Month-Old Baby (19 Weeks)
    A 19-week-old baby may begin sitting up unassisted. This selection from the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at what to expect in a 4-month-old infant, including major developmental milestones to be aware of and signs of teething.
  • 40 Weeks Pregnant
    You are 40 weeks pregnant, and you may deliver your baby before the week is out. This segment of the eMedTV archives explains what to expect after the birth of your baby.
  • 5 Weeks Pregnant
    By the time a woman is 5 weeks pregnant, the baby has developed a heartbeat of its own. This eMedTV segment explains the baby's development in detail and includes more information on what to expect when 5 weeks pregnant.
  • 5-HTP
    5-HTP is commonly used in many herbal supplements and is reported to help with several health conditions. This eMedTV page offers an overview of 5-HTP, including information on how it works, its safety and effectiveness, and possible side effects.
  • 5-HTP Dietary Supplement
    5-HTP is often recommended for depression or as a dietary supplement. This eMedTV presentation looks at 5-HTP, including whether it works and if it is safe.
  • 5-HTP Dosage
    A safe and effective dosage of 5-HTP has not yet been determined. This eMedTV article offers more information on dosing guidelines for this product and provides some suggestions on how to determine if a manufacturer is reputable.
  • 5-HTP Safety
    5-HTP may cause eosinophilia myalgia syndrome (EMS), a dangerous group of symptoms. This part of the eMedTV site provides other important 5-HTP safety warnings and precautions, including suggestions on what to look for on the label of 5-HTP products.
  • 5-HTP Side Effects
    Some of the possible side effects of 5-HTP may include nausea, indigestion, and diarrhea. This section of the eMedTV Web site describes other common side effects and also lists some of the more serious problems that may require medical care.
  • 5-Hydroxytryptophan
    5-hydroxytryptophan is a supplement that may help with things such as depression and weight loss. This eMedTV article provides more information on this product, including possible side effects and general safety precautions.
  • 5-Month-Old Baby (20 Weeks)
    A 20-week-old baby may be able to communicate some of her needs fairly well through gestures. This eMedTV segment describes what to expect during month 5 of your baby's life, including some helpful suggestions on how to start your baby on solid foods.
  • 5-Month-Old Baby (21 Weeks)
    This eMedTV segment explains that because your 21-week-old baby has improved eye/hand coordination, it is important to make sure any dangerous materials are out of his reach. This article also covers some safety tips on bath-time dangers.
  • 5-Month-Old Baby (22 Weeks)
    A 22-week-old baby may be able to sleep through the night without waking up to be fed. This eMedTV article discusses other potential milestones your 5-month-old infant may achieve at this time and also provides some suggestions on treating diaper rash.
  • 6 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 6 weeks pregnant, you are likely still experiencing symptoms like morning sickness. This eMedTV article describes your baby's development during the sixth week of pregnancy and offers tips to help relieve your symptoms.
  • 6-Mercaptopurine
    Healthcare providers may recommend mercaptopurine as a type of chemotherapy for a certain type of leukemia. This eMedTV Web page contains details on specific uses for this drug and describes how its active ingredient (6-mercaptopurine) works.
  • 6-Mercaptopurine Dose
    As discussed in this eMedTV Web page, 6-mercaptopurine tablets are taken once daily, in the evening, and on an empty stomach. This article looks at the factors that may affect your 6-mercaptopurine dose and provides a link to more details.
  • 6-Mercaptopurine for Crohn's
    Prescribing 6-mercaptopurine to treat Crohn's disease is an off-label (unapproved) use of the drug. This eMedTV segment discusses what this drug is approved for and explains how it works. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • 6-Month-Old Baby (24 Weeks)
    By 6 months old, most babies have figured out that rolling over is their best means of transportation. This eMedTV resource outlines other developmental achievements of 24-week-old babies, as well as some tips on eliminating that midnight feeding.
  • 6-Month-Old Baby (25 Weeks)
    By 25 weeks old, most babies may be able to sit up on their own and stay that way unassisted. This eMedTV article discusses other unique qualities of a 6-month-old baby, including tips on watching for food allergies and detail on developmental abilities.
  • 6-Month-Old Baby (26 Weeks)
    As this eMedTV Web page discusses, giving your 26-week-old baby the chance to interact with other babies can have a positive impact on later social skill development. This article also describes some sounds your baby may be making, such as "ma-ma."
  • 6-MP
    As discussed in this eMedTV page, mercaptopurine -- sometimes referred to as 6-MP -- is a tablet taken once daily to treat acute lymphatic leukemia. This article covers dosing instructions and details on who makes the brand-name and generic versions.
  • 6-MP and Leukemia
    As this eMedTV article explains, acute lymphatic leukemia may be treated with mercaptopurine, or 6-MP, a chemotherapy drug used to slow down the growth of cancer cells. This page covers more details on what it is approved for, how it works, and more.
  • 6-MP Side Effects
    Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea are some of the possible side effects of mercaptopurine, or 6-MP. This eMedTV Web page outlines other potential problems associated with this prescription drug. It also provides a link to more detailed information.
  • 6-Thioguanine
    As this eMedTV page discusses, thioguanine comes as tablets that are used to treat acute myeloid leukemia. This page examines the active ingredient in this drug, 6-thioguanine, and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • 7 Weeks Pregnant
    Symptoms you may experience when 7 weeks pregnant include morning sickness, weight gain, and constipation. This eMedTV article explains in detail what to expect when 7 weeks pregnant and discusses the early symptoms of a multiple pregnancy.
  • 7-Month-Old Baby (28 Weeks)
    A 28-week-old baby may be able to pull himself up to a standing position. This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses other developmental abilities of 7-month-old babies and also describes ways to avoid tooth decay and cavities in your baby.
  • 7-Month-Old Baby (29 Weeks)
    If your 7-month-old baby has a low-grade fever and is drooling a lot, he may be teething. This eMedTV Web resource describes other things your 29-week-old infant may experience, including some developmental milestones and potential allergies.
  • 7-Month-Old Baby (30 Weeks)
    A 30-week-old baby may be able to pick up small objects with his thumb and pointer finger. This eMedTV page discusses other developmental abilities that develop in 7-month-old infants, and also covers how to encourage and discourage certain behaviors.
  • 7-Month-Old Baby (31 Weeks)
    Your 31-week-old baby may begin jabbering a lot more and interacting with you on a more social level. This eMedTV article discusses other abilities your 7-month-old baby may be displaying and describes some potential problems when introducing new foods.
  • 8 Facts Every Man Should Know About Testicular Torsion
    Do you know what testicular torsion is? Do you know what to do if it occurs? This eMedTV segment presents eight important facts every man should know about testicular torsion, including symptoms, treatment, how it affects fertility, and more.
  • 8 Weeks Pregnant
    At 8 weeks pregnant, your body is continuing to change. As this eMedTV article explains, your baby is growing, too. This week, your baby's sexual organs are forming, and the arms and legs are taking shape. This page discusses week 8 in detail.
  • 8-Month-Old Baby (32 weeks)
    This page of the eMedTV Web library discusses what to expect when your baby is 32 weeks old. This page describes developmental milestones of an 8-month-old baby, as well as tips on flying with your baby and weaning your baby off breast milk.
  • 8-Month-Old Baby (33 weeks)
    At 33 weeks old, your baby has learned how to move around and may be ready to try some finger foods. This eMedTV page discusses some helpful tips for parents of an 8-month-old baby, such as how to play certain games to help reach developmental milestones.
  • 8-Month-Old Baby (34 weeks)
    At 34 weeks, babies have met the developmental milestone of object permanence. This selection from the eMedTV site explains what to expect from an 8-month-old baby and describes some helpful tips for traveling with your baby and possible games to play.
  • 8-Month-Old Baby (35 Weeks)
    You can expect your 34-week-old baby to want to explore everything at this age. This eMedTV page offers tips on how to encourage your baby to explore his or her surroundings in a safe way. This page also covers the research done on educational videos.
  • 9 Weeks Pregnant
    When you are 9 weeks pregnant, your baby is about 1 inch long and weighs about as much as a paper clip. This eMedTV article discusses what you can expect during your ninth week of pregnancy, which may include symptoms such as mood swings.
  • Aasthma
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site explains that asthma symptoms can include wheezing, chest tightness, and difficulty breathing. This article also explains what happens during an asthma attack. Aasthma is a common misspelling of asthma.
  • Abacavir
    Abacavir is approved for treating HIV and AIDS, and works by preventing the HIV virus from multiplying. This eMedTV resource offers information on the effects of this prescription medication, factors that affect the dosage, and potential side effects.
  • Abagio
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Aubagio is a medication prescribed to treat multiple sclerosis. This page describes what to discuss with your doctor and lists potential side effects. Abagio is a common misspelling of Aubagio.
  • Abatacept
    Abatacept is commonly prescribed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV segment further explores the effects of the drug, explains how it works, and offers warnings and precautions to be aware of prior to taking it.
  • Abatacept Side Effects
    Some of the most commonly reported abatacept side effects include infections, headaches, and cough. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects reported with this drug, including serious ones that should be reported immediately to a doctor.
  • Aberaterone
    Abiraterone is a medicine licensed to treat advanced-stage prostate cancer. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more information. Aberaterone is a common misspelling of abiraterone.
  • Abilfy
    Abilify is a prescription drug used for treating bipolar disorder, depression, autism, and schizophrenia. This eMedTV article describes the effects of Abilify and lists possible side effects that may occur. Abilfy is a common misspelling of Abilify.
  • Abilifi
    Abilify is a medication that can be prescribed to treat schizophrenia, depression, and other conditions. This eMedTV segment explains how the drug works and lists some possible side effects. Abilifi is a common misspelling of Abilify.
  • Abilify
    Abilify is a medication prescribed to treat schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, or major depression. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at this medication, including its effects, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Abilify 10 mg Tablets
    Adults being treated for schizophrenia typically start with Abilify 10 mg tablets or 15 mg tablets. This eMedTV Web page also includes Abilify dosing recommendations for the treatment of bipolar disorder.
  • Abilify 15 mg Tablets
    Adults with bipolar disorder usually start with Abilify 15 mg tablets (one tablet, once daily). This eMedTV page explains what other forms and strengths are available for Abilify and offers dosing guidelines for schizophrenia and depression treatment.
  • Abilify 2 mg Tablets
    Adolescents being treated for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia usually start with Abilify 2 mg tablets. This eMedTV segment explains what other strengths are available for this drug and also offers Abilify dosing recommendations for adults.
  • Abilify 20 mg Tablets
    The usual starting Abilify dose for treating depression is 2 mg to 5 mg daily. As this eMedTV page explains, for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, you need higher doses of Abilify; 20 mg tablets and 30 mg tablets are the highest available strengths.
  • Abilify 30 mg Tablets
    Although your doctor may start you on a low dosage, some people may end up taking Abilify 30 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource includes more detailed Abilify dosing guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and major depression.
  • Abilify 5 mg Tablets
    People being treated for depression usually start with either Abilify 2 mg tablets or Abilify 5 mg tablets. This eMedTV article also provides Abilify dosing guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia (for adults and children).
  • Abilify and Sex Drive
    Abilify is an atypical antipsychotic medication known to cause changes in sex drive. This page on the eMedTV site contains more information about Abilify and sex drive problems, and explains what other sexual side effects may occur with this drug.
  • Abilify and Weight Change
    Weight gain is one of the most common side effects of Abilify. As this eMedTV article explains, a small amount of weight gain is typical with this drug. If you are using Abilify and weight change occurs rapidly, however, you should notify your doctor.
  • Abilify and Weight Gain
    As this eMedTV article explains, Abilify may cause weight gain in some people -- increasing their risk of diabetes or other health problems. If you're taking Abilify and weight gain becomes a problem, let your doctor know.
  • Abilify Dangers
    Elderly people with dementia who take Abilify are more likely to die of various causes. This eMedTV resource discusses other possible Abilify dangers and lists some of the potentially serious side effects that may occur with this drug.
  • Abilify Discmelt
    As this eMedTV page explains, Abilify Discmelt tablets are designed to dissolve in the mouth and should not be swallowed. This article talks about what other forms Abilify comes in, explains what the drug is used for, and offers tips on using it.
  • Abilify Dosage
    The recommended starting Abilify dosage for people with bipolar disorder is 15 mg a day. This eMedTV segment also offers dosing guidelines for the treatment of schizophrenia and depression, and explains why the drug must be taken exactly as prescribed.
  • Abilify Drug Information
    Abilify is a prescription medicine used for controlling symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. This eMedTV article contains more Abilify drug information, including general dosing guidelines and important warnings and precautions.
  • Abilify Drug Side Effects
    Common Abilify drug side effects include insomnia, anxiety, and nausea. As this eMedTV page explains, while most Abilify side effects are mild, some are potentially serious and require medical attention (such as suicidal thoughts or rapid weight gain).
  • Abilify for Bipolar Disorder
    Doctors often prescribe Abilify for bipolar disorder to treat acute episodes of mania or mixed episodes. This eMedTV segment explains what other conditions can be treated with Abilify and describes how the drug works for bipolar disorder.
  • Abilify for Children
    Doctors can prescribe Abilify for children as young as age 10 for the treatment of bipolar disorder. As this eMedTV resource explains, this antipsychotic medication can also be used to treat schizophrenia in children 13 to 17 years old.
  • Abilify for Depression
    Doctors may recommend Abilify for depression treatment (when used along with antidepressants). This eMedTV segment explains how Abilify works to boost the effects of antidepressants and discusses other approved uses for this medication.
  • Abilify for Schizophrenia
    Doctors often prescribe Abilify for schizophrenia to help improve symptoms and to prevent relapses. This eMedTV resource explores other approved Abilify uses and describes the effects that this drug may have on people with schizophrenia.
  • Abilify Indications
    Abilify is approved for treating depression, bipolar disorder, autism, and schizophrenia. As this page on the eMedTV site explains, however, there are also a few off-label Abilify indications (such as for the treatment of behavior problems).
  • Abilify Maintena
    Healthcare providers may prescribe Abilify Maintena to treat schizophrenia. This eMedTV overview talks about how this antipsychotic drug works and how it is given, as well as possible side effects, general safety warnings, and more.
  • Abilify Medication
    A doctor may prescribe Abilify to treat schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and various other conditions. This eMedTV Web selection further explores Abilify, including information on why this medication may not be the best option for some people.
  • Abilify Medicine
    Abilify, a medicine available by prescription, is used to treat schizophrenia and other conditions. This eMedTV resource explores other Abilify uses and explains how the medication works for these various mental illnesses.
  • Abilify Oral
    Abilify is a medication used for treating mental illnesses, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. As this eMedTV segment explains, there are several different forms of Abilify: oral disintegrating tablets, regular tablets, and a liquid.
  • Abilify Risks
    Abilify may cause tardive dyskinesia, a condition involving unusual, uncontrollable body or face movements. This eMedTV article explores other Abilify risks and lists other potential side effects or complications that may occur with this medicine.
  • Abilify Safety
    There is an increased risk of stroke in elderly people who take Abilify for dementia. This part of the eMedTV Web site contains more Abilify safety information and provides a list of potential side effects that may occur with this medicine.
  • Abilify Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Abilify include vomiting, dizziness, and anxiety. Besides common side effects, this eMedTV page covers serious side effects that require medical attention, as well as some less common side effects (like anemia).
  • Abilify Substitute
    If you develop any side effects or do not respond well to Abilify, alternatives to the drug are available. This eMedTV resource explains what medications can be used as an Abilify substitute and describes various types of psychosocial therapy.
  • Abilify Tablets
    Abilify is a prescription drug approved to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism, and depression. As this eMedTV Web page explains, there are currently several different forms of Abilify: tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, and liquid.
  • Abilify Withdraw
    If you abruptly stop taking Abilify, withdrawal symptoms could occur. This eMedTV page explains why you may experience withdrawal and lists possible withdrawal symptoms. Abilify withdraw is a common misspelling of Abilify withdrawal.
  • Abilify Withdrawal
    You should get your healthcare provider's approval before stopping treatment with Abilify. As this eMedTV article explains, stopping Abilify abruptly can cause problems such as insomnia or symptoms of bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.
  • Abilify Withdrawal Symptoms
    As with most drugs for mental illnesses, you should not stop taking Abilify without your doctor's approval. This eMedTV segment provides a list of possible Abilify withdrawal symptoms that may occur if you stop using the medication too abruptly.
  • Abirateron
    Abiraterone is a medicine used for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works, covers some dosing information, and lists possible side effects. Abirateron is a common misspelling of abiraterone.
  • Abiraterone Acetate
    Men who have advanced prostate cancer may benefit from abiraterone acetate. This eMedTV article explains how this prescription medicine can help slow down the growth of cancer cells and lists possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Abiraterone and Increased Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer
    As this eMedTV page explains, when abiraterone was taken by men with metastatic prostate cancer in clinical studies, it increased survival rates by up to four months. This page further explores the research done on this drug and links to more details.
  • Abiraterone Brand Name
    As this eMedTV segment explains, abiraterone is sold under the brand name Zytiga and is prescribed to treat advanced prostate cancer. This article explains how this drug works and discusses generic availability. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Ablify
    Abilify is a medicine used for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism, and major depression. This eMedTV page takes a brief look at Abilify and provides a link to more detailed information. Ablify is a common misspelling of Abilify.
  • About Adult ADHD
    As this eMedTV page discusses, adults who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may have trouble paying attention or completing tasks. This article offers more details about ADHD in adults, including a link to more information on the topic.
  • About Allergies
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, allergies occur when the body's immune system reacts to normally harmless substances, such as pollen. This segment talks about allergies in more detail, including a link to more information on this topic.
  • About Autism
    Children with autism have trouble communicating and forming relationships with others. This eMedTV article will help you learn about autism, including who is affected by it, how it is diagnosed, and more.
  • About Avodart
    Avodart is a drug used to treat an enlarged prostate. This eMedTV page talks in more detail about this medication, including what to expect during treatment with Avodart and how long it may take to see results.
  • About Ear Infections
    This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at ear infections, with details about common symptoms, how they are treated, and more. Also included is a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • About Food Allergies
    This part of the eMedTV library gives an overview of food allergies, with information about what they are, common symptoms, and more. Also included is a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • About Genitile Warts
    Genital warts typically look like soft, moist, pink, or flesh-colored swellings. This page from the eMedTV archives describes genital warts in detail and explains what causes the condition. Genitile warts is a common misspelling of genital warts.
  • About Head Lice
    Head lice are a common infestation of the hair and scalp. This part of the eMedTV site tells you what you need to know about head lice, including who is most at risk, symptoms, and more. A link to more information is also included.
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